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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Hart, Matthew"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Riede, Austin N. Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939.

Degree: PhD, 0311, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

A revealing legend from the First World War told of a tribe of deserters from all armies that had reverted to a pre-political ???state of nature,??? living beneath no-man???s-land in abandoned trenches and pillaging corpses in the night. This tale inspires the under-examined question that is central to my dissertation: how did the First World War alter English citizens??? relation to political power at its most basic level? Literary scholars have read interwar literature as an attempt to work through war trauma, and they have focused on the transformative cultural changes the war brought about. The field has not, however, given sustained attention to the threat that the war posed to established models of governmental and political legitimation, even though Westminster acknowledged the threat in unprecedented legislative interventions. Through readings of familiar and unfamiliar interwar literature, my dissertation analyzes how Britons constituted themselves as objects of state power during a culturally and psychologically fragmenting state of emergency. Drawing on such archival material as letters, diaries, parliamentary debates, medical treatises, and self-help books, my dissertation shows how state power administered British bodies and minds through the inter-related sites of law, medicine, and labor. My first chapter, ???Character, Power, and Britain???s Emergency Measures,??? argues that the political philosophy concepts of the sovereign decision, biopower, and governmentality can help us better understand the cultural and literary production of the interwar years. During the 1914-18 war, the British government took exceptional and extralegal measures that citizens generally supported or took for granted. In retrospect, interwar writers engaged sometimes paradoxical questions of citizens??? roles, rights, and obligations in a liberal state engaged in total war. This chapter demonstrates that writers and observers often worked through the fundamental political problem of the sources and limits of state power presented by the war, and the way the war changed the interface between the citizen and the state, by referring to changes in both personal and national ???character,??? which constituted a complex and often contradictory nexus of social and political codes. Chapter 2, ???Corporeal Law: Community, Memory, and the Missing Subject??? focuses on the The Defence of the Realm Act (1914) and related legislation. These laws disrupted forms of communal, cultural and political identification across geographic and economic lines. In Scottish novelist Lewis Grassic Gibbon???s Sunset Song (1932) and T.S. Eliot???s The Waste Land (1922), communal disruptions produce self-alienated subjects who struggle to stabilize a sense of self among contradictory cultural and political demands. Gibbon???s novel is an imaginative recreation of how wartime legislation compelled isolated rural communities to form permanent new relationships to the state through the violent appropriation of natural resources and rural labor. The Waste… Advisors/Committee Members: Goodlad, Lauren (advisor), Goodlad, Lauren (Committee Chair), Hart, Matthew (Committee Chair), Hansen, James A. (committee member), Esty, Jed (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Power; Character; Interwar; T.S. Eliot; Lewis Grassic Gibbon; Rebecca West; Virginia Woolf; Vera Brittain; David Jones; Thomas Stearns Eliot

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APA (6th Edition):

Riede, A. N. (2012). Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29425

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Riede, Austin N. “Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29425.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Riede, Austin N. “Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939.” 2012. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Riede AN. Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29425.

Council of Science Editors:

Riede AN. Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29425

2. Lown-Hecht, Tania. Adrift at home: National belonging and narrative form in the rooms of twentieth-century British fiction.

Degree: PhD, 0311, 2014, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation examines representations of interior space in twentieth-century British and Irish texts, where the question of “home” has an urgency that is particular to a century in which personal and national spaces underwent extraordinary transformation. I examine national change at the level of the interior room, where characters expressly or tacitly pursue a stable home, even as the rooms that constitute their houses are increasingly drafty, mobile, and unsettled. In novels by Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bowen, J.G. Farrell, Jean Rhys, Sam Selvon, Doris Lessing, and W.G. Sebald, I analyze how representations of destabilized interior spaces are mobilized on behalf of larger arguments about imperial politics in which the relatively stable framework of national identity in the nineteenth century gives way to a more dispersed and disrupted sense of Englishness in the twentieth century. The novels I read stage a conflict between the house as a secure space of the nation or national symbolic, and the house as a space unsettled by colonial encounters, war, and immigration. Political upheaval is not merely experienced in but enacted through domestic space, where the room becomes a site of national conflict and occasionally the source of military, imperial, or political power. Through their representation of unsettled interiors, these novels critique “territorial nationalism” as a key geographical construct that delineates subjectivity. In these novels, the “home” is disoriented in both its material forms (the house) and metaphorical forms (citizenship and national affiliation). In the twentieth century, changes to interior life give rise to changes in literary form. The representation of rooms as bounded but continually changing spaces works as a critique of realist form, which presupposes more stable versions of subjectivity and more stable narrative forms. These novels offer an alterative model that privileges fluidity, instability, and unsettledness. The room offers a distinctive metaphorical territory for novelists because as an enclosed but fluid space, it can simultaneously work as a metaphor for England’s unsettled national interior space, for the space of the novel, and for the interior space of the mind. Space was once considered the sphere of fixity and solidity, in contrast to time, which was conceived as boundless and unstable; in the last few decades, human geography has countered these assumptions to show that space is also a sphere of heterogeneity. The novels I read both anticipate and critique human geography by representing interior spaces as at once stable and shifting. That is, rather than present interior spaces as endlessly in flux, they show interior space as a site of tension between the desire for solidity and the reality of continuous change. These fictional rooms work to expose how spaces that are assumed to be coherent, closed, and safe are unstable, open, shifting. The breakdown of the solidity of the room is enacted through the breakdown of the stability of the realist narrative.… Advisors/Committee Members: Hart, Matthew (advisor), Mahaffey, Vicki (Committee Chair), Hart, Matthew (committee member), Burton, Antoinette M. (committee member), Gaedtke, Andrew (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: space; Geography; literature; narrative form; british; anglo-irish; postcolonial; houses; housing; empire

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lown-Hecht, T. (2014). Adrift at home: National belonging and narrative form in the rooms of twentieth-century British fiction. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49381

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lown-Hecht, Tania. “Adrift at home: National belonging and narrative form in the rooms of twentieth-century British fiction.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49381.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lown-Hecht, Tania. “Adrift at home: National belonging and narrative form in the rooms of twentieth-century British fiction.” 2014. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lown-Hecht T. Adrift at home: National belonging and narrative form in the rooms of twentieth-century British fiction. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49381.

Council of Science Editors:

Lown-Hecht T. Adrift at home: National belonging and narrative form in the rooms of twentieth-century British fiction. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49381

3. Lee, Merton. Asian American poetry, American poetry, and the critique of identity: Asian American poetry in comparative context, 1887-2005.

Degree: PhD, 0311, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

In this dissertation I attempt a critical evaluation of identity. While I see identity, in the sense of the social categorization of individuals, as a discourse that perpetuates the kind of reduction that impoverishes conceptions of those labeled as “others,” ultimately, identity can’t simply be dismissed. My analysis begins with Asian American poets who I see as challenging the different forms that racism takes across more than a century of Asian American writing. But I go on to suggest that the form these critiques take connect them to the work of American poets who outside of race, seek to contest the reduction of a sense of the full multiplicity of personhood, that is, they defend a certain democratic understand of self. The first half of my dissertation consists of two chapters that critique identity by appealing to selfhood. My first chapter reads the work of Walt Whitman and Sadakichi Hartmann in the context of Chinese Exclusion. I argue that Chinese Exclusion results in a social death, in that “Oriental” immigrants were defined as not possessing the full social existence conferred by legal rights. Thus I read Hartmann’s early work as a kind of late work; he draws on late Whitman, who he knew. Both poets focus on the fragmentary and personal to object to a presumption that individuals can be known or totalized, which therefore also rejects race and identity. Similarly, my second chapter shows that Marianne Moore and José Garcia Villa’s poetry, directed toward creating what I call the “didactic subject,” is meant to challenge the kind of assumptions that subsume individuals under categories of identity. The didactic subject is a form of self understood to be self-critical and in process, and thus ethical. But in the context of US colonization of the Philippines, which took a tutelary form, conceiving the self as unfinished risks repeating notions of racial atavism and makes the didactic subject an ambivalent, possibly compromised form of critique. The two chapters comprising the second half of my dissertation reflect a shift away from challenging identity to appropriating it. My third chapter argues that the poetry of David Rafael Wang and Amiri Baraka attempts to naturalize identity to personality by invoking intensely subjective experiences, pain and sex, as proof for the reality of racial identity. But since race must be constructed to define selfhood, alternative notions of the self have to be disavowed. My final chapter proposes an understanding of identity as multiple, through a critique not just of identity but also the self. In it, I suggest that what Whitman undertakes in 1955, a grounding of identity in the multiplicity of simultaneous experience is affirmed in the postmodern poetry of Linh Dinh. Dinh’s work suggests that the multiplicity of identity can’t be affirmed, except asymptotically, as a horizon. That model of identity, multiple and never attainable describes identity’s continued significance in understanding not only the social, but the personal. Advisors/Committee Members: Nelson, Cary (advisor), Nelson, Cary (Committee Chair), Chai, Leon (committee member), Cacho, Lisa M. (committee member), Hart, Matthew (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Asian American Poetry; Identity; American Poetry; Ethnicity; Race

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Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee, M. (2012). Asian American poetry, American poetry, and the critique of identity: Asian American poetry in comparative context, 1887-2005. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34214

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Merton. “Asian American poetry, American poetry, and the critique of identity: Asian American poetry in comparative context, 1887-2005.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34214.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Merton. “Asian American poetry, American poetry, and the critique of identity: Asian American poetry in comparative context, 1887-2005.” 2012. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lee M. Asian American poetry, American poetry, and the critique of identity: Asian American poetry in comparative context, 1887-2005. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34214.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee M. Asian American poetry, American poetry, and the critique of identity: Asian American poetry in comparative context, 1887-2005. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34214

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