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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Lichtenberger, Eric"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Taylor, Jason. Community college dual credit: differential participation and differential impacts on college access and completion.

Degree: PhD, 0209, 2013, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This study examines the impact of dual credit policy at the time dual credit was beginning to take hold in Illinois, using a large cohort of students who completed high school in spring 2003. The research sought to answer critical questions about the average outcomes of students participating in dual credit and the average outcomes of sub-samples of students of color and low-income students participating in dual credit. It relies on theoretical constructs associated with Perna and Thomas’ (2008) Conceptual Model of Student Success and uses a descriptive and quasi-experimental design. Propensity score matching is used to estimate the impact of student participation in community college dual credit courses during the senior year of high school on two outcomes: college enrollment and college completion. Propensity score matching, a robust technique for reducing bias using observational data (Rosenbaum & Rubin, 1983; 1984), is used to estimate the average treatment effect on the treated (ATT) for the whole sample. Inspired by Rawls’ (1999) notion of justice as fairness, the differential impacts of dual credit participation are examined on sub-samples of students of color and low-income students. To do this, and to determine if there is effect heterogeneity in the ATT estimates, propensity score matching is used to analyze results for the sub-samples of students of color and low-income students. Results show the impact of community college dual credit taken during the senior year of high school has a statistically significant impact on students’ chances of enrolling in college and completing college, on average. Results of the propensity score matching analysis also suggest that, on average, dual credit students of color and low-income students are more likely to enroll in college and complete college compared to the matched sample of non-dual credit students of color and low-income students. However, using Rawls’ (1999) notion of justice as fairness and his difference principle as a standard, the existing dual credit policy in Illinois does not benefit students of color and low-income students equally. That is, relative to the average of the full matched sample of dual credit students that consists mostly of White middle- and upper-income students, the sub-samples of underserved students participating in dual credit do not access college and complete college at the same rates. Results of this study provide baseline data for the effectiveness of Illinois’ dual credit policy, but the policy landscape has changed since 2002-2003. The results suggest that dual credit policy has benefits for students but falls short when data are analyzed using Rawls’ fairness principle. Future research should replicate this study using more recent data to examine how and if policy changes since 2002-2003 have impacted the effect of dual credit. Advisors/Committee Members: Bragg, Debra D. (advisor), Bragg, Debra D. (Committee Chair), Baber, Lorenzo D. (committee member), Ikenberry, Stanley O. (committee member), Robinson-Cimpian, Joseph P. (committee member), Lichtenberger, Eric (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Dual credit; Community college; Equity; Illinois; College access; College completion

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APA (6th Edition):

Taylor, J. (2013). Community college dual credit: differential participation and differential impacts on college access and completion. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/44429

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taylor, Jason. “Community college dual credit: differential participation and differential impacts on college access and completion.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/44429.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taylor, Jason. “Community college dual credit: differential participation and differential impacts on college access and completion.” 2013. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Taylor J. Community college dual credit: differential participation and differential impacts on college access and completion. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/44429.

Council of Science Editors:

Taylor J. Community college dual credit: differential participation and differential impacts on college access and completion. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/44429


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

2. Houston, Derek Anthony. Essays on understanding post-secondary preparation and matriculation of high school students relative to differential public school contexts.

Degree: PhD, Educational Policy Studies, 2016, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This study includes consists of three essays in which I demonstrate that high school contexts are related to the postsecondary preparation, entrance, and matriculation of high school students, particularly for underrepresented populations. My inquiry utilizes comprehensive state longitudinal data, nationally representative longitudinal data, and national school fiscal data, along with quantitative methods to examine these relationships. The dissertation relies on two statistical methods and two unique data sources. Utilizing multilevel modeling and state longitudinal data, the first paper examines the results of school funding policies and the extent to which school funding is related to the postsecondary preparation and matriculation of students. The results suggest that per-pupil revenue is related to an increase in ACT math scores, likelihood of four-year post-secondary enrollment, and four-year post-secondary degree attainment. Utilizing the same Illinois high school data and propensity-score matching techniques, the second paper explores the relationship between a high school’s average teacher quality and the postsecondary preparation and matriculation of students identified as Black and Latino. The findings indicate that, for Black and Latino students that attended schools with above-average or higher teachers, ACT math scores are higher and the likelihood of enrollment in a four-year post-secondary institution is greater. Finally, utilizing a nationally representative sample of data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:02), supplemented with Common Core Data, and propensity-score matching, the third paper examines the extent to which the intersection of student socioeconomic status and school quality is related to post-secondary matriculation. For students identified as being from a low socioeconomic background, attending a higher quality school is related to an increase in the likelihood for both two- and four-year post-secondary enrollment. Taken together, the three essays provide further evidence that increases in school resources, whether it be funding, teachers, or in general, are related to educational achievement, and, more specifically, the likelihood of underrepresented students advancing to and progressing through post-secondary institutions. Advisors/Committee Members: Trent, William T (advisor), Trent, William T (Committee Chair), Lubienski, Sarah T (committee member), Baber, Lorenzo D (committee member), Lichtenberger, Eric (committee member), Robinson-Cimpian, Joseph P (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: P-20 Pipeline; School Resources; Post-secondary outcomes; Longitudinal Data

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Houston, D. A. (2016). Essays on understanding post-secondary preparation and matriculation of high school students relative to differential public school contexts. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90901

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Houston, Derek Anthony. “Essays on understanding post-secondary preparation and matriculation of high school students relative to differential public school contexts.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90901.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Houston, Derek Anthony. “Essays on understanding post-secondary preparation and matriculation of high school students relative to differential public school contexts.” 2016. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Houston DA. Essays on understanding post-secondary preparation and matriculation of high school students relative to differential public school contexts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90901.

Council of Science Editors:

Houston DA. Essays on understanding post-secondary preparation and matriculation of high school students relative to differential public school contexts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90901

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