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You searched for +publisher:"University of Kansas" +contributor:("Acosta, Rafael"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Kansas

1. Barroso, Javier. The Representation of Nazism and World War II in the Literature of Argentina and Mexico.

Degree: PhD, Spanish & Portuguese, 2017, University of Kansas

Since the 1960s Nazism, the Holocaust, Adolf Hitler, the atomic bomb, and World War II have been recurring tropes in Argentine and Mexican literature, demanding to be studied as an overarching phenomenon that has existed for decades in these two countries. These works have mostly been studied as indirect references to the Argentine dictatorship or to the current wave of narco-violence in Mexico. Most analyses reinforce traditional notions of allegory in which the allegorical text is mirroring its referent in a parallel relationship. To some extent, this parallel relationship is encouraged by the literary texts themselves, as they often introduce explicit references to local historical events alongside the representations of Nazism or World War II, most notably the dictatorial periods in Argentina, or the gruesome violence in Mexico’s narco-war. I find, however, that some of these critical interpretations leave no room for readings that go beyond analyzing representations of Nazism as metaphors. My main objective is to show that in each region the literary representations of World War II events can be read beyond these canonical and often pre-established interpretations. Instead, I argue that these literary texts represent (and sometimes challenge) other unexplored situations and conflicts in these nations such as xenophobia, racism, the naturalization of violence, and the need for a new intellectual ethic. To reveal these other, latent possibilities, I rely on the concept of dialectical or interlocking allegories to analyze how the texts’ referents and signs are constantly building on each other instead of simply mirroring each other. Advisors/Committee Members: Garibotto, Verónica (advisor), Day, Stuart (cmtemember), Unruh, Vicky (cmtemember), Acosta, Rafael (cmtemember), Janzen, Marike (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Latin American literature; Allegory; Latin America; Nazism

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APA (6th Edition):

Barroso, J. (2017). The Representation of Nazism and World War II in the Literature of Argentina and Mexico. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25997

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barroso, Javier. “The Representation of Nazism and World War II in the Literature of Argentina and Mexico.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25997.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barroso, Javier. “The Representation of Nazism and World War II in the Literature of Argentina and Mexico.” 2017. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Barroso J. The Representation of Nazism and World War II in the Literature of Argentina and Mexico. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25997.

Council of Science Editors:

Barroso J. The Representation of Nazism and World War II in the Literature of Argentina and Mexico. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25997


University of Kansas

2. García Genel, Angélica. Memoria prestada. La represión y los movimientos estudiantiles en dos casos de estudio: México (1968) y España (1960-1977).

Degree: PhD, Spanish & Portuguese, 2017, University of Kansas

Abstract Throughout this dissertation, I address the nuances of memory in regards to the student movements and the consequent governmental repression in two cases of study: Spain during the late Francoism, and in Mexico, 1968. Here, I propose that novels, films and other visual objects (such as collages and photographs) that have been produced during the 21st century display an aesthetic that I call “memory borrowings.” This is a hybrid aesthetic that incorporates archival materials, but that also, by means of several fictional techniques, re-defines and re-constructs the discourses surrounding these events. It is an aesthetic that destabilizes and/or creates a distance with the notion of trauma. The relevance of these cultural objects and their pursuit of creating a distance with the notion of trauma lies in the intent to incorporate a new generation of young students into the shaping of memory the act of remembering. Since ex-president’ Vicente Fox Quesada’s (2000-2006) re-opening of the case related to Tlatelolco in 2002, along with the recent events in Ayotzinapa, Mexico where 43 students went missing (2014), the memory of the massacre in Tlatelolco has regained interest. On the other hand, research involving the Spanish dictatorship of Francisco Franco is often approached as a monolithic period, even though the dictatorship went through changes and different stages. Therefore, references of the specific participation of students and young leaders in rebelling against the regime can still be explored; while the cultural objects I analyze offer an opportunity to study mnemonic processes from the perspective of those who, as of today, work to on update and keep the conversation of these student movements active. I join to the conversation related to memory and trauma studies seeking to share my findings about the way recent cultural production engages those who seemingly are yet to establish a connection with the memory of the student movements during the Spanish late Francoism and in Mexico, 1968. Advisors/Committee Members: Pérez, Jorge (advisor), Garibotto, Verónica (advisor), Day, Stuart (cmtemember), Acosta, Rafael (cmtemember), Falicov, Tamara (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Literature; 1968; Fracoism; Memory; Mexico-Spain; Student Movements; Trauma

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

García Genel, A. (2017). Memoria prestada. La represión y los movimientos estudiantiles en dos casos de estudio: México (1968) y España (1960-1977). (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27786

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

García Genel, Angélica. “Memoria prestada. La represión y los movimientos estudiantiles en dos casos de estudio: México (1968) y España (1960-1977).” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27786.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

García Genel, Angélica. “Memoria prestada. La represión y los movimientos estudiantiles en dos casos de estudio: México (1968) y España (1960-1977).” 2017. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

García Genel A. Memoria prestada. La represión y los movimientos estudiantiles en dos casos de estudio: México (1968) y España (1960-1977). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27786.

Council of Science Editors:

García Genel A. Memoria prestada. La represión y los movimientos estudiantiles en dos casos de estudio: México (1968) y España (1960-1977). [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/27786


University of Kansas

3. Dalton, David Scott. EMBODYING MODERNITY IN MEXIO: RACE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE BODY IN THE MESTIZO STATE.

Degree: PhD, Spanish & Portuguese, 2015, University of Kansas

Mexico’s traumatic Revolution (1910-1917) attested to stark divisions that had existed in the country for many years. After the dust of the war settled, post-revolutionary leaders embarked on a nation-building project that aimed to assimilate the country’s diverse (particularly indigenous) population under the umbrella of official mestizaje (or an institutionalized mixed-race identity). Indigenous Mexican woud assimilate to the state by undergoing a project of “modernization,” which would entail industrial growth through the imposition of a market-based economy. One of the most remarkable aspects of this project of nation-building was the post-revolutionary government’s decision to use art to communicate official discourses of mestizaje. From the end of the Revolution until at least the 1970s, state officials funded cultural artists whose work buoyed official discourses that posited mixed-race identity as a key component of an authentically Mexican modernity. Throughout this dissertation, I argue that post-revolutionary state and lettered officials viewed the hybridization of indigenous and female bodies with technology as paramount in their attempts to articulate a new national identity. As they fused the body with technology through medicine, education, industrial agriculture and factory work, state officials believed that they could irradicate indigenous “primitivity” and transform Amerindians into full-fledged members of the nascent, mestizo state. In the pages that follow, I analyze the work of José Vasconcelos, Emilio “El Indio” Fernández, El Santo, and Carlos Olvera. These artists, and many others, used very different media and produced their works during different decades; however, each artists’ work posits the fusion of the body with technology as key to forming an “authentic,” Mexican identity. The most remarkable finding of my study is that thinkers with vastly different worldviews concurred with the idea that technology could modernize indigenous bodies and thus aid in their assimilation to the modern, mestizo state. Advisors/Committee Members: Day, Stuart A (advisor), Tosta, Luciano (cmtemember), Acosta, Rafael (cmtemember), Persley, Nicole Hodges (cmtemember), Hoeg, Jerry (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Latin American literature; Latin American studies; Film studies; critical race theory; cyborg; lettered city; mestizaje; posthumanism; post-revolutionary Mexico

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dalton, D. S. (2015). EMBODYING MODERNITY IN MEXIO: RACE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE BODY IN THE MESTIZO STATE. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/24838

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dalton, David Scott. “EMBODYING MODERNITY IN MEXIO: RACE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE BODY IN THE MESTIZO STATE.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/24838.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dalton, David Scott. “EMBODYING MODERNITY IN MEXIO: RACE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE BODY IN THE MESTIZO STATE.” 2015. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Dalton DS. EMBODYING MODERNITY IN MEXIO: RACE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE BODY IN THE MESTIZO STATE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/24838.

Council of Science Editors:

Dalton DS. EMBODYING MODERNITY IN MEXIO: RACE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE BODY IN THE MESTIZO STATE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/24838

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