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You searched for +publisher:"University of Iowa" +contributor:("Bennett, Jeffrey A. (Jeffrey Allen), 1974-"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Iowa

1. Irving, Brook Alys. Ruination as invention: reconstructions of space and time in a deindustrial landscape.

Degree: PhD, Communication Studies, 2015, University of Iowa

This dissertation argues that the symbolic force of deindustrial Rust Belt decline is expressed through patterns of rhetorical invention, what I call ruination rhetorics. Ruination, I argue, works to construct divergent orientations toward space and time in representations of the Rust Belt. I trace these orientations as a way of charting the contours of how we understand domestic urban decay in our contemporary political and economic climate. This project argues that ruination's inventive force hints at a number of thematics including: ruination as urban waste; ruination as a claim to forms of nostalgia and authenticity; ruination as a linkage between temporal configurations of the past and the present; and ruination as a narrative form enabling what I call a "melancholic" rhetorical style. In all of these instances, ruination supports differentiated orientations toward time and space, creating temporal and geographical connections and boundaries through rhetorical manipulations. In this way, the times and spaces of and for industrial ruination shift, and in so doing, their discursive manifestations elucidate the diversity and instability of spatio-temporal structures. Conceptually, I argue that ruination shapes an understanding of space and time as fluid concepts, rather than stagnant or pre-determined categories. And by unpacking the ways that ruination traffics in representations of Rust Belt geographies and citizens, we discover an increasingly complex discursive field out of which meaningful relationships to decay and renewal might be forged. In this way, ruination does not weave a cohesive narrative of what the Rust Belt is, where the Rust Belt is, or who does or does not lay claim to its political realities and challenges. Rather, its divergent and contradictory modes of rhetorical invention suggest ruination expresses the incoherencies and compatibilities constitutive of an everyday life lived in the ebbs and flows of a material space that is always-already a site of ongoing decay and renewal. Advisors/Committee Members: Bennett, Jeffrey A. (Jeffrey Allen), 1974- (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: publicabstract; Invention; Rhetoric; Ruin; Rust Belt; Space/Place; Time; Communication

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APA (6th Edition):

Irving, B. A. (2015). Ruination as invention: reconstructions of space and time in a deindustrial landscape. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Iowa. Retrieved from https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/1640

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Irving, Brook Alys. “Ruination as invention: reconstructions of space and time in a deindustrial landscape.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Iowa. Accessed March 24, 2019. https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/1640.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Irving, Brook Alys. “Ruination as invention: reconstructions of space and time in a deindustrial landscape.” 2015. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Irving BA. Ruination as invention: reconstructions of space and time in a deindustrial landscape. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/1640.

Council of Science Editors:

Irving BA. Ruination as invention: reconstructions of space and time in a deindustrial landscape. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2015. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/1640


University of Iowa

2. Pariyadath, Renu. When coporations migrate south: rethinking citizenship and privileged migrant mobilities for equitable development.

Degree: PhD, Communication Studies, 2015, University of Iowa

Since the 1990s, governments of migrant sending and receiving countries, policy institutes, the United Nations and allied international financial institutions, and migration researchers in the academy have shown a heightened interest in the role that diasporas can play in the development of the Global South. As government responsibility to social welfare recedes and as humanitarian aid shrinks, these stakeholders have looked toward the wealth offered by diasporas. The resultant discourse of diaspora and development, the dissertation argues, is changing the meaning of the discursive construction of "diaspora" in its articulation with the concurrent construct of "development". This presents scholars with new challenges in studying diaspora and transnationalism. The expansion of who gets to be counted as diaspora and its articulation with newly extended diasporic citizenship limits the nature of citizenship to the performative and to the exclusive domain of giving. Accordingly, the study examines the communicate and relational practices of Association for India's Development (AID), a 1000-volunteer-strong migrant Indian non-profit organization in the United States, to critique and expand the diaspora and development discourse. Through an extended case study of AID's practice and performance of citizenship, this study makes contributions to theories about the space of `home' and its relation to the practice of politics; migrant presence and performance of citizenship in the Global North; diasporic interventions in the discourse of development; and strategic mobilizing for broad-based social justice issues. First, the dissertation unpacks the meaning-making practices that AID volunteers associate with the construct `development', and demonstrates how the volunteers' discourse of "development as sustainability" challenges notions of charity and the brain metaphor trafficking in policy reports and scholarship. The study then examines the treatment of diasporic imaginings of home in theory and migration policy, juxtaposed with AID's practices related to India arguing that practices of deconstructing home/nation allow this organization to center diasporic privilege rather than loss. This allows for less common alliance-building practices with populations from historically marginalized religious, caste and class backgrounds and a centering of marginalized voices within multiple diasporic homes. The dissertation also examines annual die-ins by AID's Austin chapter, staged in solidarity with survivors of the Bhopal gas disaster of 1984 that complicates the notion of presence in theorizations of transformation in new forms of citizenship. The study finally takes an ethnographic peek into an education project that used to be supported by AID in India. The backstage organizing work studied, suggests that what seems like a single-issue movement strategically employs universal discourses of `quality education' for organizing multiple publics. The study required multi-sited critical ethnographic fieldwork in… Advisors/Committee Members: Bennett, Jeffrey A. (Jeffrey Allen), 1974- (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Bhopal; Development; Diaspora; India; Migration; Non-Profit Organization; Communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pariyadath, R. (2015). When coporations migrate south: rethinking citizenship and privileged migrant mobilities for equitable development. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Iowa. Retrieved from https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/5595

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pariyadath, Renu. “When coporations migrate south: rethinking citizenship and privileged migrant mobilities for equitable development.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Iowa. Accessed March 24, 2019. https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/5595.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pariyadath, Renu. “When coporations migrate south: rethinking citizenship and privileged migrant mobilities for equitable development.” 2015. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Pariyadath R. When coporations migrate south: rethinking citizenship and privileged migrant mobilities for equitable development. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/5595.

Council of Science Editors:

Pariyadath R. When coporations migrate south: rethinking citizenship and privileged migrant mobilities for equitable development. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2015. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/5595


University of Iowa

3. Fischer, Tahlia G.M.B. (Re)membering a Christian nation: Christian nationalism, biblical literalism, and the politics of public memory.

Degree: PhD, Communication Studies, 2014, University of Iowa

This dissertation explores the manner in which theological elements from a biblical literalist perspective undergird and authorize the historical memory texts produced by Christian nationalist advocates in support of conservative Protestant religious establishment. Christian nationalist discourses exploit notions of divine warrant, public remembrance, and "historical evidence" as means to read the nation and contemporary far right ideological commitments as biblically founded, and hence, as binding upon the nation. Focusing on the rhetoric of David Barton, Christian nationalist par excellence and Republican Party operative, I argue that discourses of Christian nationhood mobilize the theologies of providence, inerrancy, inspiration, and literalism as rhetorical strategies to situate God's law as the definitive legal standard through which American law and cultural values are (de)authorized. Drawing upon the presumptions of biblical literalism to present the textual "proof' of a Christian nation, the politics of this memory work (and the many ways these discourses presume to furnish textual proofs of a biblical nation) aims to influence and to shape public memory, opinion, political behavior, and policy formation in favor of far right Protestant hegemonic interests. Advisors/Committee Members: Bennett, Jeffrey A. (Jeffrey Allen), 1974- (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: David Barton; nationalism; political rhetoric; public memory; Religion and theology; religious rhetoric; Communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fischer, T. G. M. B. (2014). (Re)membering a Christian nation: Christian nationalism, biblical literalism, and the politics of public memory. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Iowa. Retrieved from https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/4629

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fischer, Tahlia G M B. “(Re)membering a Christian nation: Christian nationalism, biblical literalism, and the politics of public memory.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Iowa. Accessed March 24, 2019. https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/4629.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fischer, Tahlia G M B. “(Re)membering a Christian nation: Christian nationalism, biblical literalism, and the politics of public memory.” 2014. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Fischer TGMB. (Re)membering a Christian nation: Christian nationalism, biblical literalism, and the politics of public memory. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/4629.

Council of Science Editors:

Fischer TGMB. (Re)membering a Christian nation: Christian nationalism, biblical literalism, and the politics of public memory. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2014. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/4629

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