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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Simpson, Dick"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Reynolds, Marcie. John Gardner’s Interest Group Design: The Foundation and Evolution of a Lobbying Organization.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

In 1970, John W. Gardner founded Common Cause, the first national government reform lobby. Common Cause lobbyists—and the organization— soon earned a reputation for integrity and influence among Members of Congress and the American public. For almost thirty years, Common Cause operated according to action principles set forth by early leaders (or Gardner’s Rules). Yet, by the mid-1990s organizational survival was in question. Existential crises increased pressure on the organization to amend Gardner’s Rules. A tipping point was reached when top positions were filled by leaders relatively new to Common Cause. Their reorganization plans introduced significant changes to the group’s operations and culture. New leaders amended long-held action principles. For example, the Common Cause Education Fund (a 501c3 arm enabling tax-deductible contributions but limiting lobbying activities) was added as a means to gain foundation grants. State office campaigns received more attention and resources. Grassroots mobilization became a primary advocacy strategy instead of filling a supporting role for professionalized lobbying. In addition, financial considerations forced leaders to sacrifice descriptive representation processes. Leaders increasingly took on trustee-like roles, selecting and promoting issues that citizens chose to support. Yet, the ubiquity of internet activism suggests at some level leaders must listen to their supporters. Thus, a case study of Common Cause is a means to explore dual representation, or how an elite leadership represents the “what before the who.” Historical analysis of Common Cause from 1991 to 2017 contributes a longitudinal perspective of organizational maintenance and advocacy dynamics through evolving contexts. When combined with prior case studies by Andrew S. McFarland (1984) and Lawrence S. Rothenberg (1992), this project creates a sequence of analytical research about one interest group spanning over forty-five years, a unique contribution to the field. Moreover, it provides a lens for studying how key aspects of the U.S. political system—interest groups, collective action, lobbying, and representation—work as the environment changes. Advisors/Committee Members: Simpson, Dick (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Entrepreneur; representation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reynolds, M. (2017). John Gardner’s Interest Group Design: The Foundation and Evolution of a Lobbying Organization. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22200

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reynolds, Marcie. “John Gardner’s Interest Group Design: The Foundation and Evolution of a Lobbying Organization.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed July 20, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22200.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reynolds, Marcie. “John Gardner’s Interest Group Design: The Foundation and Evolution of a Lobbying Organization.” 2017. Web. 20 Jul 2018.

Vancouver:

Reynolds M. John Gardner’s Interest Group Design: The Foundation and Evolution of a Lobbying Organization. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2018 Jul 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22200.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Reynolds M. John Gardner’s Interest Group Design: The Foundation and Evolution of a Lobbying Organization. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22200

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

2. Healy, Shawn P. Essential School Supports for Civic Learning.

Degree: 2015, University of Illinois – Chicago

This dissertation tests the respective contributions of traditional and innovative civic learning practices to students’ civic knowledge and skills via statistical analysis of student performance on the past three iterations of the National Assessment of Educational Progress in Civics. Their ability to close the “civic achievement gap” across race and ethnicity, family income, parental educational attainment, and English language proficiency is also determined. Next, through analysis of 2013 Illinois Five Essentials survey data, school mission and vision statements, student handbooks, school-wide civic assessments, and structured interviews with 25 teachers and administrators at Illinois high schools recognized for their strong civic learning programs, common elements for sustained, systemic commitments to students’ civic development were deduced. Exposure to selected traditional and innovative civic learning practices collectively contributes to students’ civic knowledge and skills. The latter do not universally outperform the former. In fact, they appear most impactful when offered in tandem. Moreover, the vast majority of these practices fail to close the aforementioned “civic achievement gap.” They do, however, make positive contributions across demographic groups. Unfortunately, exposure to powerful practices at ideal dosages is inequitably distributed, where white, non-poor, English proficient students whose parents completed college are more likely to benefit. Finally, schools with sustained, systemic commitments to students’ civic development have strong civic mission statements and shared leadership in their pursuit. They boast challenging curriculum with traditional and innovative civic learning practices woven across grade levels and subject areas. They also leverage reciprocal relationships with parents and the surrounding commitment, where all parties view one another as vital resources. While the selected schools have room for improvement in the areas of civic-oriented staff development and a school climate that nurtures students’ civic development, these indicators are vital to sustaining and systematizing school-based civic learning. Advisors/Committee Members: Simpson, Dick W (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: civic learning; civic education; NAEP civics; five essentials; school improvement; student voice

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Healy, S. P. (2015). Essential School Supports for Civic Learning. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19362

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Healy, Shawn P. “Essential School Supports for Civic Learning.” 2015. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed July 20, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19362.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Healy, Shawn P. “Essential School Supports for Civic Learning.” 2015. Web. 20 Jul 2018.

Vancouver:

Healy SP. Essential School Supports for Civic Learning. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. [cited 2018 Jul 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19362.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Healy SP. Essential School Supports for Civic Learning. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19362

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

3. Mouritsen, Melissa M. Looking Inside the Black Box: Economic Development in Suburbia.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

Policy making in suburban governments has not been as robustly studied as that of larger cities. Explanations tend to rely on market and economic explanations, portraying suburban governments as pawns or even prisoners of the larger metropolitan economy. Sometimes suburbia is even described as a battleground for jobs, resources and residents. This leaves little to no room for politics in suburban governance; instead it is an all out quest for the maximization of tax revenues. Using Savitch and Kantor’s concept of driving and steering variables, I propose that suburban governments can and do have agency in the decisions they make. Suburbs create a vision of what they want for their community, and enact policy to realize that vision to the extent that they have the necessary resources to achieve that vision. Advisors/Committee Members: Simpson, Dick (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Suburbs; vision; policy; suburban governance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mouritsen, M. M. (2017). Looking Inside the Black Box: Economic Development in Suburbia. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21833

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mouritsen, Melissa M. “Looking Inside the Black Box: Economic Development in Suburbia.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed July 20, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21833.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mouritsen, Melissa M. “Looking Inside the Black Box: Economic Development in Suburbia.” 2017. Web. 20 Jul 2018.

Vancouver:

Mouritsen MM. Looking Inside the Black Box: Economic Development in Suburbia. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2018 Jul 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21833.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mouritsen MM. Looking Inside the Black Box: Economic Development in Suburbia. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21833

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.