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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Oyler, Elizabeth A"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Park, Yeon Joo. Shaking dance in the stormy valley: tendai discourse on kami-buddha relations in fourteenth century mount hiei.

Degree: PhD, East Asian Languages and Cultures, 2016, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation explores medieval Japanese discourse on the amalgamation of kami and buddhas, particularly as represented in Keiran shūyōshū, a fourteenth century encyclopedic Japanese Tendai text, which presents the highest knowledge of medieval Taimitsu scholasticism on Mt. Hiei. Focusing on the inner logic of the “origin-trace” structure central to the Kami-Buddha combinatory discourse, this study investigates the rationale of nonduality between buddhas and kami or the origin and manifested traces. Examining representations of kami as manifestations of buddhas and the complex web of their relationships in Keiran, this study elucidates that the origin-trace scheme is indispensable from medieval Taimitsu teachings—in particular, the esoteric idea of copenetration and mutual identity, as well as the doctrine of original enlightenment and its associated rituals and practices. Examination of these interrelated issues culminates by centering on Keiran’s discussion of kami’s manifestation in the form of the snake and its association with the sixth consciousness, through which the main discussions of this study—kami as manifestations, kami’s manifestations, and nonduality of the origin and trace, are integrated into the problem of our mind cultivation toward enlightenment. Throughout this study, I pay attention to several allegories associated with the notion of nonduality in Keiran, which include the allegory of the shaking dance mentioned in the title of this dissertation, as well as various analogies connected to the form of the snake. At the end of this study, the main features of thie symbolic complex of nonduality are analyzed as being correlated in their subtle yet ultimate signification of our innate capacity to attain enlightenment, which should be sought after and sustained with our persistently dedicated practices. Advisors/Committee Members: Ruppert, Brian (advisor), Ruppert, Brian (Committee Chair), Mayer, Alexander L (committee member), Oyler, Elizabeth A (committee member), Toby, Ronald P (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Medieval Japanese Kami-Buddha amalgamation; honji suijaku; Tendai chroniclers; Keiran shūyōshū; serpent symbols; nonduality; original enlightenment; Taimitsu consciousness discourse

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Park, Y. J. (2016). Shaking dance in the stormy valley: tendai discourse on kami-buddha relations in fourteenth century mount hiei. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95455

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Park, Yeon Joo. “Shaking dance in the stormy valley: tendai discourse on kami-buddha relations in fourteenth century mount hiei.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed December 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95455.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Park, Yeon Joo. “Shaking dance in the stormy valley: tendai discourse on kami-buddha relations in fourteenth century mount hiei.” 2016. Web. 16 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Park YJ. Shaking dance in the stormy valley: tendai discourse on kami-buddha relations in fourteenth century mount hiei. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95455.

Council of Science Editors:

Park YJ. Shaking dance in the stormy valley: tendai discourse on kami-buddha relations in fourteenth century mount hiei. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95455


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

2. Jelesijevic, Dunja. Rituals of the enchanted world: Noh theater and religion in medieval Japan.

Degree: PhD, E Asian Languages & Cultures, 2016, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This study explores of the religious underpinnings of medieval Noh theater and its operating as a form of ritual. As a multifaceted performance art and genre of literature, Noh is understood as having rich and diverse religious influences, but is often studied as a predominantly artistic and literary form that moved away from its religious/ritual origin. This study aims to recapture some of the Noh’s religious aura and reclaim its religious efficacy, by exploring the ways in which the art and performance of Noh contributed to broader religious contexts of medieval Japan. Chapter One, the Introduction, provides the background necessary to establish the context for analyzing a selection of Noh plays which serve as case studies of Noh’s religious and ritual functioning. Historical and cultural context of Noh for this study is set up as a medieval Japanese world view, which is an enchanted world with blurred boundaries between the visible and invisible world, human and non-human, sentient and non-sentient, enlightened and conditioned. The introduction traces the religious and ritual origins of Noh theater, and establishes the characteristics of the genre that make it possible for Noh to be offered up as an alternative to the mainstream ritual, and proposes an analysis of this ritual through dynamic and evolving schemes of ritualization and mythmaking, rather than ritual as a superimposed structure. Chapters Two through Five are analyses of four Noh plays, Kanawa, Dōjōji, Yamamba, and Hyakuman. This selection reflects my argument that a particularly efficacious form of Noh ritual is one that best responds to the liminal quality of the medieval worldview, and this is expressed through a specific way in which the main protagonist of each play is constructed as a ritualist and an object of ritual, and symbolically embodied in various incarnations of the character of demon - oni. Advisors/Committee Members: Ruppert, Brian O (advisor), Oyler, Elizabeth A (Committee Chair), Mayer, Alexander L (committee member), Toby, Ronald P (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Noh; Ritual

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jelesijevic, D. (2016). Rituals of the enchanted world: Noh theater and religion in medieval Japan. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95537

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jelesijevic, Dunja. “Rituals of the enchanted world: Noh theater and religion in medieval Japan.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed December 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95537.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jelesijevic, Dunja. “Rituals of the enchanted world: Noh theater and religion in medieval Japan.” 2016. Web. 16 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Jelesijevic D. Rituals of the enchanted world: Noh theater and religion in medieval Japan. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95537.

Council of Science Editors:

Jelesijevic D. Rituals of the enchanted world: Noh theater and religion in medieval Japan. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95537

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