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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Wang, Vincent M."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Trella, Katie. Hypoxia in Tendinopathies: From Epigenomics to Chondroid Metaplasia.

Degree: 2016, University of Illinois – Chicago

Tendon overuse, due to work- and sports-related activities, is the initiating factor for tendinopathy in the majority of patients, accounting for 30-50% of all sports medicine related injuries. The severity of subsequent impaired mechanical function, pain, and inflammation is influenced by age, activity level, genetic predisposition, co-morbities, and adverse drug effects. Due to the complexity of this musculoskeletal disease, successful pharmacological and physical therapies are still lacking. While the current model of pathogenesis includes published data on the nature of the initiating extrinsic factors (e.g. acute micro-injury and chronic overuse) and provides a molecular link between collagen fibril disorganization and loss of biomechanical function, it fails to provide any details on the nature of the cellular responses that produce a chronic non-functional tissue. The over-arching goal of this project was to advance the understanding of those cellular mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of tendinopathy using epigenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic methods. Firstly, a murine model of Achilles tendinopathy was utilized to determine novel pathways associated with tendinopathy through epigenetic mechanisms (Aim 1). Methylome analyses in WT mice allowed for the discovery of differential methylation in the promoter regions of 5 genes (Leprel2, Foxf1, Mmp25, Igfbp6, and Peg12) during the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Notably their known functional roles are all relevant collagen dis-organization and development of chondroid metaplasia, typically associated with tendinopathy. Histological evaluation of end stage diseased human tendons has suggested a potential involvement of hypoxia-mediated damage patterns to tendon cells and matrix, however, no molecular evidence has been reported to date. The murine Achilles tendinopathy model was used to examine the expression of a range of genes known to be affected by cellular responses to hypoxia (Aim 2). Overall expression levels of hypoxia signaling genes, specifically those involved in angiogenesis/coagulation and metabolism/transport were significantly altered with injury. Moreover, expression changes coincided with appearance of chondroid deposits in the pericellular and interfibrillar spaces of the tendon. Lastly, given the changes in expression of genes involved in metabolism and those regulated by metabolism, a murine Achilles tendon explant system was developed to study the role of oxygen tension where intrinsic tendon cells could be studied within their native ECM (Aim 3). Injured explanted tendons demonstrated an inability to respond to changes in oxygen tension and exhibited altered metabolism (increased glucose uptake and NADH/NADPH production). All aims were also conducted with the Adamts5-/- mouse which exhibited a severe tendinopathic phenotype. In summary, using both in-vivo and ex-vivo murine systems, we have shown altered metabolic measures following tendon injury, which correlated with chondroid matrix deposition, a classic… Advisors/Committee Members: Eddington, David (advisor), Plaas, Anna (committee member), Wang, Vincent M. (committee member), Wysocki, Robert (committee member), Dai, Yang (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Tendinopathy; Epigenomics; Hypoxia; Ex-Vivo Tendon; Tendon Metabolism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Trella, K. (2016). Hypoxia in Tendinopathies: From Epigenomics to Chondroid Metaplasia. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21221

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Trella, Katie. “Hypoxia in Tendinopathies: From Epigenomics to Chondroid Metaplasia.” 2016. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21221.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Trella, Katie. “Hypoxia in Tendinopathies: From Epigenomics to Chondroid Metaplasia.” 2016. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Trella K. Hypoxia in Tendinopathies: From Epigenomics to Chondroid Metaplasia. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21221.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Trella K. Hypoxia in Tendinopathies: From Epigenomics to Chondroid Metaplasia. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21221

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Bell, Rebecca. The Effects of Mechanical Loading and ADAMTS5 Activity in a Tendinopathy Model.

Degree: 2012, University of Illinois – Chicago

Tendinopathy is a chronic tendon disorder that accounts for ~50% of all sports-related “over-use” injuries and ~12% of work-related injuries (Bureau of Labor Statistics). Consistent findings in tendinopathic tissue are collagen fiber disorganization/rupture and mucoid degeneration (aggrecan rich deposits, or ARDs). Despite their prevalence, presently it is unknown whether ARDs are pathogenic. Aggrecan presence occurs at low levels in the tensile regions of tendon and undergoes rapid aggrecanase-mediated turnover in normal tendons. The lack of ADAMTS5 (aggrecanase-2) has been shown to lead to ARDs in collagen rich tissues (skin, cartilage). The objective of this dissertation was to test the hypothesis that accumulation of aggrecan is detrimental to normal and injured tendon function. The first aim was to examine the effect of ADAMTS5 on the properties of flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and Achilles tendons in skeletally mature mice. FDL tendons of adamts5-/- (ts5-/-) mice showed a 33% larger cross-sectional area, increased collagen fibril area fraction, and decreased material properties relative to those of age matched wild type mice. In Achilles tendons, cross-sectional area, stress relaxation, and structural properties were similar in ts5-/- and wild type mice; however, the ts5-/- tendons exhibited a higher tensile modulus and a weakened enthesis. In ts5-/- mice, aggrecan accumulated in the pericellular matrix of tendon fibroblasts within the tendon body as well as the insertion site. These results demonstrate that TS5 deficiency disturbs normal tendon collagen organization and alters biomechanical properties. Hence, the role of adamts5 in tendon is to remove pericellular and interfibrillar aggrecan to maintain the molecular architecture responsible for normal tissue function. The second aim was to develop an in vivo tendinopathy model characterized by ARDs and weakened biomechanical properties. TGFβ was used to create this model in wild type cage active mice by injecting the growth factor into the Achilles tendon body. At two weeks the cross-sectional area was increased, while the tensile stiffness and maximum stress were reduced relative to the respective properties of naïve (uninjured) wild type mice. The stiffness and maximum stress remained compromised compared to the naïve at 4 weeks. Histologic analysis demonstrated increased cellularity and aggrecan staining throughout the midportion of tendon near the injection site both two weeks and four weeks. Gene expression of aggrecan and MMP3 increased by greater than 100 fold relative to naïve at two weeks and remained elevated (> 75 fold increase) at 4 weeks, whereas gene expression for the collagen binding integrins (α1 and α2) was reduced throughout the 4-week period. The third aim was to examine the role of mechanobiology in the development of tendinopathy using the murine model developed in Aim 2. Treadmill exercise following induction of the tendinopathy caused an increase of cross-sectional area and decrease of stiffness and maximum stress at 2 weeks but at… Advisors/Committee Members: Royston, Thomas J. (advisor), Wang, Vincent M. (committee member), Plaas, Anna (committee member), Eddington, David (committee member), Troy, Karen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: mechanics; tendon; ADAMTS; mechanobiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bell, R. (2012). The Effects of Mechanical Loading and ADAMTS5 Activity in a Tendinopathy Model. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9508

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bell, Rebecca. “The Effects of Mechanical Loading and ADAMTS5 Activity in a Tendinopathy Model.” 2012. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9508.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bell, Rebecca. “The Effects of Mechanical Loading and ADAMTS5 Activity in a Tendinopathy Model.” 2012. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Bell R. The Effects of Mechanical Loading and ADAMTS5 Activity in a Tendinopathy Model. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9508.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bell R. The Effects of Mechanical Loading and ADAMTS5 Activity in a Tendinopathy Model. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9508

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Gupta, Aman. Ultra-High Field MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Characterization of Rabbit Tendons and Ligaments.

Degree: 2012, University of Illinois – Chicago

Tendons and ligaments are dense, fibrous connective tissues that facilitate transmission of loads from muscle to bone (tendon) or from bone to bone (ligament). These tissues are subjected to wear and tear from day-to-day mechanical usage leading to sprains, tendinopathies, or ruptures, each of which is a major source of musculoskeletal disability. Clinically, the diagnosis of tendon and ligament injury is based on a clinical examination as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the relevant tissues. MRI is a reliable, non-invasive tool for detecting large and complete tears; however, conventional T1 and T2-weighted grayscale images exhibit poor contrast and a low signal-to-noise ratio which makes identification of low-grade injuries more challenging to delineate. Therefore, there exists a need for reliable, quantitative and more robust imaging approaches to assess tendon and ligament microstructure and integrity. One of these MR approaches is diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), an advanced MRI technique primarily used in neuroimaging applications. DTI assesses tissue microstructural organization by quantifying the 3D diffusion of water molecules within tissues. It relies on the basic diffusion principle that water molecules diffuse more readily along (i.e., parallel to), rather than across physical barriers (e.g., collagen fibers). Diffusion of water molecules can be quantified by the diffusion tensor in each voxel, whereby the magnitude and orientation of water diffusion can be computed throughout the tissue, thus revealing the fiber microstructure. The primary aims of the proposed studies are to demonstrate applicability and reliability of the DTI technique for tendons and ligaments, and determine the sensitivity of b-values to DTI derived parameters of tissue integrity. This is the first study to show feasibility and applicability of DTI on Tendons and Ligaments at ultra-high magnetic fields with high resolutions and measure DTI metrics from both tissue types. High Fractional Anisotropy values of 0.67 for semitendinosus tendons and 0.66 for medial collateral ligaments shows the highly anisotropic nature of these soft connective tissues.Axial diffusivity is about 3 times the radial diffusivity which shows diffusion directional anisotropy indicating diffusion preference along the fibers then across them. The present study showed fiber tractography of these tissues at ultra-high magnetic fields with a histological correlation confirming the highly-organized parallel collagen fiber microstructure. Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive to the diffusional anisotropy differences and can show microstructural differences between tendons and ligaments through DTI metrics at 11. 7 T field strength. The current work also found the most feasible range of b-values of 300-600 s/mm2 which will be best suited for these tissue types at the given magnetic field strength of 11.7T and get more reliable DTI measurements. DTI metrics can provide insight into 3D tissue integrity and … Advisors/Committee Members: Magin, Richard L. (advisor), Wang, Vincent M. (committee member), Stebbins, Glenn T. (committee member), Royston, Thomas J. (committee member), Akpa, Belinda S. (committee member), Zelazny, Anthony M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Diffusion Tensor Imaging; Tendon; Ligament; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; ultra-high field; Fractional Anisotropy; Mean Diffusivity; Tractography; b-value optimization

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gupta, A. (2012). Ultra-High Field MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Characterization of Rabbit Tendons and Ligaments. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9137

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gupta, Aman. “Ultra-High Field MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Characterization of Rabbit Tendons and Ligaments.” 2012. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9137.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gupta, Aman. “Ultra-High Field MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Characterization of Rabbit Tendons and Ligaments.” 2012. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Gupta A. Ultra-High Field MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Characterization of Rabbit Tendons and Ligaments. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9137.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gupta A. Ultra-High Field MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Characterization of Rabbit Tendons and Ligaments. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9137

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.