Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Kansas" +contributor:("Canda, Edward R"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Kansas

1. Ruble, Racheal A. Making Ourselves Understood: The Role of Previous Experience, Stereotypes, Communication Accommodation, and Anxiety in Americans' Perceptions of Communication with Chinese Students.

Degree: PhD, Communication Studies, 2011, University of Kansas

This study examined American students' perceptions of communication with Chinese international students in two parts. First, studies were conducted to explore the stereotypes American students have about Chinese students. To begin, 100 American students from classes at a large midwestern university listed traits describing a typical Chinese student, generating a total of 31 unique descriptors. Next, 146 American participants from the same university reported the percentage of Chinese students they believed to possess each of the 31 traits and the favorability of those traits. Exploratory factor analysis revealed five primary stereotypes of Chinese students. Some reflect previous literature concerning stereotypes of Asians generally (e.g., smart/hardworking), whereas others are less common (e.g., nice/friendly). Secondly, and as primary focus of the project, 364 American students were presented, in an experimental design, with descriptions of a Chinese student who possessed traits consistent with one of the five stereotypes revealed in the first studies. Unexpectedly, there were relatively few differences in anxiety felt about and accommodations viewed as necessary when interacting with the described Chinese student. Similarly, participants reported comparable levels of willingness to interact with and social attractiveness of the Chinese student, regardless of how she was described in the experimental conditions. Intercultural sensitivity and quantity of contact with Chinese culture were found to be significant predictors of many of the outcome variables. Upon further analyses, it appears as though decreases in uncertainty, brought about by familiar stereotypes (e.g., a Chinese student incompetent in English and not assimilated), or increases in uncertainty, brought about by less familiar stereotypes (e.g., a Chinese student who is oblivious, annoying, and loud), interact with the amount of anxiety felt about interacting with a described Chinese student to determine willingness to interact with as well as the social attractiveness of the student. The significance of the findings and directions for future research are discussed in relation to prior literature on stereotyping, intercultural communication competence, intergroup contact, communication accommodation theory, anxiety/uncertainty management theory, and implicit personality theory. Advisors/Committee Members: Zhang, Yan Bing (advisor), Baym, Nancy (cmtemember), Hall, Jeffrey A. (cmtemember), Hummert, Mary Lee (cmtemember), Canda, Edward R. (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Accommodation; Anxiety; Chinese international students; Contact; Intercultural sensitivity; Stereotypes

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ruble, R. A. (2011). Making Ourselves Understood: The Role of Previous Experience, Stereotypes, Communication Accommodation, and Anxiety in Americans' Perceptions of Communication with Chinese Students. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/9798

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ruble, Racheal A. “Making Ourselves Understood: The Role of Previous Experience, Stereotypes, Communication Accommodation, and Anxiety in Americans' Perceptions of Communication with Chinese Students.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed April 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/9798.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ruble, Racheal A. “Making Ourselves Understood: The Role of Previous Experience, Stereotypes, Communication Accommodation, and Anxiety in Americans' Perceptions of Communication with Chinese Students.” 2011. Web. 18 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Ruble RA. Making Ourselves Understood: The Role of Previous Experience, Stereotypes, Communication Accommodation, and Anxiety in Americans' Perceptions of Communication with Chinese Students. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2011. [cited 2019 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/9798.

Council of Science Editors:

Ruble RA. Making Ourselves Understood: The Role of Previous Experience, Stereotypes, Communication Accommodation, and Anxiety in Americans' Perceptions of Communication with Chinese Students. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/9798


University of Kansas

2. Nam, Eunji. Family, Friends, and Romantic Partners’ Influence on Mental Health Recovery among Emerging and Middle-aged Adults with Serious Mental Illness.

Degree: PhD, Social Welfare, 2018, University of Kansas

Emerging adults refer to young people between the ages of 18 to 29 according to the theory of emerging adults. Scholars now recognize that emerging adults with serious mental illness (SMI) are at a distinctive developmental stage and thus their services and support needs are distinguished from children or older adults with SMI. However, evidence-based and developmentally appropriate mental health programs, particularly for emerging adults with SMI, are lacking. The purpose of this study is to explore the distinctiveness of emerging adults with SMI. Guided by the social convoy model and the multidimensional model of mental health recovery, this study compared the differences in the social relational characteristics and their influences on mental health recovery between emerging (n=149) and middle-aged adults with SMI (n=296) using the National Survey of American Life. The findings suggest that emerging adults with SMI are different from middle-aged adults with SMI in a few ways; however, they also have many similarities in terms of the social relational characteristics and their influences on mental health recovery. First, regarding the social relational characteristics of emerging adults with SMI, emerging adults with SMI had more negative interactions with family, more positive support from friends, and more negative interactions with romantic partners than middle-aged adults with SMI, though these differences in social relationships were not statistically significant after adjusting for sex, race, income level, and number of years since the onset of SMI. Second, regarding the role of social relationships in mental health recovery, the influence of family was different for emerging and middle-aged adults with SMI. Positive support from family was statistically significantly associated with the mental health recovery of emerging adults with SMI while negative interactions with family were statistically significantly associated with the mental health recovery of middle-aged adults with SMI. However, positive support from friends was statistically significantly associated with the mental health recovery of both emerging and middle-aged adults with SMI. This study has further discussed implications for theory, empirical mental health research, and social work practice. Limitations and suggestions for future research are also discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Canda, Edward R. (advisor), Matejkowski, Jason (cmtemember), Johnson-Motoyama, Michelle (cmtemember), Goscha, Richard J (cmtemember), Lowe, Patricia (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Social work; emerging adults; recovery; serious mental illness; social relationships; structural equation modeling

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nam, E. (2018). Family, Friends, and Romantic Partners’ Influence on Mental Health Recovery among Emerging and Middle-aged Adults with Serious Mental Illness. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27050

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nam, Eunji. “Family, Friends, and Romantic Partners’ Influence on Mental Health Recovery among Emerging and Middle-aged Adults with Serious Mental Illness.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed April 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27050.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nam, Eunji. “Family, Friends, and Romantic Partners’ Influence on Mental Health Recovery among Emerging and Middle-aged Adults with Serious Mental Illness.” 2018. Web. 18 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Nam E. Family, Friends, and Romantic Partners’ Influence on Mental Health Recovery among Emerging and Middle-aged Adults with Serious Mental Illness. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2018. [cited 2019 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27050.

Council of Science Editors:

Nam E. Family, Friends, and Romantic Partners’ Influence on Mental Health Recovery among Emerging and Middle-aged Adults with Serious Mental Illness. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27050


University of Kansas

3. Kluck, Benjamin Joseph. The Effects of Focus of Meditation on Pain Tolerance, Compassion, and Anxiety Levels.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2008, University of Kansas

Sixty-one individuals participated in a study to examine whether practicing a meditation with a spiritual focus would demonstrate higher pain tolerance and faster pain awareness (cold-pressor task), increased implicit compassion (lexical decision task), and reduced state anxiety levels (State Anxiety Inventory) relative to control conditions. Study participants attended initial training in meditation and then were randomly assigned to either a spiritual, religious, attachment security, or neutral meditation condition. Participants then meditated for 20 minutes a day and were tested at the end of two weeks. Results show that while meditation condition differences were not found for the pain tolerance and anxiety measures, individuals in the spiritual meditation condition demonstrated higher pain awareness. Also, both spiritual and religious meditation groups reported increased implicit compassion levels relative to controls. These findings are discussed in relation to previous similar research (Wachholtz & Pargament, 2005) and the call for increased investigations of underlying psychological mechanisms of meditation and mindfulness interventions. Advisors/Committee Members: Gillath, Omri (advisor), Karpowitz, Dennis H. (advisor), Higgins, Raymond L. (cmtemember), Kirk, Sarah (cmtemember), Canda, Edward R (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical psychology; Anxiety; Compassion; Meditation; Mindfulness; Pain

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kluck, B. J. (2008). The Effects of Focus of Meditation on Pain Tolerance, Compassion, and Anxiety Levels. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4511

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kluck, Benjamin Joseph. “The Effects of Focus of Meditation on Pain Tolerance, Compassion, and Anxiety Levels.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed April 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4511.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kluck, Benjamin Joseph. “The Effects of Focus of Meditation on Pain Tolerance, Compassion, and Anxiety Levels.” 2008. Web. 18 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Kluck BJ. The Effects of Focus of Meditation on Pain Tolerance, Compassion, and Anxiety Levels. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2008. [cited 2019 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4511.

Council of Science Editors:

Kluck BJ. The Effects of Focus of Meditation on Pain Tolerance, Compassion, and Anxiety Levels. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4511

.