Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Vaingurt, Julia"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Zotova, Yelena. Envy as an Object of Artistic Representation in Russian Modernist Prose.

Degree: 2014, University of Illinois – Chicago

The present study explores envy as an object of artistic representation in the works of three Russian Modernist authors – Iurii Olesha (1899-1960), Konstantin Vaginov (1899-1934), and Aleksandr Grin (1880-1932) – through the prism of Mikhail Bakhtin’s aesthetic and philosophical theory of authorship developed in “The Author and the Hero in the Aesthetic Activity” (1924?). Based on Bakhtin’s idea that a word and a thought are ethical deeds, Envy as an Object of Artistic Representation argues for a possibility to extend the aesthetic notion of authorship to the realm of ethics, by drawing a parallel between conscience as an ethical phenomenon and taste as an aesthetic one. Writing at the time of the radical social, political and cultural change in the newly forming egalitarian society, the Russian Modernist authors repeatedly employ the notion of bad taste as a means to portray conscience corrupt by envy. The dual nature of authorship, reflected in Bakhtin’s ideas of “live-entering [vzhivanie]” and “outsidedness [vnenakhodimost’]” as of two complementary processes required of the author in the aesthetic act, corresponds to the marked ambiguity inherent in the phenomenon of envy, which paradoxically combines one’s existential desire to assume the identity of the Other with the diametrically opposite impulse to “narrate” the Other, to become, as it were, the Other’s author. The study reveals Bakhtin’s idea of the author’s responsibility, or “answerability [otvetstvennost’],” towards the hero as the key factor distinguishing successful authorship from envy. The current work treats the latter as a form of “incompetent,” or “inept [neumeloe]” authorship. Thus, rather than creating a binary opposition between envy and authorship, this study offers an innovative view on envy as on authorship in embryo and measures the success of authorship on a sliding scale. To the extent envy is strong, authorship is weak, and vice versa: strong authorship absorbs one’s envy as a raw material and converts it into art or an ethical deed. Although it is difficult to establish the threshold, beyond which authorship prevails and envy gives in, conscience and taste may serve as indicators: the former on the ethical, and the latter, on the aesthetic plane. Advisors/Committee Members: Vaingurt, Julia (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: abject; aesthetics; answerability; anxiety of influence; art; artist; author; Author and Hero; authorship; autobiography; Bakhtin; Bateson; biography; creativity; Crimson Sails; conscience; Covering Cherub; crowd; double-bind; denunciation; donos; egalitarian; egalitarianism; empathy; emulation; envy; Envy; ethics; Fandango; feminine; face; Florenskii; Florensky; Freud; Girard; Gumilev; generativity; gender; Germany; gratitude; Grin; hero; Hesiod; hierarchy of values; imitation; Jessie and Morgiana; Klein; life-creation; life-creationism; live-entering; Luknitskii; Luknitsky; mediated desire; Melanie Klein; distortion; mediator; mob; Modernism; Modernist; Mozart; Mozart and Salieri; NEP; NEPman; New Economic Policy; New Man; Nietzsche; noble; nobility; Oedipal; OGPU; Ofelia; Olesha; October Revolution; outsidedness; philistine; Pushkin; Raboty i Dni; Ressentiment; Russia; Russia and the West; Russian; Sachs; Salieri; Scarlet Sails; Scheler; secret police; Schoeck; Soviet; Soviet regime; Soviet Union; spy; spying; Symbolism; Symbolist; responsibility; reverse perspective; Revolution; taste; Taylor; Taylorism; Tower; Underground Man; Vaginov; value; value system; Works and Days; Works and Days of Svistonov; voyeurism; vnenakhodimost’; vzhivanie; zhiznetvorchestvo

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zotova, Y. (2014). Envy as an Object of Artistic Representation in Russian Modernist Prose. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/18914

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zotova, Yelena. “Envy as an Object of Artistic Representation in Russian Modernist Prose.” 2014. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed April 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/18914.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zotova, Yelena. “Envy as an Object of Artistic Representation in Russian Modernist Prose.” 2014. Web. 23 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Zotova Y. Envy as an Object of Artistic Representation in Russian Modernist Prose. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2014. [cited 2019 Apr 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/18914.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zotova Y. Envy as an Object of Artistic Representation in Russian Modernist Prose. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/18914

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

2. Slager, Michael A. Oriental Russia: Colonialism and the Politics of Identity.

Degree: 2015, University of Illinois – Chicago

This thesis shows how Russia’s culture can be construed as a hybrid space because it is both central and peripheral, not simply East or West. From a cultural point of view, the center and the periphery were and are a kind of slippery palimpsest throughout the nation's history since it was (and is) both colonizer and colonized. The Russian elite’s obsession with the West and efforts to westernize itself can be interpreted as postcolonial since it was intellectually and culturally colonized on the part of European intellectuals beginning in the early eighteenth century. Educated Russians exhibited many of the features of a postcolonial society such as mimicry that becomes mockery, psychological displacement, sustained preoccupations with cultural authenticity, the search for an alternate national identity, and the adopting of the colonizer's language as its primary modes of discourse. I show that Russia shares these critical postcolonial features with other, similar societies, especially as reflected in both literary and non-literary texts. The discourse I counter is one that claims that Russians were simply aping the West in and unthinking way that reflected some ephemeral fashion of the day. The general denigration and neglect of Russian traditions on the part of Russians was, I claim, a response to the West's orientalizing of the country, the primary mode of its cultural colonization. However, the Russian authors I examine also adopted what were considered positive Oriental features that they pressed into service for the construction of an ideal national identity. The educated members of its society subsequently sought to become members of a “civilized” Western fraternity of nations. This makes Russia unique because it was both center and periphery, colonizer and colonized. Advisors/Committee Members: Vaingurt, Julia (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Colonialism; Orientalism; Imperialism; National identity

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Slager, M. A. (2015). Oriental Russia: Colonialism and the Politics of Identity. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19680

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Slager, Michael A. “Oriental Russia: Colonialism and the Politics of Identity.” 2015. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed April 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19680.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Slager, Michael A. “Oriental Russia: Colonialism and the Politics of Identity.” 2015. Web. 23 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Slager MA. Oriental Russia: Colonialism and the Politics of Identity. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19680.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Slager MA. Oriental Russia: Colonialism and the Politics of Identity. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19680

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.