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You searched for +publisher:"University of Kansas" +contributor:("Antonio, Bob"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Kansas

1. Comi, Matthew James. Selling Seeds, Selling Communities: Re-Seeing Agronomy and Conventional Agricultural Seed Development and Exchange in Rural Kansas and Missouri.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2018, University of Kansas

This qualitative research explores agri-food issues in contemporary, conventional hybrid seed production and exchange, particularly the sales of high-earning corn and soy hybrids ubiquitous on the farms practicing conventional growing techniques in Northeast Kansas and Northwest Missouri. Data for this project is drawn from on-site interviews conducted with sales agronomists working in the NE Kansas and NW Missouri agricultural region. The project asks about the materiality of the hybrid seeds and how sales agronomists see, interact with, and describe seeds, chemicals, and other services to farmer clients. The research reveals a hybrid seed package that bears multiple meanings across different networks of individuals alongside agronomists, a population of non-farming rural community members who feel the losses in population and community resiliency associated with large-farm agriculture but who also feel committed and responsible to the individual wellbeing of their farmer clients. The research also reveals a growing prevalence of precision agriculture services offered by sales agronomists. Drawing from the work of Bennet’s vital materialism (2010) and contemporary revisions of the Deleuze-Guattarian assemblage (DeLanda 2016), this research suggests that automated precision agriculture methods reveal a food regime which distributes agency between many participants, conversely delimiting individual autonomy of the farmer-owner. I suggest that the problems preventing higher numbers of farmers from adopting ecologically sustainable practices may not be individually ideological or economic, but rather problems of agentic capacity, of who/what makes a difference in contemporary agricultural assemblages. Advisors/Committee Members: Stock, Paul (advisor), Antonio, Bob (cmtemember), Kindscher, Kelly (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; Environmental studies; Agriculture; Agronomy; Biotechnology; Environment; Farmer; Seeds

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Comi, M. J. (2018). Selling Seeds, Selling Communities: Re-Seeing Agronomy and Conventional Agricultural Seed Development and Exchange in Rural Kansas and Missouri. (Masters Thesis). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27807

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Comi, Matthew James. “Selling Seeds, Selling Communities: Re-Seeing Agronomy and Conventional Agricultural Seed Development and Exchange in Rural Kansas and Missouri.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Kansas. Accessed November 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27807.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Comi, Matthew James. “Selling Seeds, Selling Communities: Re-Seeing Agronomy and Conventional Agricultural Seed Development and Exchange in Rural Kansas and Missouri.” 2018. Web. 21 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Comi MJ. Selling Seeds, Selling Communities: Re-Seeing Agronomy and Conventional Agricultural Seed Development and Exchange in Rural Kansas and Missouri. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Kansas; 2018. [cited 2019 Nov 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27807.

Council of Science Editors:

Comi MJ. Selling Seeds, Selling Communities: Re-Seeing Agronomy and Conventional Agricultural Seed Development and Exchange in Rural Kansas and Missouri. [Masters Thesis]. University of Kansas; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27807

2. Listerman, Jeffrey Sloan. Factors that Most Influence Success or Failure in Illicit Crop Reduction and Drug Supply Control.

Degree: MA, Global and International Studies, Center for, 2014, University of Kansas

Several interrelated drivers of illicit crop cultivation appear remarkably consistent across virtually all illegal crop producing regions: insurgency or armed conflict, insufficient state authority and weak territorial control, a climate of instability, poverty and food insecurity, remoteness and a lack of infrastructure and development. This research paper argues that the enduring success of illicit crop reduction and drug supply control efforts in a given area depends on the extent to which these environmental factors are mitigated or eliminated. The work further proposes that properly designed, carefully coordinated, and consistently funded alternative development (AD) programs have demonstrated the greatest promise for dramatically altering the primary drivers underlying illegal drug crop cultivation. By contrast, it contends that forced crop eradication without the prior establishment of effective AD can and has often resulted in dramatic short-term reductions in drug crop yields while exacerbating the fundamental causes of illicit cultivation. The research employs two case-oriented methods of qualitative analysis. First, a within-case method of process tracing is used, followed by a method of comparative analysis between the three case studies: Thailand and Laos in Southeast Asia, and Colombia in South America. Advisors/Committee Members: Hanley, Eric (advisor), Antonio, Bob (cmtemember), Reich, Gary (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Political Science; International relations; Criminology; drug control policy; illicit crop cultivation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Listerman, J. S. (2014). Factors that Most Influence Success or Failure in Illicit Crop Reduction and Drug Supply Control. (Masters Thesis). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/18094

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Listerman, Jeffrey Sloan. “Factors that Most Influence Success or Failure in Illicit Crop Reduction and Drug Supply Control.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Kansas. Accessed November 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/18094.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Listerman, Jeffrey Sloan. “Factors that Most Influence Success or Failure in Illicit Crop Reduction and Drug Supply Control.” 2014. Web. 21 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Listerman JS. Factors that Most Influence Success or Failure in Illicit Crop Reduction and Drug Supply Control. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Kansas; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/18094.

Council of Science Editors:

Listerman JS. Factors that Most Influence Success or Failure in Illicit Crop Reduction and Drug Supply Control. [Masters Thesis]. University of Kansas; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/18094

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