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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Santymire, Rachel M"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Howell-Stephens, Jennifer A. Assessing Welfare of Armadillos Using Hormonal & Foraging Indicators, and Patch Use in Argentinean Birds.

Degree: 2012, University of Illinois – Chicago

This dissertation explores aspects of endocrinology and foraging ecology to study the hormone profiles and well-being of zoo-housed three-banded armadillos (Tolypeutes matacus). It also uses foraging ecology to study foraging behavior in a seed-eating bird community in Argentina. Though the subjects may seem different, understanding how animals perceive and react to their environments is a common theme. Chapter 1 describes my journey to and through the dissertation, as I tackled my lab work, and broke free from my fear of field work. It also reflects my beliefs and personal goals for my post-doctorate career. Chapter 2 describes the characterization of the gonadal hormone activity of the zoo-housed three-banded armadillo. Non-invasive fecal hormone analysis was used to evaluate the fecal progestagen metabolites in females’ samples and fecal androgen metabolites in males’ samples using enzyme immunoassays. The third chapter describes the characterization of the adrenocortical activity of the zoo-housed three-banded armadillo. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge was conducted (1 male, 1 female) to validate the physiological response of elevated adrenocortical activity expected from an increase in ACTH. Biological events (aggressive pairing, copulation, pregnancy, veterinary procedures) validated the biological elevation of adrenocortical activity in response to a stressor. A longitudinal study of the adrenocortical activity of male and female armadillos was also conducted. Chapter 4 examines the integration of evaluating the adrenocortical activity and foraging behavior in zoo-housed armadillos to determine how they perceive their environment to assess their well-being. Foraging patches were used to quantify foraging intensity (giving-up densities, GUDs) of armadillos within three patch treatments (varying substrate quantity, patch quality and bedding amount). Non-invasive fecal hormone analysis was used to evaluate the fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGM) in male and female samples using enzyme immunoassays. The fifth chapter addresses the foraging behavior of a seed-eating bird community in Argentina. The work supports the idea that birds are major seed consumers in South America and may out-compete rodents for seeds in these communities. Giving-up densities were measured to evaluate bird’s foraging preferences. Camera traps allowed for the identification of species that foraged from food patches, along with their spatial and temporal patterns. Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, Joel S. (advisor), Santymire, Rachel M. (committee member), Whelan, Chris (committee member), Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. (committee member), Park, Thomas J. (committee member), Rafacz, Michelle L. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: armadillo; fecal hormone analysis; progesterone; testosterone; cortisol; reproduction; adrenocortical activity; giving-up densities; bird; foraging behavior; patch use

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Howell-Stephens, J. A. (2012). Assessing Welfare of Armadillos Using Hormonal & Foraging Indicators, and Patch Use in Argentinean Birds. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9485

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Howell-Stephens, Jennifer A. “Assessing Welfare of Armadillos Using Hormonal & Foraging Indicators, and Patch Use in Argentinean Birds.” 2012. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9485.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Howell-Stephens, Jennifer A. “Assessing Welfare of Armadillos Using Hormonal & Foraging Indicators, and Patch Use in Argentinean Birds.” 2012. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Howell-Stephens JA. Assessing Welfare of Armadillos Using Hormonal & Foraging Indicators, and Patch Use in Argentinean Birds. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9485.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Howell-Stephens JA. Assessing Welfare of Armadillos Using Hormonal & Foraging Indicators, and Patch Use in Argentinean Birds. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9485

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

2. Czupryna, Anna M. The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

Free-roaming dogs, Canis lupus familiaris, can be both a public health and conservation concern. Between 2010 and 2013 we identified 2,649 dogs in four rural villages in Tanzania. We characterized dog demography and ownership practices and investigated whether vaccination influences dog population dynamics. We found that adult dogs had higher survival than puppies in all villages. We observed a male-biased sex ratio across all age classes and higher adult male dog survival. Within the vaccination villages, vaccinated dogs had a decreased risk of death. However, overall mortality in one non-vaccination village was significantly higher than in the two vaccination villages and other non-vaccination village. Dogs in poor body condition had lower survival than dogs in ideal body condition in all villages. Sickness and spotted hyena, Crocuta crocuta, predation were the two main causes of dog death. Reproductive patterns were similar between vaccination and non-vaccination villages and we observed an overall male-biased litter sex ratio regardless of the mother’s body condition. Dogs were owned and used primarily for livestock and household protection. We found that dog ownership was related to livestock ownership, household size, education, and house type. Thus, the number of dogs increases with household wealth. Stable isotope analyses of dog hair confirmed survey data and indicated that dogs were fed primarily a corn-based diet similar to human diet in the villages.Free-roaming domestic dogs in rural communities exist in the context of their human owners as well as the surrounding wildlife. Our results demonstrate that vaccination alone does not impact domestic dog population dynamics and that they may be mediated by humans. Understanding the role of dogs and their care within these communities is important for planning and implement rabies control measures such as mass dog vaccination. Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, Joel S (advisor), Faust, Lisa J (advisor), Santymire, Rachel M (committee member), Mehta, Supriya D (committee member), Whelan, Christopher J (committee member), Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel (committee member), Brown, Joel S (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Demography; Domestic dog; Free-roaming dog; Non-invasive endocrinology; Rabies; Stable isotopes; Survival analysis; Tanzania

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Czupryna, A. M. (2017). The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21898

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Czupryna, Anna M. “The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21898.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Czupryna, Anna M. “The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.” 2017. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Czupryna AM. The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21898.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Czupryna AM. The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21898

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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