Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Esty, Jed"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Jernigan, Brandon. "Forms of Some Intenser Life": Genre and Imperialism at the Turn of the Century.

Degree: PhD, 0311, 2011, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

My dissertation establishes a critical dialogue between two distinct phenomena at the turn of the twentieth century: first, the exponential growth and mercurial nature of novelistic genres and, secondly, the emergence of modern global consciousness. Experimentations with genre, I argue, allowed writers to develop new narrative forms capable of representing an increasingly global, interdependent, and actively anti- imperialist world. Thus, this project specifically addresses late-nineteenth- and early- twentieth-century fiction that participates in or combines multiple genres, including Joseph Conrad???s The Nigger of the ???Narcissus??? and The Inheritors (with Ford Madox Ford), H. G. Wells???s Tono-Bungay, Bram Stoker???s The Snake???s Pass, and Algernon Blackwood???s ???The Willows.??? This concentration of generic discontinuities not only demonstrates genre???s formal instability but also its inability to function as a symbolic solution to the real socio-economic contradictions of empire. While these texts reflect the stress-fractures of expanding imperial sovereignty, they can hardly be read as outright critiques of imperial rule. Instead, they operate dialectically. They are unstable yet flexible. Though discontinuous texts thwart generic expectations, they also offer systems of flexibility that express and potentially manage imperial crises. Advisors/Committee Members: Valente, Joseph (advisor), Valente, Joseph (Committee Chair), Esty, Jed (committee member), Goodlad, Lauren (committee member), Hansen, James A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Imperialism; Genre; Novel; Insurgency; Weird Fiction; Conrad, Joseph; Wells, H. G.; Stoker, Bram; Blackwood, Algernon

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jernigan, B. (2011). "Forms of Some Intenser Life": Genre and Imperialism at the Turn of the Century. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/18242

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jernigan, Brandon. “"Forms of Some Intenser Life": Genre and Imperialism at the Turn of the Century.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/18242.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jernigan, Brandon. “"Forms of Some Intenser Life": Genre and Imperialism at the Turn of the Century.” 2011. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Jernigan B. "Forms of Some Intenser Life": Genre and Imperialism at the Turn of the Century. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2011. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/18242.

Council of Science Editors:

Jernigan B. "Forms of Some Intenser Life": Genre and Imperialism at the Turn of the Century. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/18242


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

2. Riede, Austin N. Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939.

Degree: PhD, 0311, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

A revealing legend from the First World War told of a tribe of deserters from all armies that had reverted to a pre-political ???state of nature,??? living beneath no-man???s-land in abandoned trenches and pillaging corpses in the night. This tale inspires the under-examined question that is central to my dissertation: how did the First World War alter English citizens??? relation to political power at its most basic level? Literary scholars have read interwar literature as an attempt to work through war trauma, and they have focused on the transformative cultural changes the war brought about. The field has not, however, given sustained attention to the threat that the war posed to established models of governmental and political legitimation, even though Westminster acknowledged the threat in unprecedented legislative interventions. Through readings of familiar and unfamiliar interwar literature, my dissertation analyzes how Britons constituted themselves as objects of state power during a culturally and psychologically fragmenting state of emergency. Drawing on such archival material as letters, diaries, parliamentary debates, medical treatises, and self-help books, my dissertation shows how state power administered British bodies and minds through the inter-related sites of law, medicine, and labor. My first chapter, ???Character, Power, and Britain???s Emergency Measures,??? argues that the political philosophy concepts of the sovereign decision, biopower, and governmentality can help us better understand the cultural and literary production of the interwar years. During the 1914-18 war, the British government took exceptional and extralegal measures that citizens generally supported or took for granted. In retrospect, interwar writers engaged sometimes paradoxical questions of citizens??? roles, rights, and obligations in a liberal state engaged in total war. This chapter demonstrates that writers and observers often worked through the fundamental political problem of the sources and limits of state power presented by the war, and the way the war changed the interface between the citizen and the state, by referring to changes in both personal and national ???character,??? which constituted a complex and often contradictory nexus of social and political codes. Chapter 2, ???Corporeal Law: Community, Memory, and the Missing Subject??? focuses on the The Defence of the Realm Act (1914) and related legislation. These laws disrupted forms of communal, cultural and political identification across geographic and economic lines. In Scottish novelist Lewis Grassic Gibbon???s Sunset Song (1932) and T.S. Eliot???s The Waste Land (1922), communal disruptions produce self-alienated subjects who struggle to stabilize a sense of self among contradictory cultural and political demands. Gibbon???s novel is an imaginative recreation of how wartime legislation compelled isolated rural communities to form permanent new relationships to the state through the violent appropriation of natural resources and rural labor. The Waste… Advisors/Committee Members: Goodlad, Lauren (advisor), Goodlad, Lauren (Committee Chair), Hart, Matthew (Committee Chair), Hansen, James A. (committee member), Esty, Jed (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Power; Character; Interwar; T.S. Eliot; Lewis Grassic Gibbon; Rebecca West; Virginia Woolf; Vera Brittain; David Jones; Thomas Stearns Eliot

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Riede, A. N. (2012). Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29425

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Riede, Austin N. “Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29425.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Riede, Austin N. “Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939.” 2012. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Riede AN. Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29425.

Council of Science Editors:

Riede AN. Pulling oneself together: power and character in British literature, 1914-1939. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29425


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

3. Girard, Melissa. Lines of Feeling: Modernist Women's Poetry and the Limits of Sentimentality.

Degree: PhD, 0311, 2010, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Modernist sentimental poetry is frequently cast as an unfortunate literary and cultural mistake. In an era defined by its novel feats of poetic ambition, modernist sentimental poetry seems inexplicably to regress to the familiar forms and feelings of the nineteenth century. Alongside the modernist proliferation of “new” poetic forms, modernist sentimental poetry has thus been seen as decidedly “old”: an atavistic remnant of an earlier time and place, out of sync with high modernism’s progressive aesthetic vision. This is a foundational rift, which continues to divide the field of poetic modernism. Poets like T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, and H.D. are routinely credited with formal theories of poetic innovation. In stark contrast, the so-called “sentimental” poets who comprise this study, figures such as Edna St. Vincent Millay, Sara Teasdale, Genevieve Taggard, and Louise Bogan, have been categorized as conventional lyric poets. Critics have believed, wrongly, that their poetry is coextensive with the aesthetic and political aims of nineteenth-century sentimentality. Through a series of detailed textual and historical readings, “Lines of Feeling” demonstrates that this diverse group of modernist women poets reinvented the traditional form of the sentimental lyric in response to modernity. In so doing, they competed directly with the avant-garde to redefine the proper form and function of modernism. Advisors/Committee Members: Nelson, Cary (advisor), Nelson, Cary (Committee Chair), Esty, Jed (committee member), Foote, Stephanie (committee member), Somerville, Siobhan B. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Poetry; poetics; modernism; sentimentality; sentimentalism; affect

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Girard, M. (2010). Lines of Feeling: Modernist Women's Poetry and the Limits of Sentimentality. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/14745

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Girard, Melissa. “Lines of Feeling: Modernist Women's Poetry and the Limits of Sentimentality.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/14745.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Girard, Melissa. “Lines of Feeling: Modernist Women's Poetry and the Limits of Sentimentality.” 2010. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Girard M. Lines of Feeling: Modernist Women's Poetry and the Limits of Sentimentality. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/14745.

Council of Science Editors:

Girard M. Lines of Feeling: Modernist Women's Poetry and the Limits of Sentimentality. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/14745

.