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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Brown, David E."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Varvel, Virgil E., Jr. Social Engineering Effects on Instructors and Students in an Elearning Environment.

Degree: PhD, 0215, 2010, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

The University of Illinois through the Illinois Online Network has been offering an 8-week fully online course titled, Online Learning: An Overview, as part of the award winning Making the Virtual Classroom a Reality (MVCR) program for nine years. This course was specifically designed as an interactive student-led discussion-centered elearning experience as is typical for the distance education field in the United States. However, analysis of the history of distance education as well as current global course offerings shows that less social means of distance education have been and still are viable educational alternatives to the traditional classroom. Furthermore, evaluations completed for this course as well as final program evaluations in MVCR show that a significant portion of students would prefer an independent-study model. This study questions the dominant U.S. distance education paradigm by analyzing the same course taught at the same time by the same instructor under two activity-different but content-equivalent instructional designs. Variables analyzed through experiential case study, content analysis, an instructor journal, and surveys include student satisfaction and self-perceived learning, instructor satisfaction, instructor time requirements, and depth or level of student demonstrated knowledge. Advisors/Committee Members: Tettegah, Sharon Y. (advisor), Tettegah, Sharon Y. (Committee Chair), Brown, David E. (committee member), Haythornthwaite, Caroline A. (committee member), Johnson, Scott D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: elearning; online learning; distance education; independent study

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Varvel, Virgil E., J. (2010). Social Engineering Effects on Instructors and Students in an Elearning Environment. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16800

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Varvel, Virgil E., Jr. “Social Engineering Effects on Instructors and Students in an Elearning Environment.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16800.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Varvel, Virgil E., Jr. “Social Engineering Effects on Instructors and Students in an Elearning Environment.” 2010. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Varvel, Virgil E. J. Social Engineering Effects on Instructors and Students in an Elearning Environment. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2010. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16800.

Council of Science Editors:

Varvel, Virgil E. J. Social Engineering Effects on Instructors and Students in an Elearning Environment. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16800

2. Cheng, Meng-Fei. The role of metaconceptual evaluation in fifth grade students' construction of explanatory models of magnetic phenomena.

Degree: PhD, 0095, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

The purpose of this study was to investigate in detail the processes involved when the promotion of metaconceptual evaluation facilitates fifth grade students’ construction, evaluation, and revision of their explanations for magnetic phenomena. Although much recent research emphasized the importance of student modeling and model construction, the topic of magnetism is typically taught as either simply observing magnetic phenomena or as introducing abstract knowledge, without asking students to construct their own models to account for magnetic phenomena. Also, as suggested by educational research, metacognition is important in such model construction. However, little research explores the detailed processes of how metacognition promotes model construction. In this study, a video-taped, multi-session teaching experiment was conducted with a small number of fifth grade students in order to study in detail the interactions between students’ metacognition and their development of explanatory models to account for magnetic phenomena. In this teaching experiment, two small groups received full scaffolding, and two small groups received partial scaffolding. Students in both the fully and partially scaffolded groups were asked to make their own predictions and explanations before observing magnetic phenomena, as well as to make individual explanations and modifications after their observations. Then, they were asked to elaborate on their individual ideas and to discuss them with others in order to select or develop the best group consensus model. In later activities, they were required to compare their current group model with their previous group models. In addition, fully scaffolded groups were explicitly asked to reflect on the metaconceptual modeling criteria of visualization and explanatory power. Multiple sources of data were collected, including transcripts of pre- and post-instructional interviews and activities, as well as the journals and papers students used to record and discuss their ideas. In order to explore how students’ metacognitive processes regulate their cognitive processes, these data were analyzed according to three main aspects: sophistication and coherence of explanations, conceptual resources used, and metaconceptual evaluation. Through reflection on their explanations using these metaconceptual modeling criteria, most students in the fully scaffolded groups gradually developed, evaluated, and revised their explanations to coherent and sophisticated microscopic explanatory models, similar to a simplified version of the scientific domain model of magnetism. They were able to activate, apply, and reorganize appropriate conceptual resources from the observational level to the microscopic level. By contrast, students in the partially scaffolded groups, who relied only on self-generated model-evaluation criteria, lumped together different ideas from different activities, without revising their original ideas toward more coherent and sophisticated explanatory models, so their… Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, David E. (advisor), Brown, David E. (Committee Chair), Hug, Barbara (committee member), Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad (committee member), Mestre, Jose P. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: elementary school; modeling; conceptual resources; explanatory model; self-developed explanation; magnetism; metacognition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cheng, M. (2012). The role of metaconceptual evaluation in fifth grade students' construction of explanatory models of magnetic phenomena. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/30954

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cheng, Meng-Fei. “The role of metaconceptual evaluation in fifth grade students' construction of explanatory models of magnetic phenomena.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/30954.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cheng, Meng-Fei. “The role of metaconceptual evaluation in fifth grade students' construction of explanatory models of magnetic phenomena.” 2012. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Cheng M. The role of metaconceptual evaluation in fifth grade students' construction of explanatory models of magnetic phenomena. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/30954.

Council of Science Editors:

Cheng M. The role of metaconceptual evaluation in fifth grade students' construction of explanatory models of magnetic phenomena. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/30954

3. Cunnings, Christopher Paul. Assessing the development & implementation of a student-centered, "flipped" secondary physics curriculum in which IO-Lab digital sensors are issued to students on a 1-to-1 basis.

Degree: EdD, Curriculum and Instruction, 2016, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This teacher-driven, action research dissertation study chronicles the development and implementation of a transformative, two-pronged, student-centered secondary physics education curriculum. From an instructional perspective, the curriculum was situated in the "flipped classroom" teaching approach, which minimizes in-class lecturing and instead predicates classroom learning on collaborative, hands-on, and activity-based lessons. Additionally, all students were issued IO-Lab digital sensors—learning tools developed by professors at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign capable of collecting a vast array of real-time physical data— on a 1-to-1, 24/7 basis for both in-class and at-home use. In-class, students participated in predominantly activity-based learning, with a sizeable portion of in-class activities incorporating IO-Labs for experimental data collection. Outside of class, students designed real-world research projects using their IO-Labs to study the physics underlying their everyday experiences, and all projects were video recorded, uploaded to YouTube, and then watched in-class to simulate a "mock science conference" in which students provided constructive feedback to each other on their experimental methods and results. The synergistic blending of a) flipped physics instruction, and b) perpetual access to state-of-the-art laboratory equipment, the two prongs forming the basis of this research study, inspired the curriculum title "Flipped IO-Lab," or "F-IO" curriculum. This dissertation study will provide a comprehensive assessment of the benefits and challenges that emerged while designing and implementing the F-IO curriculum from a practitioner’s perspective. The assessment of the F-IO curriculum came about through a mixed-methods research methodology during kinematics and dynamics instruction. Specifically, this study includes "Force Concept Inventory" (FCI) pretest/posttest analysis to gauge changes in students' conceptual understanding of physics, as well as "Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey" (CLASS) pre/post data to monitor students' shifts in scientific attitudes throughout the study. The aforementioned pre/post data will be triangulated with field notes and web-based "course opinion survey questions" to provide a comprehensive view of the F-IO curriculum. Significant analysis of the development of the course, as well as the relevant benefits, challenges, and considerations for "flipping" physics instruction, is also contained in this dissertation. The results of the research study include an FCI normalized gain of 0.74 (a "high gain" course), which indicates significant improvement in students’ conceptual understanding of Newtonian Mechanics. Additionally, CLASS results indicate significant shifts in student attitudes from generally novice initial scientific perspectives to predominantly expert scientific perspectives by the conclusion of the research study. Of particular interest was students' acknowledgement and appreciation of the real-world implications of… Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, David E (advisor), Brown, David E (Committee Chair), Selen, Mats A (committee member), Osborne, Margery D (committee member), Lindgren, Robb W (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); Flipped

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cunnings, C. P. (2016). Assessing the development & implementation of a student-centered, "flipped" secondary physics curriculum in which IO-Lab digital sensors are issued to students on a 1-to-1 basis. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90498

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cunnings, Christopher Paul. “Assessing the development & implementation of a student-centered, "flipped" secondary physics curriculum in which IO-Lab digital sensors are issued to students on a 1-to-1 basis.” 2016. Thesis, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90498.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cunnings, Christopher Paul. “Assessing the development & implementation of a student-centered, "flipped" secondary physics curriculum in which IO-Lab digital sensors are issued to students on a 1-to-1 basis.” 2016. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Cunnings CP. Assessing the development & implementation of a student-centered, "flipped" secondary physics curriculum in which IO-Lab digital sensors are issued to students on a 1-to-1 basis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90498.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cunnings CP. Assessing the development & implementation of a student-centered, "flipped" secondary physics curriculum in which IO-Lab digital sensors are issued to students on a 1-to-1 basis. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90498

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.