Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Kansas" +contributor:("Ash, Ronald"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Kansas

1. Milakhina, Daria. Essays in Labor Ecnomics.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2016, University of Kansas

This dissertation studies various aspects of labor economics, such as subjective well-being, the effects of pronatalist policies as well as tools that are helpful for economic analysis such as using incentives in surveys. Subjective well-being has become a popular topic in labor economics as some economists suggest that subjective well-being and utility are closely related. Economic theory suggests that individual characteristics and the quality of formal institutions, in particular corruption, should influence the level of one's well-being and understanding this connection help better understand different aspects of incentives of corruption. Understanding fertility decisions of women depending on financial incentives is another relevant topic for labor economics. Pronatalist policies can have heterogeneous effects as women with different socio-economic backgrounds would view the strength of financial incentives differently. Finally, I evaluate how financial incentives are used in convincing people to take a survey. Both academic and commercial researchers struggle to increase response rates in surveys, and understanding how these incentives work contributes to solving the low response rate problem. Advisors/Committee Members: Ginther, Donna (advisor), Rosenbloom, Joshua (cmtemember), Earnhart, Diertich (cmtemember), Ash, Ronald (cmtemember), Asiedu, Elizabeth (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Economics; corruption; fertility program; incentives; labor economics; Russia; subjective well-being

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Milakhina, D. (2016). Essays in Labor Ecnomics. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21875

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Milakhina, Daria. “Essays in Labor Ecnomics.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed May 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21875.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Milakhina, Daria. “Essays in Labor Ecnomics.” 2016. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Milakhina D. Essays in Labor Ecnomics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2016. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21875.

Council of Science Editors:

Milakhina D. Essays in Labor Ecnomics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21875


University of Kansas

2. Ji, Yong Yeon. Uncovering the Role of Human Resource Management in Organizational Turnarounds: Supernumerary or Supporting Actor?.

Degree: PhD, Business, 2009, University of Kansas

The main research question of this dissertation was derived from a few common sense perceptions most people have about health. The question that we address is how to define organizational health and how it relates to firm performance. As the recent economic crisis caused by the failure of financial markets indicates, an unbalanced or biased view of organizational health may have detrimental effects on overall organizational sustainability. This dissertation focuses on the role of human resources (HR) in promoting organizational health. I propose three positive effects of human resource management (HRM) on firm performance in the context of organizational turnarounds. First, the inoculating effect addresses whether HR is a significant factor in determining organizational survival or failure. Second, the mitigating effect addresses the extent to which HR can help "soften" organizational decline. Finally, the restoring effect addresses the extent to which HR plays a role in helping organizations recover from organizational decline. The HR-related information was mostly derived from 10-K annual reports and the Compustat database through content analysis. Two independent coders were selected and trained to achieve inter-coder reliability in order to accurately assess the strength of the statements on the HR index items. This allowed me to estimate firms' relative "Emphasis on HR". The relationship between Emphasis on HR and the prediction of firm performance was analyzed through hierarchical OLS/logistic regression, quantile regression, and structural equation modeling (SEM). I found that the results generally support the inoculating effect, mitigating effect, and restoring effect. The results showed that firms with higher Emphasis on HR are more likely to a) be classified as non-declining b) perform better than other peers in the same industry, c) experience less probability of bankruptcy, d) experience a shorter declining period, and e) recover from a downturn stage even during their declining period. These findings imply that there is a positive relationship between Emphasis on HR and (1) the avoidance of organizational decline and (2) firm performance of the firms that are in a declining stage. Although HR has been neglected in the turnaround process, the results of this research offer a new way to see HR's role: a supporting actor in the drama of organizational turnarounds rather than a supernumerary. Advisors/Committee Members: Guthrie, James P (advisor), Ash, Ronald (cmtemember), Barker, Vincent L (cmtemember), Lee, Jeong-Yeon (cmtemember), Little, Todd (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Business administration; Management; Content analysis; Role of hr; Turnaround; http://id.worldcat.org/fast/536264; http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1007141; http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1779502; http://id.worldcat.org/fast/879725; United States. Small Business Administration; Management; Content analysis; Corporate turnarounds – Management

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ji, Y. Y. (2009). Uncovering the Role of Human Resource Management in Organizational Turnarounds: Supernumerary or Supporting Actor?. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/5365

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ji, Yong Yeon. “Uncovering the Role of Human Resource Management in Organizational Turnarounds: Supernumerary or Supporting Actor?.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed May 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/5365.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ji, Yong Yeon. “Uncovering the Role of Human Resource Management in Organizational Turnarounds: Supernumerary or Supporting Actor?.” 2009. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Ji YY. Uncovering the Role of Human Resource Management in Organizational Turnarounds: Supernumerary or Supporting Actor?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2009. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/5365.

Council of Science Editors:

Ji YY. Uncovering the Role of Human Resource Management in Organizational Turnarounds: Supernumerary or Supporting Actor?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/5365


University of Kansas

3. Messersmith, Jake. Transforming Caterpillars Into Butterflies: The Role of Managerial Values and HR Systems in the Performance of Emergent Organizations.

Degree: PH.D., Business, 2008, University of Kansas

Emerging firms are the foundation for economic growth in today's business world, yet relatively little is known about the factors that contribute to the success or failure of developing organizations. This research study helps to address this broad question by examining the role that managerial values and practices play in the performance of high-tech start-ups. Using the resource-based and dynamic capability perspectives, this research project examines three critical factors that are likely to affect the performance of emerging firms: human resource policies and practices, an overarching philosophy of partnership, and an entrepreneurial orientation. Each of these is argued to produce a sustainable competitive advantage by providing firms with the ability to dynamically configure and reconfigure resource bundles. Results indicate that high performance work systems and partnership philosophy are positively associated with sales growth and innovation. Additional findings suggest that partnership and an entrepreneurial orientation both increase the likelihood of implementing high performance work systems. Finally, the results suggest that firms combining a greater utilization of high performance work systems with an entrepreneurial orientation achieve higher levels of sales growth. Advisors/Committee Members: Guthrie, James P (advisor), Ash, Ronald (cmtemember), Barker, III, Vincent L (cmtemember), Lee, Jeong-Yeon (cmtemember), Burton, Diane M (cmtemember), Little, Todd (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Business administration; Management; High performance work systems; Entrepreneurship; Partnership philosophy; http://id.worldcat.org/fast/536264; http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1007141; http://id.worldcat.org/fast/912787; United States. Small Business Administration; Management; Entrepreneurship

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Messersmith, J. (2008). Transforming Caterpillars Into Butterflies: The Role of Managerial Values and HR Systems in the Performance of Emergent Organizations. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4032

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Messersmith, Jake. “Transforming Caterpillars Into Butterflies: The Role of Managerial Values and HR Systems in the Performance of Emergent Organizations.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed May 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4032.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Messersmith, Jake. “Transforming Caterpillars Into Butterflies: The Role of Managerial Values and HR Systems in the Performance of Emergent Organizations.” 2008. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Messersmith J. Transforming Caterpillars Into Butterflies: The Role of Managerial Values and HR Systems in the Performance of Emergent Organizations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2008. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4032.

Council of Science Editors:

Messersmith J. Transforming Caterpillars Into Butterflies: The Role of Managerial Values and HR Systems in the Performance of Emergent Organizations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/4032

.