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You searched for +publisher:"University of Iowa" +contributor:("Hua, Youjia"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Iowa

1. Alwahbi, Abdullah Abdulmohsen. Using contingency contracting to improve social interactions between students with ASD and their peers.

Degree: PhD, Teaching and Learning, 2017, University of Iowa

Students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have severe impairment in social skills, which affects all areas of development. Researchers have indicated peer-mediated intervention (PMI) may improve social skills of children with ASD. PMI involves training carefully selected nondisabled peers to teach academic or social skills to students with disabilities using strategies such as modeling, prompting, and reinforcement in an inclusive education setting. However, a review of the literature suggests that PMI in and of itself may be beneficial, but not sufficient, to enhance social interaction among students with ASD and their peers. The literature suggests that incorporating components that encourage student interaction in the PMI procedures may enhance its effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of peer training and peer training with contingency contracting on the frequency of social interactions between children with ASD and their nondisabled peers. I chose contingency contracting in the study because it involves the use of systematic prompting and reinforcement to increase student interaction. Three students with ASD and six typically developing peers enrolled in an inclusive elementary school in Saudi Arabia participated in the study. I conducted the study using a multiple-baseline design across participants. The results showed that peer training alone did not improve or maintain the social interactions between the participants. When the intervention included contingency contracting, the frequency of social interactions significantly increased. Advisors/Committee Members: Hua, Youjia (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Teacher Education and Professional Development

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alwahbi, A. A. (2017). Using contingency contracting to improve social interactions between students with ASD and their peers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Iowa. Retrieved from https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/5907

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alwahbi, Abdullah Abdulmohsen. “Using contingency contracting to improve social interactions between students with ASD and their peers.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Iowa. Accessed February 19, 2019. https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/5907.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alwahbi, Abdullah Abdulmohsen. “Using contingency contracting to improve social interactions between students with ASD and their peers.” 2017. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Alwahbi AA. Using contingency contracting to improve social interactions between students with ASD and their peers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/5907.

Council of Science Editors:

Alwahbi AA. Using contingency contracting to improve social interactions between students with ASD and their peers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2017. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/5907


University of Iowa

2. Yuan, Chengan. The effects of error correction with and without reinforcement on skill acquisition and preferences of children with autism spectrum disorder.

Degree: PhD, Teaching and Learning, 2018, University of Iowa

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often require early intensive behavioral interventions (EIBI) to improve their skills in a variety of domains. Error correction is a common instructional component in EIBI programs because children with ASD tend to make persistent errors. Ineffective error correction can result in a lack of learning or undesirable behavior. To date, research has not systematically investigated the use of reinforcement during error correction for children with ASD. This study compared the effects of correcting errors with and without reinforcement and their impact on preferences of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Four boys with ASD between 3 to 7 years old in China participated in this study. In the context of a repeated-acquisition design, each participant completed three sets of matching-to-sample task under the two error-correction procedures. During the error correction with reinforcement condition, the participants received the reinforcers after correct responses prompted by the researcher following errors. During the without-reinforcement condition, the participants did not receive any reinforcers after prompted responses. The number of sessions required to reach mastery criterion under the two conditions varied among the participants. Visual analysis did not confirm a functional relation between the error-correction procedures and the sessions required to reach mastery. With regard to children’s preferences, three children preferred the with-reinforcement condition and one preferred the without-reinforcement condition. The findings had conceptual implications and suggested practical implications relating to treatment preference. Advisors/Committee Members: Hua, Youjia (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: autism; early intervention; error correction; reinforcement; skill acquisition; treatment preference; Teacher Education and Professional Development

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yuan, C. (2018). The effects of error correction with and without reinforcement on skill acquisition and preferences of children with autism spectrum disorder. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Iowa. Retrieved from https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/6529

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yuan, Chengan. “The effects of error correction with and without reinforcement on skill acquisition and preferences of children with autism spectrum disorder.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Iowa. Accessed February 19, 2019. https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/6529.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yuan, Chengan. “The effects of error correction with and without reinforcement on skill acquisition and preferences of children with autism spectrum disorder.” 2018. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Yuan C. The effects of error correction with and without reinforcement on skill acquisition and preferences of children with autism spectrum disorder. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2018. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/6529.

Council of Science Editors:

Yuan C. The effects of error correction with and without reinforcement on skill acquisition and preferences of children with autism spectrum disorder. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2018. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/6529

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