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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Welch, Eric W"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Parker, Marla A. Social Network Determinants of Self-Perceived Influence among Minority and Non-Minority STEM Faculty.

Degree: 2014, University of Illinois – Chicago

This dissertation explores the significance of social networks of academic science, technology, engineering and mathematic (STEM) faculty in determining their amount of self-perceived influence in organizational decision making. Particular focus is placed on understanding how self-perceived influence varies between underrepresented minority (URM) and non-URM STEM faculty. This dissertation is motivated by several factors. First, there is the prevalent marginalization experienced by URM STEM faculty, which lessens the likelihood of them having a role in key organizational decision making. Second. while there is evidence suggesting that social relationships help URM STEM faculty succeed in academic organizations, less is known about the composition of their networks (i.e. structure, relationships, and etc.) and the impact that network composition has on their experiences in the organization. Furthermore, while URM STEM faculty have frequently recounted their experiences in academia in the context of how they are perceived by others in their environment, less is known about how URM STEM faculty perceive their own positions. Lastly, while research has addressed the relationship between networks and how they shape the perceived influence of people (as conceived by others) in decision making, less research has addressed how networks impact individual’s self-perceived influence in organizational decision making—especially in the academic STEM environment. Thus, the proposed dissertation seeks to fill gaps in literature by linking the structure of social networks of URM STEM faculty to how they impact URM’s self-perceived influence in organizational decision making. Primary research questions are: 1) Does network structure significantly explain the level of self-perceived influence held by academic science faculty in organizational decision making?; 2) Are there differences in the level of self-perceived influence held by URM academic science faculty versus non-URM academic science faculty; and 3) do URM and non-URM social networks explain self-perceived influence in the same way?. These questions are addressed by using structural equation modeling to understand the direct and indirect effects of race and network variables on self-perceived influence. Data from a national online survey of academic scientists is used for the analysis. Advisors/Committee Members: Welch, Eric W (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Social networks; minority scientists; self-perceived influence; organizational decision making

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Parker, M. A. (2014). Social Network Determinants of Self-Perceived Influence among Minority and Non-Minority STEM Faculty. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/18873

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parker, Marla A. “Social Network Determinants of Self-Perceived Influence among Minority and Non-Minority STEM Faculty.” 2014. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed November 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/18873.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parker, Marla A. “Social Network Determinants of Self-Perceived Influence among Minority and Non-Minority STEM Faculty.” 2014. Web. 21 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Parker MA. Social Network Determinants of Self-Perceived Influence among Minority and Non-Minority STEM Faculty. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/18873.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Parker MA. Social Network Determinants of Self-Perceived Influence among Minority and Non-Minority STEM Faculty. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/18873

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Shin, Eunjung. Exclusive Sharing of Genetic Materials in U.S. Agricultural Research: Antecedents and Consequences.

Degree: 2014, University of Illinois – Chicago

As recognition of the scientific and industrial values of genetic materials has increased, so have restrictions on access to those materials for research. Nonetheless, our understanding of access to genetic materials in science is still limited. As a way of assessing access to genetic materials in agricultural research, this study sought to uncover the critical moments when genetic materials begin to be withheld by selective entities. Exclusive sharing was defined as the condition in which genetic materials were shared only by selective entities but not transferred to a third-party. The decision on whether to have a third-party sharing restriction was modeled with socio-ecological antecedents and used to predict the likelihood of producing research outcomes (i.e., publications and intellectual property outcomes). Results show that exclusive sharing is associated with broader socio-ecological contexts which cannot be reduced to pure science production systems. Scientists’ exclusive sharing was found to be influenced by national borders and the ecological conditions of the genetic materials shared. Furthermore, exclusive sharing comes down to individual and interpersonal decision, so that bilateral interactions among material providers and receivers were found to play an important role in setting a third-party sharing restriction. Predicted sharing restrictions, in turn, influenced intellectual property outcomes and publications to a different degree. Results suggest that setting a third-party sharing restriction can be beneficial for intellectual property outcomes but does not provide much benefit for publishing articles. This can indicate that there exist two divergent production systems connecting material-sharing with research outcomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Welch, Eric W (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Genetic resources; Material sharing; Data sharing; Research outcomes; Intellectual property; Publications

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shin, E. (2014). Exclusive Sharing of Genetic Materials in U.S. Agricultural Research: Antecedents and Consequences. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/11274

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shin, Eunjung. “Exclusive Sharing of Genetic Materials in U.S. Agricultural Research: Antecedents and Consequences.” 2014. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed November 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/11274.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shin, Eunjung. “Exclusive Sharing of Genetic Materials in U.S. Agricultural Research: Antecedents and Consequences.” 2014. Web. 21 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Shin E. Exclusive Sharing of Genetic Materials in U.S. Agricultural Research: Antecedents and Consequences. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/11274.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Shin E. Exclusive Sharing of Genetic Materials in U.S. Agricultural Research: Antecedents and Consequences. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/11274

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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