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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Salisbury, Christine L"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Ciupe, Antonela A. Examining Caregivers’ Independence in Early Intervention Home Visit Sessions.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

In recent years, the field of early intervention (EI) has had to cope with a significant increase in the number of children with developmental delays. Given the realities of reduced funding for services and the forthcoming prevalence of children with significant delays, it is even more important to build proficient and independent caregivers. Coaching is the primary mechanism for advancing caregiver capacity in home-based EI sessions; however, little is known about its potential to support caregivers to independently use development-enhancing behaviors associated with positive child outcomes including teaching, responsiveness, encouragement, and affection. Moreover, researchers and providers lack evidence regarding which coaching strategies are best suited to build caregiver independence. Data from a single case multiple baseline across participants study collected through an IES Goal 2 intervention development study (Woods, Salisbury, & Snyder, 2013) were used to examine how a delineated coaching process affected the ability of caregivers to take the lead in promoting their children’s learning in the context of daily activities. In addition, the elements of coaching that correspond to caregiver initiations of development-promoting behaviors were investigated. One EI provider coached four culturally diverse caregivers to use development- enhancing strategies with their children who evidenced moderate-severe disabilities. The coaching process designated by the acronym SOOPR, include targeted information sharing (S), observation and provision of opportunities for the caregiver to practice new skills with provider feedback (OO), problem solving and reflection (P), and review of the EI session (R). Results reveal that all four caregivers increased their initiations of three of four development-promoting behaviors: teaching, responsiveness, and encouragement. The descriptive data across sessions for each triad suggest that as the intervention progressed, the frequency of specific coaching strategies decreased and this may have fostered the caregivers’ opportunities to take the lead in the sessions. In addition, a consistent pattern of direct proportionality between caregiver rate of improvement after the intervention and caregiver initiations during the intervention was also identified. No consistent patterns were found between specific or individual coaching strategies and caregiver initiations. Taken together, findings from this investigation support the overall value of the SOOPR coaching framework and its effectiveness for teaching caregivers to identify learning opportunities and embed interventions strategies in various contexts. Study limitations and implications for research and practice are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Salisbury, Christine L. (advisor), Cushing, Lisa S. (committee member), Maggin, Daniel M. (committee member), Tejero Hughes, Marie (committee member), Thorkildsen, Theresa A. (committee member), Salisbury, Christine L. (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: early intervention; caregiver coaching

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ciupe, A. A. (2017). Examining Caregivers’ Independence in Early Intervention Home Visit Sessions. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22140

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ciupe, Antonela A. “Examining Caregivers’ Independence in Early Intervention Home Visit Sessions.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22140.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ciupe, Antonela A. “Examining Caregivers’ Independence in Early Intervention Home Visit Sessions.” 2017. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Ciupe AA. Examining Caregivers’ Independence in Early Intervention Home Visit Sessions. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22140.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ciupe AA. Examining Caregivers’ Independence in Early Intervention Home Visit Sessions. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22140

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

2. Athamanah, Lindsay Sarah. The Effectiveness of Peer Supports for Students with Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Work-Based Settings.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

Peer-mediated interventions are evidence-based practices that have demonstrated to improve academic and social skills of students with severe disabilities and their peers without disabilities while working in academic and non-academic classrooms (Carter, Cushing, Clark, & Kennedy, 2005; Cushing & Kennedy, 1997). However, little is known about the effects of peer-mediated interventions on vocational and employability skills of students with severe disabilities and their peers in work-based learning settings. Students with severe disabilities do not necessarily learn vocational and employability skills in high school that can be applied to future employment (Agran, Hughes, Thoma, & Scott, 2016). They may also have limited access to inclusive vocational education or work-based learning settings in high school to learn, work, and practice skills with peers without disabilities (Guy, Sitlington, Laresen, & Frank, 2009). Moreover, inclusion in general education settings with peers without disabilities is predictive of later transition success for students with severe disabilities (Test et al., 2009). Therefore, students with severe disabilities should be learning all skills alongside their same-aged peers in inclusive school environments. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of peer-mediated interventions on the independent engagement in work tasks and social interactions of students with severe disabilities and their peers in a high school work-based learning setting. Furthermore, this study evaluated the quality of and the number of social interactions during work activities of both students with and without severe disabilities. A multiple baseline research design across participants with generalization probes investigated work task independence and social interaction outcomes for five dyads of high school students. Dyads were comprised of one student with severe disabilities and one peer without disabilities. The work-based activity involved collecting classroom and office recycling in the high school. Peers were trained on research-based peer support strategies to implement when working with the student with severe disabilities during the work-based activity. Results revealed moderate to significant level changes between baseline and intervention phases across all dyads for increased work task independence and social interactions. Furthermore, the quality of social interactions improved after implementing the peer supports training for most dyads as well as increases were noted in the number of social initiations made by the students with severe disabilities to socialize with their peers. With this study, the success of peer-mediated interventions has been demonstrated by the increase in vocational skills and social interactions for students with severe disabilities when working in inclusive employment settings. This study is the first to use peer-mediated interventions in a high school work-based learning setting. The findings, therefore, substantiate the peer-mediated interventions… Advisors/Committee Members: Cushing, Lisa S (advisor), Salisbury, Christine L (committee member), Maggin, Daniel M (committee member), Lopez-Reyna, Norma (committee member), Brock, Matthew (committee member), Cushing, Lisa S (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: transition; employment; students with severe disabilities; peer-mediated intervention

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Athamanah, L. S. (2017). The Effectiveness of Peer Supports for Students with Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Work-Based Settings. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21967

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Athamanah, Lindsay Sarah. “The Effectiveness of Peer Supports for Students with Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Work-Based Settings.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21967.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Athamanah, Lindsay Sarah. “The Effectiveness of Peer Supports for Students with Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Work-Based Settings.” 2017. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Athamanah LS. The Effectiveness of Peer Supports for Students with Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Work-Based Settings. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21967.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Athamanah LS. The Effectiveness of Peer Supports for Students with Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Work-Based Settings. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21967

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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