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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Irwin, David"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Clevenger, John. The benefits of getting horizontal.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

The goal of much research in vision is to better understand the mechanisms of attention. This is often accomplished by using models of attention to predict how the placement of stimuli on a computer screen will affect task difficulty. However, recent research has shown there are asymmetries in visual sensitivity across different locations of the visual field and also that there might be interactions between attention and sensitivity across different locations in the visual field. We discuss the potential significance of these asymmetries for attention research, focusing on the possibility of an attentional advantage for targets appearing horizontal to an invalid exogenous cue. We review previous literature concerning this potential horizontal advantage and then describe seven experiments related to it. Experiments 1 and 2 find an advantage for targets appearing horizontal, rather than diagonal, to an invalid cue in a visual display similar to those used in the classic Posner cueing paradigm. Experiments 3 and 4 provide evidence of an advantage for horizontal targets in a display similar to those used in the object-based attention literature. Experiment 5 attempted to determine whether flanking non-targets are necessary to observe a horizontal advantage, but ended up not providing much information. Experiments 6 and 7 attempted to test between two models of the horizontal advantage and, while perhaps ruling one out, do not provide clean evidence for any. In the end, we conclude that the evidence for the horizontal advantage is strong, though there is still much to learn about. Advisors/Committee Members: Beck, Diane (advisor), Beck, Diane (Committee Chair), Simons, Daniel (committee member), Gratton, Gabriele (committee member), Hummel, John (committee member), Irwin, David (committee member), Lleras, Alejandro (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Attention; Vision; Visual Field; Attentional Cueing; Horizontal Advantage; Visual Attention; Posner Cueing Task; Object-Based Attention; Symmetry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clevenger, J. (2017). The benefits of getting horizontal. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99402

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clevenger, John. “The benefits of getting horizontal.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99402.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clevenger, John. “The benefits of getting horizontal.” 2017. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Clevenger J. The benefits of getting horizontal. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99402.

Council of Science Editors:

Clevenger J. The benefits of getting horizontal. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99402

2. Cronin, Deborah A. Visual working memory supports perceptual stability across saccadic eye movements.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2018, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Vision is suppressed during saccadic eye movements. To create a stable perception of the visual world we must stitch together the gaps in visual input caused by this suppression. Early theories of perceptual stability proposed that information about the position of the eye could be used to cancel out changes in the retinal information resulting from a saccade. In contrast, more contemporary theories have proposed that perceptual stability relies on object correspondence across saccades, perhaps limited to the saccade target alone. According to these views, the visual system encodes features of the saccade target object into visual working memory (VWM) before a saccade is made. After the saccade, participants attempt to locate those features within a small region near the fovea. If this locating process succeeds, perceptual stability is maintained. The present study investigated directly whether perceptual stability does indeed rely on VWM. If it does, then perceived stability should be impaired when VWM is loaded with other visual information. Six experiments were conducted in which participants detected saccade target displacements while simultaneously maintaining a VWM or auditory working memory load (AWM). The VWM load negatively impacted participants’ ability to detect saccade target displacements and the saccade target displacement task negatively impacted memory for VWM task items. Neither of these effects were apparent when AWM was loaded. These results support the hypothesis that visual working memory supports perceptual stability across saccadic eye movements. Advisors/Committee Members: Irwin, David E. (advisor), Irwin, David E. (Committee Chair), Lleras, Alejandro (committee member), Buetti, Simona (committee member), Beck, Diane M. (committee member), Christianson, Kiel (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: eye movements; saccades; visual working memory; transsaccadic memory; perceptual stability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cronin, D. A. (2018). Visual working memory supports perceptual stability across saccadic eye movements. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101459

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cronin, Deborah A. “Visual working memory supports perceptual stability across saccadic eye movements.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101459.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cronin, Deborah A. “Visual working memory supports perceptual stability across saccadic eye movements.” 2018. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Cronin DA. Visual working memory supports perceptual stability across saccadic eye movements. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101459.

Council of Science Editors:

Cronin DA. Visual working memory supports perceptual stability across saccadic eye movements. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101459

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