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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Dubin, David"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Jackson, Larry S. Website Structure.

Degree: PhD, Library and Information Science, 2009, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation reports the results of an exploratory data analysis investigation of the relationship between the structures used for information organization and access and the associated storage structures within state government websites. Extending an earlier claim that hierarchical directory structures are both the preeminent information organization and file storage mechanism, three different classes of overall website structure were found to be identifiable by linear classifiers, when trained on features of the website hypertext graphs. Two more structural types, not analyzed with the classifiers, were suggested through an examination of misclassified websites. Further, the notion of website structure was found to be best modeled recursively, allowing variation on a sub-graph level, instead of deeming a structural class to apply to the entirety of a website. Linear discriminant analysis was used to construct a series of experimental classifiers, using subsets of ten features identified by either earlier classifiers or principal components analysis. Two groups of features, seemingly reflecting website size and graph density, were found to convey somewhat redundant information to the classifiers, in this application. A number of other practices in website implementation were uncovered that engender classifier errors, arguing for either the deliberate inclusion of websites having these properties in the training dataset, or the expansion of the feature set. Hierarchical cluster analysis and blockmodeling of whole-website graphs were also briefly investigated, and found to occasionally contribute file relatedness information of fundamentally distinct types, and information sometimes at variance with directory structure usage for file storage. Multiple literatures suggest a number of social factors that may influence the way websites and webpages are constructed within an organization, particularly the differing types of administrative control in bureaucracies, and the nature of help-seeking in technology work. While traces reminiscent of these suggestions were encountered, investigation of social causal factors behind website structural choices in the organizational types and workplace styles of the sponsoring agency remains a task for other researchers. Advisors/Committee Members: Dubin, David (advisor), Renear, Allen H. (Committee Chair), Dubin, David (committee member), Haythornthwaite, Caroline A. (committee member), Moen, William E. (committee member), La Barre, Kathryn A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: website structure; hypertext graph; linear discriminant analysis; linear classifier; website archiving; state government websites; Illinois State Library

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APA (6th Edition):

Jackson, L. S. (2009). Website Structure. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/11969

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jackson, Larry S. “Website Structure.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/11969.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jackson, Larry S. “Website Structure.” 2009. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Jackson LS. Website Structure. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/11969.

Council of Science Editors:

Jackson LS. Website Structure. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/11969

2. Wickett, Karen M. Collection/item metadata relationships.

Degree: PhD, 0370, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

In information organization systems, metadata is often attached to both collections and items. Collection metadata and item metadata are related: one can infer facts about items from descriptions of collections, and facts about collections from descriptions of items. This sort of reasoning, which is important to finding, understanding, and using information, is guided by specific, if usually only implicit, inference rules. This dissertation explores the general nature of these rules and develops a logic-based framework of categories for collection/item metadata rules. The resulting framework has 28 rule categories related by two logical relationships. This framework has practical applications in metadata vocabulary development, metadata-enabled search and retrieval, and metadata quality and completeness. A number of foundational questions are also discussed, including the ontological nature of collections, the logic of the collection membership relationship, the semantic and logical nature of collection/item inference rules, and difficulties in the translation of colloquial metadata records into a logic-based knowledge representation language. Advisors/Committee Members: Renear, Allen H. (advisor), Renear, Allen H. (Committee Chair), Palmer, Carole L. (committee member), Dubin, David (committee member), Furner, Jonathan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Metadata; Information organization; Collections; Digital libraries

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wickett, K. M. (2012). Collection/item metadata relationships. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/42198

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wickett, Karen M. “Collection/item metadata relationships.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/42198.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wickett, Karen M. “Collection/item metadata relationships.” 2012. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Wickett KM. Collection/item metadata relationships. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/42198.

Council of Science Editors:

Wickett KM. Collection/item metadata relationships. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/42198

3. Kehoe, Adam K. Predicting controlled vocabulary based on text and citations: Case studies in medical subject headings in MEDLINE and patents.

Degree: PhD, Library & Information Science, 2019, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation makes three contributions in the area of controlled vocabulary prediction of Medical Subject Headings. The first contribution is a new partial matching measure based on distributional semantics. The second contribution is a probabilistic model based on text similarity and citations. The third contribution is a case study of cross-domain vocabulary prediction in US Patents. Medical subject headings (MeSH) are an important life sciences controlled vocabulary. They are an ideal ground to study controlled vocabulary prediction due to their complexity, hierarchical nature, and practical significance. The dissertation begins with an updated analysis of human indexing consistency in MEDLINE. This study demonstrates the need for partial matching measures to account for indexing variability. Here, I develop four measures combining the MeSH hierarchy and contextual similarity. These measures provide several new tools for evaluating and diagnosing controlled vocabulary models. Next, a generalized predictive model is introduced. This model uses citations and abstract similarity as inputs to a hybrid KNN classifier. Citations and abstracts are found to be complimentary in that they reliably produce unique and relevant candidate terms. Finally, the predictive model is applied to a corpus of approximately 65,000 biomedical US patents. This case study explores differences in the vocabulary of MEDLINE and patents, as well as the prospect for MeSH prediction to open new scholarly opportunities in economics and health policy research. Advisors/Committee Members: Torvik, Vetle I (advisor), Torvik, Vetle I (Committee Chair), Smalheiser, Neil R (committee member), Dubin, David S (committee member), Ludäscher, Bertram (committee member), Downie, John S (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Controlled vocabulary; Medical Subject Headings; Controlled Vocabulary Prediction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kehoe, A. K. (2019). Predicting controlled vocabulary based on text and citations: Case studies in medical subject headings in MEDLINE and patents. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105645

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kehoe, Adam K. “Predicting controlled vocabulary based on text and citations: Case studies in medical subject headings in MEDLINE and patents.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105645.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kehoe, Adam K. “Predicting controlled vocabulary based on text and citations: Case studies in medical subject headings in MEDLINE and patents.” 2019. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kehoe AK. Predicting controlled vocabulary based on text and citations: Case studies in medical subject headings in MEDLINE and patents. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105645.

Council of Science Editors:

Kehoe AK. Predicting controlled vocabulary based on text and citations: Case studies in medical subject headings in MEDLINE and patents. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/105645

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