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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Meseguer, Jose"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Bauer, Matthew Steven. Analysis of randomized security protocols.

Degree: PhD, Computer Science, 2018, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Formal analysis has a long and successful track record in the automated verification of security protocols. Techniques in this domain have converged around modeling protocols as non-deterministic processes that interact asynchronously through an adversarial environment controlled by a Dolev-Yao attacker. There are, however, a large class of protocols whose correctness relies on an explicit ability to model and reason about randomness. Lying at the heart of many widely adopted systems for anonymous communication, these protocols have so-far eluded automated verification techniques. The present work overcomes this long standing obstacle, providing the first framework analyzing randomized security protocols against Dolev-Yao attackers. In this formalism, we present algorithms for model checking safety and indistinguishability properties of randomized security protocols. Our techniques are implemented in the Stochastic Protocol ANalyzer (SPAN) and evaluated on a new suite of benchmarks. Our benchmark examples include a brand new class of protocols that have never been subject of formal (symbolic) verification, including: mix-networks, dinning cryptographers networks, and several electronic voting protocols. During our analysis, we uncover previously unknown vulnerabilities in two popular electronic voting protocols from the literature. The high overhead associated with verifying security protocols, in conjunction with the fact that protocols are rarely run in isolation, has created a demand for modular verification techniques. In our protocol analysis framework, we give a series of composition results for safety and indistinguishability properties of randomized security protocols. Finally, we study the model checking problem for the probabilistic objects that lie at the heart of our protocol semantics. In particular, we present a novel technique that allows for the precise verification of probabilistic computation tree logic (PCTL) properties of discrete time Markov chains (DTMCs) and Markov decision processes (MDPs) at scale. Although our motivation comes from protocol analysis, the techniques further verification capabilities in many application areas. Advisors/Committee Members: Viswanathan, Mahesh (advisor), Viswanathan, Mahesh (Committee Chair), Meseguer, Jose (committee member), Bates, Adam (committee member), Chadha, Rohit (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Symbolic verification; Dolev-Yao attacker; Randomized security protocols

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bauer, M. S. (2018). Analysis of randomized security protocols. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102456

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bauer, Matthew Steven. “Analysis of randomized security protocols.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed July 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102456.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bauer, Matthew Steven. “Analysis of randomized security protocols.” 2018. Web. 24 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Bauer MS. Analysis of randomized security protocols. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2018. [cited 2019 Jul 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102456.

Council of Science Editors:

Bauer MS. Analysis of randomized security protocols. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102456


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

2. Duggirala, Parasara Sridhar. Dynamic analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems.

Degree: PhD, Computer Science, 2015, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

With the recent advances in communication and computation technologies, integration of software into the sensing, actuation, and control is common. This has lead to a new branch of study called Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS). Avionics, automotives, power grid, medical devices, and robotics are a few examples of such systems. As these systems are part of critical infrastructure, it is very important to ensure that these systems function reliably without any failures. While testing improves confidence in these systems, it does not establish the absence of scenarios where the system fails. The focus of this thesis is on formal verification techniques for cyber-physical systems that prove the absence of errors in a given system. In particular, this thesis focuses on {\em dynamic analysis} techniques that bridge the gap between testing and verification. This thesis uses the framework of hybrid input output automata for modeling CPS. Formal verification of hybrid automata is undecidable in general. Because of the undecidability result, no algorithm is guaranteed to terminate for all models. This thesis focuses on developing heuristics for verification that exploit sample executions of the system. Moreover, the goal of the dynamic analysis techniques proposed in this thesis is to ensure that the techniques are sound, i.e., they always return the right answer, and they are relatively complete, i.e., the techniques terminate when the system satisfies certain special conditions. For undecidable problems, such theoretical guarantees are the strongest that can be expected out of any automatic procedure. This thesis focuses on safety properties, which require that nothing bad happens. In particular we consider invariant and temporal precedence properties; temporal precedence properties ensure that the temporal ordering of certain events in every execution satisfy a given specification. This thesis introduces the notion of a discrepancy function that aids in dynamic analysis of CPS. Informally, these discrepancy functions capture the convergence or divergence of continuous behaviors in CPS systems. In control theory, several proof certificates such as contraction metric and incremental stability have been proposed to capture the convergence and divergence of solutions of ordinary differential equations. This thesis establishes that discrepancy functions generalize such proof certificates. Further, this thesis also proposes a new technique to compute discrepancy functions for continuous systems with linear ODEs from sample executions. One of the main contributions of this thesis is a technique to compute an over-approximation of the set of reachable states using sample executions and discrepancy functions. Using the reachability computation technique, this thesis proposes a safety verification algorithm which is proved to be sound and relatively complete. This technique is implemented in a tool called, Compare-Execute-Check-Engine (C2E2) and experimental results show that it is scalable. To demonstrate the… Advisors/Committee Members: Viswanathan, Mahesh (advisor), Mitra, Sayan (advisor), Viswanathan, Mahesh (Committee Chair), Mitra, Sayan (Committee Chair), Meseguer, Jose (committee member), Alur, Rajeev (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Formal Methods; Verification; Cyber-Physical Systems; Hybrid Systems; Safety Verification; Reachable Set; Over-approximations; Dynamic Analysis; Discrepancy Function; Control Theory; Contraction Metric; Incremental Stability; Incremental Lyapunov Function; Adjacent Landing Alerting System (ALAS); Temporal Precedence Properties; Powertrain Control System; Signal Temporal Logic; Distributed Predicates; Parallel Landing Protocol

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Duggirala, P. S. (2015). Dynamic analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/89104

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Duggirala, Parasara Sridhar. “Dynamic analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed July 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/89104.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Duggirala, Parasara Sridhar. “Dynamic analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems.” 2015. Web. 24 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Duggirala PS. Dynamic analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/89104.

Council of Science Editors:

Duggirala PS. Dynamic analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/89104

3. Moon, Lori Ann. Modal auxiliary verbs and contexts.

Degree: PhD, Linguistics, 2016, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Modal auxiliary verbs, such as `could', `might', `must', `would', and others, have different readings depending on the context in which they occur (Kratzer 1981). The sentence `Jess could fry the fish' can mean that, in a time previous to the utterance of the sentence, Jess had the ability to fry the fish, or it can mean that, at the time of the utterance, Jess frying the fish is a possible event. Modal auxiliary verbs often create intensional environments, leading the events described by the second verb to be understood to be non-actual events. When the readings are described as being determined by a context, it is often a broad notion of non-linguistic and extra-sentential linguistic context that is the focus of the interpretation. For example, descriptive pragmatic constraints are used in Lewis 1973 and Kratzer 1981 to characterize types of accessibility relations and types of orderings of worlds. A large part of the meaning of modal auxiliary verbs, however, centers around how the events described by the second verb are situated relative to the time at which the sentence containing the modal auxiliary is used. Information about the temporal situation of an event is conveyed through the linguistic context in which a modal auxiliary verb occurs, including, but not limited to, lexical properties of the linguistic expressions describing the event in the scope of the modal auxiliary, lexical properties of the modal auxiliary itself, and temporal and aspectual marking on linguistic expressions in the verbal projections. In order to provide a framework for representing the interactions of tense, aspect, and modality, a fragment of English is given in a Multi-Modal Combinatorial Categorial Grammar (Baldridge & Kruijff, Steedman 2012). Modal auxiliaries are given verb-like lexical entries in the grammar using lexical entries that combine features from Villavicenio 2002 and standard attribute value matrices of Head Driven Phrase Structure Grammar (Pollard & Sag 1999, Sag, Wasow, & Bender 2003). Modal auxiliaries have default lexical arguments with which they combine, and they combine with temporal and aspectual meaning that is sometimes morphologically manifested through grammatical tense and aspect. Portions of the combinatory methods are based on Bach 1983, who argued for less constrained combinatorial rules and unification of features in order to represent modal auxiliaries. The notion of event semantics (Davidson 1967) plays an important role in the formulation of the compositional semantics due to the way in which event times are related to aspectual meaning. The grammar uses a Neo-Davidsonian approach (Parsons 1990) to representing the arguments of the verb and builds on the work of Champollion 2015. The temporal component is very important in this work and uses portions of the temporal and event ontology proposed in Muskens 1995, 2003. Two paradigms of modal auxiliaries are proposed: Tense-bearing modal auxiliaries and non-tense-bearing modal auxiliaries. Within each paradigm, readings are shown to… Advisors/Committee Members: Lasersohn, Peter N (advisor), Lasersohn, Peter N (Committee Chair), Ionin, Tania (committee member), Schreiner, Sylvia L. R. (committee member), Meseguer, Jose (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: formal semantics; formal grammar; pragmatics; syntax; modal auxiliary verbs; tense; aspect; epistemic modality; relativist semantics; relativism; assessment-sensitivity; categorial grammar; English; context; model theoretic semantics; intensional logic; natural language semantics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moon, L. A. (2016). Modal auxiliary verbs and contexts. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95332

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moon, Lori Ann. “Modal auxiliary verbs and contexts.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed July 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95332.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moon, Lori Ann. “Modal auxiliary verbs and contexts.” 2016. Web. 24 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Moon LA. Modal auxiliary verbs and contexts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. [cited 2019 Jul 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95332.

Council of Science Editors:

Moon LA. Modal auxiliary verbs and contexts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95332

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