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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Greene, Jennifer"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Mustafaa, Rafiqah. How university-based poverty research centers aim to inform antipoverty policy and practice.

Degree: PhD, Educational Policy Studies, 2017, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation describes the activities of two university-based poverty research centers in the United States—the Center for Research on Poverty in Society (CRPS), and the Regional Poverty Research Center (RPRC). Using a multiple case study approach, at each center, the study included document analysis; interviews with 5 individuals including the center director; and observations of relevant center activities. The primary question the study answered is: “how do university-based poverty research centers in the United States aim to inform antipoverty policy and practice”? While prior research has examined the relationship between social research and social policy, and though poverty research centers greatly shape our understanding of poverty causes, consequences, and solutions, my searches have not yielded a body of literature that examines such centers as important producers of policy-relevant research. This dissertation presents important findings on six aspects of the two centers’ policy-relevant activities: 1) guiding rationale, 2) research characteristics, 3) research dissemination, 4) activities to train and support scholars, 5) activities to facilitate research-policy-practice partnerships, and 6) contextual factors shaping the centers’ work. The study found that each center took a different approach to inform antipoverty policy and practice—CRPS is primarily concerned with developing an infrastructure for measuring poverty and inequality and RPRC is primarily concerned with bringing together people who have an interest in addressing social issues related to poverty and inequality. A range of contextual factors seemed to shape each center’s work including institutional setting, sources of funding, societal conversations about poverty, and the background of individuals who play a role in shaping the center’s work. This dissertation contributes to literature on the research-policy relationship by describing the work of two producers of poverty research. It also contributes to literature on university-based research centers by exploring centers in the social sciences. Finally, the study provides an up-to-date profile of poverty research conducted and supported by two important poverty research producers in the U.S.. Advisors/Committee Members: McNair-Barnett, Bernice (advisor), Trent, William (Committee Chair), Greene, Jennifer (committee member), Anderson, James (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Research-policy relationship; Poverty research; Antipoverty policy; University-based research center

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mustafaa, R. (2017). How university-based poverty research centers aim to inform antipoverty policy and practice. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97328

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mustafaa, Rafiqah. “How university-based poverty research centers aim to inform antipoverty policy and practice.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97328.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mustafaa, Rafiqah. “How university-based poverty research centers aim to inform antipoverty policy and practice.” 2017. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Mustafaa R. How university-based poverty research centers aim to inform antipoverty policy and practice. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97328.

Council of Science Editors:

Mustafaa R. How university-based poverty research centers aim to inform antipoverty policy and practice. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97328


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

2. Sudibyo, Leonardus Eko. Narratives of teacher professional learning in Indonesia.

Degree: PhD, Curriculum and Instruction, 2018, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This research was a narrative study of the professional learning of workshop leaders, that is, senior teachers whose professional growth prepared them to share their learning with other teachers. Six participants in this study made up three cases. Case 1 included three workshop leaders in an IB-PYP school. Case 2 was two workshop leaders who were previous IB-PYP workshop leaders but then worked in two separate non-IB private schools. Case 3 was a non-IB workshop leader who taught in a private religious-affiliated school. All participants took ownership of their growth, which motivated them to share their learning with other teachers. Sharing what they had learned with others increased their professional development as well. In all three cases, professional learning was motivated by varied institutional support. In Case 1, the progressive pedagogy and professional development of the IB-PYP school supported these teachers’ professional learning. In Case 2, the two participants also were provided professional development opportunities within an IB-PYP school to become workshop leaders; after 4-5 years they moved to two different private elementary schools as a senior teacher and a principal; they continued offering workshops for teachers in non-IB schools. They were anxious to share the progressive best practices learned in their IB programs. In Case 3, the participant benefitted from reflective practices in his religious high school and he conducted extensive workshops, wrote for numerous newspapers, offered lectures at university, and published many books to share what he had learned. In all three cases, these workshop leaders learned a great deal that they then felt committed to share with other teachers. They all embodied an expression provided by the Case 3 teacher, namely nemo dat quod non habet (Latin), one cannot give what one does not have. Based on their own learning, all of these workshop leaders felt strongly motivated to help teachers in ways that would provide more progressive teaching and better learning for students. This study revealed three shared elements of these teachers’ professional learning, (a) their professional development occurred within sustainable support structures, (b) they took ownership of own growth, and (c) they engaged in cycles of growth and sharing, and reflection and action, that extended their development. This study also revealed different levels of engagement in critical thinking that has implications for Indonesian education more broadly. Advisors/Committee Members: Parsons, Marilyn (advisor), Parsons, Marilyn (Committee Chair), Herrera, Linda (committee member), Greene, Jennifer (committee member), McCarthy, Cameron (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Narratives; Teacher leader; Workshop leader; Teacher professional learning; Critical thinking; Education reform; Indonesian education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sudibyo, L. E. (2018). Narratives of teacher professional learning in Indonesia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102381

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sudibyo, Leonardus Eko. “Narratives of teacher professional learning in Indonesia.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102381.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sudibyo, Leonardus Eko. “Narratives of teacher professional learning in Indonesia.” 2018. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Sudibyo LE. Narratives of teacher professional learning in Indonesia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102381.

Council of Science Editors:

Sudibyo LE. Narratives of teacher professional learning in Indonesia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/102381

3. Adamson, Brynn Clairisse. The role of exercise in negotiating an identity as disabled: A qualitative exploration of the experiences of individuals with multiple sclerosis.

Degree: PhD, Kinesiology, 2018, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic condition resulting in a wide range of physical, cognitive and affective impairments that can either fluctuate, or remain and worsen depending upon the disease course. The episodic nature of symptoms in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) results in an in-between or liminal embodiment; situated in-between sick and well states, ‘able-bodied’ and disabled. Because of this, MS has a tenuous relationship to the field of Disability Studies and mainstream disability activism. Furthermore, the recent surge in research on the impact of exercise/physical activity (PA) participation on symptoms and quality of life among those with MS has shifted exercise and PA promotion to individuals with MS in ways that reinforce ableist ideas about the human body (e.g. for managing or minimizing impairment/disability). This increasingly medicalized version of exercise promotion can cause increased guilt over inactivity, and result in constrained views of PA that may be compounded by the uncertain nature of having MS and negotiating a disabled identity. Thus, it is important to further explore the relationship between MS, exercise and Disability Studies. PURPOSE: This dissertation explores the myriad and contradictory ways that individuals with MS perceive exercise and physical activity as part of their self-care, as well as the ways that exercise and physical activity are used to negotiate an identity as disabled. METHODS: The aims of the current analysis are to explore the roles of exercise and physical activity in their MS management and prevention of disability. I use Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to analyze interviews from two previously conducted qualitative research projects related to exercise and MS. The first (RELAPSE) is an exploration of the experiences and concerns related to physical activity of individuals with MS following a relapse. The second study (PEMS) is a photoelicitation project focusing on the people, places, and things that influence physical activity behavior among adults with MS. RESULTS: I identify eight themes relevant to my original research questions which are organized into three categories: Exercise, Identity, and Disability. The Exercise category describes orientations to exercise as a disciplinary activity, as promoting self-transformation and social engagement, and as medicine for managing MS and for self-care. The Identity category describes notions of fractured self-concept across a multitude of dualisms, as well as the ambiguity of embodied experiences relative to health and disability. The Disability category explores experiences with and perspectives of ableism, the use of assistive devices, and the development of a disability identity. Overall, participants describe many different roles that exercise occupies for them, as well as different orientations and motivations for engaging in exercise. This contributes to a fractured self-concept across a variety of continuums, including mind/body, old self/new self, MS self/true self, and… Advisors/Committee Members: Littlefield, Melissa M. (advisor), Littlefield, Melissa M. (Committee Chair), Motl, Robert W. (committee member), Sydnor, Synthia (committee member), Greene, Jennifer C. (committee member), Beauchamp, Toby C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Exercise; medicalization; disability; multiple sclerosis; interpretative phenomenological analysis; disability identity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Adamson, B. C. (2018). The role of exercise in negotiating an identity as disabled: A qualitative exploration of the experiences of individuals with multiple sclerosis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101502

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Adamson, Brynn Clairisse. “The role of exercise in negotiating an identity as disabled: A qualitative exploration of the experiences of individuals with multiple sclerosis.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101502.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Adamson, Brynn Clairisse. “The role of exercise in negotiating an identity as disabled: A qualitative exploration of the experiences of individuals with multiple sclerosis.” 2018. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Adamson BC. The role of exercise in negotiating an identity as disabled: A qualitative exploration of the experiences of individuals with multiple sclerosis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101502.

Council of Science Editors:

Adamson BC. The role of exercise in negotiating an identity as disabled: A qualitative exploration of the experiences of individuals with multiple sclerosis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/101502

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