Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign" +contributor:("Bishop, Mardia"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Gailey, Benjamin Joseph. The performance and reception of flash mobs: authenticity, YouTube, and the fantastic.

Degree: PhD, Theatre, 2015, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation analyzes the performance methodology and reception of various flash mobs performed from 2003 to 2015. This twelve year history is separated into three periods. The first period consists of Bill Wasik’s initial flash mob performances, a series of eight events known as the Mob Project. These performances establish the three commonalities I use to define and identify flash mob performance- the anonymity between performer and spectator, the overloading of space, and the performance of incongruous action. The second period begins with the popularity of the T-Mobile flash mob commercial “Dance,” which introduced the use of a Protagonist and the “performer/spectator.” The third period is characterized by the use of flash mobs as advertisements by sponsoring organizations in order to achieve authentic alignment between themselves and their audience. All three periods are unified by a common potential reception on the part of the spectator- a reception that corresponds to Tzvetan Todorov’s theory of the Fantastic. Advisors/Committee Members: Davis, Peter (advisor), Davis, Peter A. (Committee Chair), Robinson, Valleri (committee member), Mitchell, Tom (committee member), Bishop, Mardia (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Flash mobs; YouTube; Fantastic; Authenticity; Theatre; Performance Studies

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gailey, B. J. (2015). The performance and reception of flash mobs: authenticity, YouTube, and the fantastic. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/88276

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gailey, Benjamin Joseph. “The performance and reception of flash mobs: authenticity, YouTube, and the fantastic.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/88276.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gailey, Benjamin Joseph. “The performance and reception of flash mobs: authenticity, YouTube, and the fantastic.” 2015. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Gailey BJ. The performance and reception of flash mobs: authenticity, YouTube, and the fantastic. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/88276.

Council of Science Editors:

Gailey BJ. The performance and reception of flash mobs: authenticity, YouTube, and the fantastic. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/88276


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

2. Thiel, Sara Boland Taylor. Great bellies and boy actors: pregnancy plays on the Stuart stage, 1603-1642.

Degree: PhD, Theatre, 2017, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Before 1603, pregnant characters were seldom present on English stages; because of mounting anxiety over Elizabeth’s failure to produce an heir, representations of pregnant bodies were, perhaps wisely, rare. In contrast, after James’s succession, dramatists displayed a growing interest in staging visibly pregnant characters that drive dramatic action, despite prevalent notions of the motherless Stuart stage. For example, Felicity Dunworth has suggested that the staged mother all but disappears upon James’s arrival to the throne. Despite scholarly biases toward maternal erasure on English stages after Elizabeth’s death, I argue the gestating body was indeed a site of dramatic interest, evinced by the wide variety of pregnancy plays written by the period’s most prolific writers including Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton, and Heywood, to name a few. In “Great Bellies and Boy Actors,” I analyze all twenty-two extant—what I term—“pregnancy plays,” first performed between 1603 and 1642. The defining characteristic of this dramatic subgenre is a pregnancy or pregnant character that drives the action of a plot in some significant way. Over the span of thirty-nine years, pregnancy became conspicuous in its representation on Stuart stages and this sudden increase in gestation’s visibility is deserving of significant critical consideration, though it has received scant attention from other scholars of early modern theatrical materials, prosthetics, or performed maternity. My work sheds light on this critical blind spot in early modern theatre history and drama that has emerged in the shadow cast by Queen Elizabeth and King James I. Each chapter takes as its central focus a text or group of texts that represent a particular dramaturgical strain within the subgenre such as patricentric, prosthetic, or peripheral pregnancy plays. Chapter one, A Pregnant Performance: Wielding the Royal Reproductive Body in The Masque of Blackness, takes Queen Anna of Denmark’s painted pregnant performance in Ben Jonson’s The Masque of Blackness (1605) as its primary object of study. I examine how Anna made her pregnant body highly visible in Blackness to create space for her political influence in the newly minted English Stuart court. Chapter two, Patricentric Pregnancy Plays: The Problem of Opaque Bodies in Histories, Romances, and Tragedies, illuminates a major dramaturgical trend in Stuart pregnancy plays—those wrestling with patriarchal anxiety produced by the unknown child concealed within the mother’s opaque belly. In these patricentric pregnancy plays, the gestating characters’ high-stakes pregnancies have the ability to secure or destroy their respective lineage. As such, I suggest these pregnancy plays tacitly hearken back to the anxiety-inducing matriarchal authority wielded by Queen Anna at the beginning of the Stuart reign. Chapter three, Prosthetic Pregnancy Plays: Materializing the Belly and Demystifying Gestation in Comedies, centers on how comedies foreground the prosthetic and material construction of the “great belly”… Advisors/Committee Members: Stevens, Andrea (advisor), Stevens, Andrea (Committee Chair), Robinson, Valleri J (Committee Chair), Gray, Catharine (committee member), Bishop, Mardia J (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Pregnancy; Pregnancy play; Pregnancy plays; Shakespeare; Theater; Theater history; Original practices; Early modern theater; Early modern London; Early modern drama Stuart; Stuart London; Middleton; Jonson; Webster; Heywood; Queen Anna; Anna of Denmark; Masque of Blackness; Belly; Great belly; Great bellies; Boy actor; Cushion; Pregnancy prosthetic

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thiel, S. B. T. (2017). Great bellies and boy actors: pregnancy plays on the Stuart stage, 1603-1642. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97536

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thiel, Sara Boland Taylor. “Great bellies and boy actors: pregnancy plays on the Stuart stage, 1603-1642.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97536.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thiel, Sara Boland Taylor. “Great bellies and boy actors: pregnancy plays on the Stuart stage, 1603-1642.” 2017. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Thiel SBT. Great bellies and boy actors: pregnancy plays on the Stuart stage, 1603-1642. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97536.

Council of Science Editors:

Thiel SBT. Great bellies and boy actors: pregnancy plays on the Stuart stage, 1603-1642. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97536


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

3. Bunch, Caroline M. Bumpkin rising: the development of American identity through the country bumpkin character in American manners plays.

Degree: PhD, Theatre, 2017, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

In this dissertation, the country bumpkin character type is analyzed as a reflection of American identity. In the English tradition, the country bumpkin is often the object of ridicule because of his ignorance and buffoonish mistakes, but in America this type morphs into a freedom loving character imbued with common sense, a strong will, and a distrust of class structures. In this study, the country bumpkin type is used to look at the formation of a national identity and how the constructed nature of that identity privileges some aspects of society while ignoring or degrading others. The focus of this work is the bumpkin’s development in American theatre from its arrival in colonial America until the verge of World War Two. Each chapter examines the historical and cultural context of the time, applies that to a significant manners play of the period, and discusses American identity through the lens of the country bumpkin. The periods within the dissertation are framed by war, notably the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Civil War, and World War One. The earlier chapters focus on England’s strong influence on the emerging nation and America’s struggle to form an independent identity. The middle section concentrates on America’s internal battles and the final chapter deals with the United States on its rise to world power. The embracing of this character is still popular today in all aspects of American culture and in addition to entertainment can be seen in our political candidates. Advisors/Committee Members: Davis, Peter A (advisor), Davis, Peter A (Committee Chair), Robinson, Valleri (committee member), Syer, Katherine (committee member), Bishop, Mardia (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Country bumpkin; American identity; American theatre; National identity; American plays; Manners

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bunch, C. M. (2017). Bumpkin rising: the development of American identity through the country bumpkin character in American manners plays. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97560

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bunch, Caroline M. “Bumpkin rising: the development of American identity through the country bumpkin character in American manners plays.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97560.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bunch, Caroline M. “Bumpkin rising: the development of American identity through the country bumpkin character in American manners plays.” 2017. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Bunch CM. Bumpkin rising: the development of American identity through the country bumpkin character in American manners plays. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97560.

Council of Science Editors:

Bunch CM. Bumpkin rising: the development of American identity through the country bumpkin character in American manners plays. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97560

.