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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Nelson, Karin"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Martinez, José-Cristian. Effects of Ecological Restoration on the Leaf-Litter Arthropod Community.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

Current ecological restoration and management programs in forests of the Chicago metropolitan region focus on the removal and control of invasive plant species as a high priority. Additional efforts, such as seeding and selective cutting and burning, aim to alter the composition of herbaceous vegetation and canopy species, with the goal of managing the plant communities. Leaf-litter arthropods are a source of high biodiversity, and as key members of the detrital food web, facilitate the decomposition of organic matter into simple compounds, thereby affecting nutrient cycling between above- and below-ground structures of the plant community. Changes in the plant community caused by both invasive plant species and land management techniques have the potential to alter the detrital community by modifying both the diversity and structure of the leaf litter. This dissertation research examines how the forest leaf-litter arthropod community responds to changing leaf-litter conditions influenced by restoration and management efforts. I investigated how land management and invasive plant leaf litter have impacted the arthropod community at three different scales. At the regional level, I studied how the management history of 28 woodland sites in 4 adjacent counties has affected the leaf litter and leaf-litter arthropod community structure. At the site and microhabitat scale, I researched the colonization and consumption patterns of arthropods on native and invasive litter monocultures and mixed litter treatments. The overall objective of this dissertation is to advance our existing body of knowledge of woodland restoration through four research projects. The first is a study to examine how the detritus-based arthropod community responds to woodland restoration history and individual leaf litter characteristics at 28 sites in northeastern Illinois; the second, I focused on determining if an introduced litter type from an invasive shrub, European Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica), impacts the arthropod leaf-litter colonization rate in a field experiment. In the third study, I investigate how an invasive plant species targeted in woodland restoration efforts, influences the consumption rates of major detritivores in a mixed-litter mesocosm study. Lastly, I examined how direct contact with the leaf litter of the invasive European Buckthron influences the palatability of native canopy species in a cafeteria-style food choice experiment. Finally, I coalesce the findings of the research projects into a general discussion and future research directions. Advisors/Committee Members: Wise, David H (advisor), Sierwald, Petra (committee member), Howe, Henry F (committee member), Nelson, Karin (committee member), Heneghan, Liam (committee member), Wise, David H (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Arthropods; Leaf-litter; Community Structure; Conservation Management; Ecological Restoration; Invasive Plants; Soil nutrients; Isopod; Woodlice; Functional diversity; Leaf litter decomposition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Martinez, J. (2017). Effects of Ecological Restoration on the Leaf-Litter Arthropod Community. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22598

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martinez, José-Cristian. “Effects of Ecological Restoration on the Leaf-Litter Arthropod Community.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22598.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martinez, José-Cristian. “Effects of Ecological Restoration on the Leaf-Litter Arthropod Community.” 2017. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Martinez J. Effects of Ecological Restoration on the Leaf-Litter Arthropod Community. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22598.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Martinez J. Effects of Ecological Restoration on the Leaf-Litter Arthropod Community. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22598

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Troxell-Smith, Sandra M. Welfare Assessment Through Foraging: Understanding the Animals' Points of View.

Degree: 2016, University of Illinois – Chicago

As a behavioral ecologist, I implement studies based in foraging theory and ecology to develop a quantifiable metric to understand animal environmental preferences, and how those preferences influence animal decision-making. I utilized this approach in laboratory, zoo, and wild species, and each of my five dissertation chapters investigates a novel application and integration of foraging ecology and animal behavior. Chapter I: I utilized foraging ecology principles to determine effects of domestication on the problem-solving and foraging strategies of laboratory vs. wild-caught house mice (Mus musculus). Domesticated laboratory strains adopted more energy-efficient foraging strategies, and responded more favorably to foraging challenges than their wild counterparts (Troxell-Smith et. al, 2016). This study advanced existing literature regarding how the domestication process influences problem-solving and resource acquisition in laboratory species. Chapter II: I assessed the environmental preferences of zoo-housed okapi (Okapia johnstoni). Based on intensity of foraging in experimental patches, I found that individuals greatly varied their response to, and utilization of, the same exhibit space. I conclude that individual behavioral differences in environmental preference must be incorporated into animal management and welfare decisions. Chapter III: I implemented foraging patch studies to: a) quantify the efficacy of patch use studies as an enrichment opportunity, and b) determine the spatial and foraging preferences for zoo-housed Parma wallabies (Macropus parma), and Patagonian maras (Dolichotis patagonum). Food patches reliably revealed environmental preferences, increased foraging time, and decreased the frequency of inactive behaviors for both species, demonstrating the utility of implementing the food patch technique as a method to assess captive animal welfare. Chapter IV: I examined the effects of implementing social separation (visual barriers) on stereotypic behavior in an adult female okapi (Troxell-Smith & Miller, 2016). Visual barrier installation drastically reduced okapi stereotypic behavior, suggesting that captive social situations have important impacts on animal welfare. Chapter V: I established personality metrics for ten individual brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in the Ku-Ring-Gai Chase National Park, NSW, Australia. Possums were released and monitored to determine individual differences in food quality preference and response to environmental risk. This work advances understanding of how individual personality traits influence environmental and ecological choices. Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, Joel S. (advisor), Whelan, Christopher J. (committee member), Leonard, John (committee member), Schmidt, Jennifer (committee member), Nelson, Karin (committee member), Watters, Jason V. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Behavioral Ecology; Animal Welfare; Foraging Ecology; Giving-up Density; Behavioral Enrichment; Zoo-housed species; Exhibit use; Landscape of comfort

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Troxell-Smith, S. M. (2016). Welfare Assessment Through Foraging: Understanding the Animals' Points of View. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21246

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Troxell-Smith, Sandra M. “Welfare Assessment Through Foraging: Understanding the Animals' Points of View.” 2016. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21246.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Troxell-Smith, Sandra M. “Welfare Assessment Through Foraging: Understanding the Animals' Points of View.” 2016. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Troxell-Smith SM. Welfare Assessment Through Foraging: Understanding the Animals' Points of View. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21246.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Troxell-Smith SM. Welfare Assessment Through Foraging: Understanding the Animals' Points of View. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21246

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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