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You searched for +publisher:"University of Kansas" +contributor:("Rhode, Paula C."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Kansas

1. Chang, Olivia L. GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2009, University of Kansas

Obesity is a steadily growing epidemic with serious health related consequences. Over the last several decades, the treatment of obesity has evolved and now successfully yields weight losses of typically 5-10%. However, long-term weight loss maintenance remains elusive. Research has identified the strategies that are essential in maintaining weight loss, however an understanding of the psychological processes that drive these behaviors is lacking. It has been suggested that there is a fundamental difference between the processes that underlie the initiation of behavior change and the maintenance of these changes, and that little attention has been paid to the processes that sustain behavior change over time. The goals that individuals set, the expectations for attaining these goals, and the satisfaction associated with the outcome of these efforts may impact weight loss and weight loss maintenance. These constructs have been examined in the context of weight loss, but they have yet to be explored in the weight loss maintenance phase. This study examined the impact of goals, expectations, and satisfaction on weight loss maintenance in individuals who completed a weight loss program and were striving to maintain their weight losses. Participants included men and women (N = 67) who had recently lost at least 5% of their body weight. They were weighed and completed psychological measures at baseline, 2 months, and 4 months. Results indicated that there was no support for the hypothesis that goals, expectations, and satisfaction predict weight loss maintenance. In addition, goals and expectations for weight loss maintenance did not predict satisfaction with weight. Implications and future directions are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Karpowitz, Dennis H. (advisor), Rhode, Paula C. (advisor), Higgins, Raymond L. (cmtemember), Kirk, Sarah (cmtemember), Lichtenberg, James W. (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical psychology; Expectations; Goals; Satisfaction; Weight loss maintenance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chang, O. L. (2009). GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/5952

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chang, Olivia L. “GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed May 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/5952.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chang, Olivia L. “GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS.” 2009. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Chang OL. GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2009. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/5952.

Council of Science Editors:

Chang OL. GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/5952


University of Kansas

2. Hockemeyer, Jill Renee. Written emotional expression: Effects on weight loss and maintenance.

Degree: PH.D., Psychology, 2007, University of Kansas

The consequences of the current obesity epidemic are taking a serious toll on the health and the economics of our society. The prevention and treatment of obesity remain a challenge for researchers and society. Over the past 15-20 years behavioral treatments have been developed which have been successful in helping people lose weight, but individuals struggle to maintain this weight loss. Several studies provide evidence that emotional and psychological factors may play an important role in weight loss and maintenance. However, most behavioral treatment approaches do not adequately address the role of emotional factors. Interventions specifically designed to help individuals who are overweight or obese better cope with emotional distress may attenuate the negative effects of distress on weight loss and maintenance through improved emotional self-regulatory processes. This study examined the effects of expressive writing on weight regain, stress, and emotional eating among individuals who have recently lost weight. Men and women (N = 64) who recently lost weight were recruited and randomized to either an emotional expressive (n = 31) or to a placebo control writing intervention (n = 33). Baseline assessments were completed followed by writing sessions that took place once weekly across four consecutive weeks. Follow-up assessments of weight, stress and emotional eating were completed at the end of the final writing session, and again at 1 and 3 months. Results from this study indicated that there was no support for expressive writing to impact the rate of weight regain among individuals who have recently lost weight. However, there was partial support for expressive writing to decrease stress levels. No support was found, however, for expressive writing to decrease emotional eating. The results from this study provide poor support for the beneficial effects of written emotional disclosure on buffering weight regain and decreasing emotional eating following weight loss treatment. There is, however, minimal evidence that expressive writing may produce favorable effects on stress levels in individuals who are attempting to maintain weight loss. Implications of these findings and ideas for future research to improve weight loss and maintenance outcomes are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Karpowitz, Dennis H. (advisor), Rhode, Paula C. (advisor), Higgins, Raymond L. (cmtemember), Kirk, Sarah (cmtemember), Frey, Bruce (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hockemeyer, J. R. (2007). Written emotional expression: Effects on weight loss and maintenance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4019

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hockemeyer, Jill Renee. “Written emotional expression: Effects on weight loss and maintenance.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed May 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4019.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hockemeyer, Jill Renee. “Written emotional expression: Effects on weight loss and maintenance.” 2007. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Hockemeyer JR. Written emotional expression: Effects on weight loss and maintenance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2007. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4019.

Council of Science Editors:

Hockemeyer JR. Written emotional expression: Effects on weight loss and maintenance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4019

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