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You searched for +publisher:"University of Kansas" +contributor:("Kozleski, Elizabeth B"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Kansas

1. Knackstedt, Kimberly. Seclusion and Restraint in Schools: Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice.

Degree: PhD, Special Education, 2017, University of Kansas

Seclusion and restraint are aversive behavioral practices used in schools for control and punishment. The practices were first used in psychiatric hospitals as a means of control over patients. Eventually, the practices began being used in schools alongside other aversive and exclusionary discipline practices, including corporal punishment, suspension, and expulsion. Limited research has explored the connection between policies governing the use of seclusion and restraint and practices in schools. Grounded in organizational theory, this study analyzes the impact of policies on seclusion and restraint practice in 18 states through a multi-phase analysis. The first phase of the analysis explored trends in practices across the U.S. related to discipline, seclusion and restraint, and inclusion of students with disabilities using geo-mapping. After identifying the 18 states for further review, the second phase used a quantitative analysis to identify predictors of seclusion and restraint in each state and with pooled data of all the selected states. The final phase reviewed policies from each of the 18 states on seclusion and restraint to identify similarities and differences. The findings suggest that seclusion and restraint practices will not disappear from the repertoire of teachers simply through policies and mandatory prevention. However, gradual steps must be taken to connect stakeholders and shift from a culture of discipline and control to prevention and inclusion. Policy and research must be utilized as levers to make this change possible. Advisors/Committee Members: Kozleski, Elizabeth B (advisor), Skrtic, Tom M (advisor), Wehmeyer, Michael (cmtemember), Kurth, Jennifer (cmtemember), Saatcioglu, Argun (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Special education; Education policy; discipline; education; policy; restraint; seclusion; seclusion and restraint

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Knackstedt, K. (2017). Seclusion and Restraint in Schools: Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26141

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Knackstedt, Kimberly. “Seclusion and Restraint in Schools: Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26141.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Knackstedt, Kimberly. “Seclusion and Restraint in Schools: Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice.” 2017. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Knackstedt K. Seclusion and Restraint in Schools: Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26141.

Council of Science Editors:

Knackstedt K. Seclusion and Restraint in Schools: Connecting Research, Policy, and Practice. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26141


University of Kansas

2. Siuty, Molly Elizabeth. (Re)Constituting Teacher Identity for Inclusion in Urban Schools: A Process of Reification and Resistance.

Degree: PhD, Special Education, 2017, University of Kansas

Urban education systems serve nearly 16 million students and employ almost one million teachers in the United States. The preparation of teachers for urban settings must attend to the unique and complex historical and sociocultural context of urban communities. This includes disrupting dominant stereotypes, particularly of urban communities of color, and recognizing urban communities as vibrant and culturally rich. In addition, they must also recognize larger systems of power that influence the way in which resources are unevenly distributed between urban communities and schools. Furthermore, urban special education teacher preparation requires a comprehensive understanding of structural inequity that addresses disability and its intersection with other marginalized identities. Critical inclusive education offers an overarching framework for preparing (special) educators to critically analyze the way in which dominant ideologies (e.g., ableism, racism, sexism, etc.) to construct normalcy. It also critiques the way these dominant norms are used to justify the exclusion of students deemed different from the dominant norm. Critical inclusive education expands the definition of inclusion beyond the physical placement of students in general education to one that includes: (1) a cultural historical dimension, (2) an understanding of community and participation, and (3) a transformative agenda. Scholars of critical inclusive teacher preparation have envisioned (special education) teachers as potential change agents in the social project of increased equity and inclusion. Yet, (special) educators face structural inequities themselves as they are socialized into communities of practice that are not conducive to critical inclusion. This study addresses the lack of literature around the process of post-graduate teacher identity (re)constitution in their practice contexts. Using critical ethnographic methods, I studied four graduates of a teacher preparation program with a commitment to critical inclusion and urban education. My conceptual framework for this study drew on history-in-person, communities of practice, and figured worlds to understand the ways in which participants navigated the inherent tensions between the inclusive messages of their preparation program and their practice contexts. Three themes emerged from the analysis: (1) Constructs that Endure, (2) Inclusion Gatekeepers, and (3) Teacher Identity as Advocate. In sum, participants simultaneously constructed identities as resistors and reifiers of dominant ideologies in schools. Implications for how critical inclusive teacher preparation programs can help support new teachers as they transition to practice contexts will be discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Kozleski, Elizabeth B (advisor), Robinson, Suzanne M (advisor), Cheatham, Gregory (cmtemember), Annamma, Subini A (cmtemember), Hallman, Heidi (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Special education; inclusive education; teacher education; teacher identity; urban education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Siuty, M. E. (2017). (Re)Constituting Teacher Identity for Inclusion in Urban Schools: A Process of Reification and Resistance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26117

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Siuty, Molly Elizabeth. “(Re)Constituting Teacher Identity for Inclusion in Urban Schools: A Process of Reification and Resistance.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26117.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Siuty, Molly Elizabeth. “(Re)Constituting Teacher Identity for Inclusion in Urban Schools: A Process of Reification and Resistance.” 2017. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Siuty ME. (Re)Constituting Teacher Identity for Inclusion in Urban Schools: A Process of Reification and Resistance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26117.

Council of Science Editors:

Siuty ME. (Re)Constituting Teacher Identity for Inclusion in Urban Schools: A Process of Reification and Resistance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26117


University of Kansas

3. Yu, Ting Iris. Challenging Transition: A Singapore Case Study of a Cultural Concept.

Degree: PhD, Special Education, 2017, University of Kansas

The transition from child to adult is a process that has been widely theorized across different countries and in many different domains in academia. Youth transition, as it is known in developmental research, is a time when individual identity is developing and choices regarding future careers are an important part of that process. In many developed countries, it is also a period of time when many youths leave formal education and become disengaged from further education, training, and employment. Students with dis/abilities have been identified as a critical segment of the youth population who are not engaged in education, training, or employment. Therefore transition is increasingly becoming an important political, economic, and educational issue. Within the domain of special education, Western philosophies of adulthood have dominated the discourse around transition, focusing on independent living and self-determination of individuals. The literature review of the topics in this area indicated a need to have a socio-cultural-historical understanding and approach to transition. This study sought to understand the important experiences and resources for students with dis/abilities in Singapore, who were transiting between formal educational settings into vocational educational settings. This research took a socio-cultural-historical perspective on the observed phenomena of transition. The experiences of the study participants were contextualized within the specific cultural milieu that exists in Singapore. Thus the study embedded transition planning and support activities for students with dis/abilities leaving secondary school within the current social, cultural, and historical context that is idiosyncratic to Singapore. The individual student with dis/abilities was considered to be in a transitional phase, moving from adolescence into adult roles. Their individual development was mediated by their cultural and social experiences—both in and out of school contexts—as well as the tools that were offered to them in these contexts. A developmental analysis of the individual cultural background and experiences helped to explain how they identified, as well as described their goals and aspirations. The research strategy was to use ethnographic and phenomenological methods to understand the experiences of three student participants. A series of interviews were conducted with the students, their families, and their teachers. This included studying each student’s biography, examining the relationships between family and school life, the interactions that students had with family and school that influenced the way they saw themselves, their identities, and the actions that they took. In order to understand the school environment, context, and culture, the school leaders were interviewed and ethnographic observations were conducted.. The findings showed that the families emphasized the roles that allowed them to protect their child, teach them about life, and offer a range of resources and experiences to support their child.… Advisors/Committee Members: Kozleski, Elizabeth B (advisor), Robinson, Suzanne (advisor), Annamma, Subini A (cmtemember), Morningstar, Mary E (cmtemember), Skrtic, Thomas M (cmtemember), Ng, Jennifer (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Special education; Multicultural education; Education policy; Cultural Psychology; Emerging Adulthood; Inclusive Education; Singapore; Student Voice; Transition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yu, T. I. (2017). Challenging Transition: A Singapore Case Study of a Cultural Concept. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26470

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yu, Ting Iris. “Challenging Transition: A Singapore Case Study of a Cultural Concept.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26470.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yu, Ting Iris. “Challenging Transition: A Singapore Case Study of a Cultural Concept.” 2017. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Yu TI. Challenging Transition: A Singapore Case Study of a Cultural Concept. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26470.

Council of Science Editors:

Yu TI. Challenging Transition: A Singapore Case Study of a Cultural Concept. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26470

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