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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Mitchell, William A."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Bleicher, Sonny S. Divergent Behaviour amid Convergent Evolution: Common Garden Experiments with Desert Rodents and Vipers.

Degree: 2015, University of Illinois – Chicago

Desert ecosystems worldwide provide examples of convergent evolution for species and entire communities. In a series of common-garden experiments, I compare the communities of granivorous rodents and their predators from North American and Middle Eastern Deserts. I used populations of two Heteromyid rodents from the Mojave Desert and two Gerbillines from the Negev. Each population’s perception of risk of viper species, one known and one from the convergent system, was measured in three steps: initial (at first encounter), over a two month experiment of co-habitation with predators in a semi-natural arena, and post exposure. The initial and post exposure “interviews” revealed that all four rodent species fear most their native viper species. However, after two months of exposure, all four species exhibit greater fear for the sidewinder rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes) from the Mojave, a snake capable of infra-red vision, than for the Saharan horned viper (Cerastes cerastes) from the Negev, a snake “blind” on dark nights. In the semi-natural arena (vivarium), all four species exhibited fear (higher giving-up densities in depletable food patches) of snakes and owls. As evidence of predator facilitation, all four rodents respond to owls by favoring the shrub cover and respond to snakes by favoring the open areas. More subtle responses to moonphase, particular viper species, and interactions of owls and snakes were rodent species specific. The evolutionary history with predators proved to be more important in shaping the evolution of anti-predator strategies than environmental forces of climate, substrate and food availability. Heteromyids, who evolved with heat sensing vipers exhibited fixed strategies that fluctuate in intensity based on the overall risk in the environment. The Gerbillines on the other hand reassess the risk based on the greatest threat in the environment. All species however respond to all vipers with the strategies best suited to the vipers they evolved with. Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, Joel S. (advisor), Berger-Wolf, Tanya Y. (committee member), Mateo, Jill M. (committee member), Mitchell, William A. (committee member), Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. (committee member), Kotler, Burt P. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Allenby’s Gerbil (Gerbillus andersoni allebyi); Behavioural Ecology; Barn owl (Tyto alba); Convergent Evolution; Desert Pocket Mouse (Cheatodipus penicillatus); Desert dunes; Evolutionary Ecology; Gerbilline Rodents; Giving Up Densities (GUDs); Greater Egyptian Gerbil (Gerbillus pyramidum); Habitat Selection; Heteromyid Rodents; Landscapes of Fear; Merriam’s Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys merriami); Optimal Patch Use; Predator-Prey Dynamics; Saharan Horned Viper (Cerastes cerastes); Sidewinder rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bleicher, S. S. (2015). Divergent Behaviour amid Convergent Evolution: Common Garden Experiments with Desert Rodents and Vipers. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19398

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bleicher, Sonny S. “Divergent Behaviour amid Convergent Evolution: Common Garden Experiments with Desert Rodents and Vipers.” 2015. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19398.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bleicher, Sonny S. “Divergent Behaviour amid Convergent Evolution: Common Garden Experiments with Desert Rodents and Vipers.” 2015. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Bleicher SS. Divergent Behaviour amid Convergent Evolution: Common Garden Experiments with Desert Rodents and Vipers. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19398.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bleicher SS. Divergent Behaviour amid Convergent Evolution: Common Garden Experiments with Desert Rodents and Vipers. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19398

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Orlando, Paul A. The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer.

Degree: 2012, University of Illinois – Chicago

I use consumer resource theory and evolutionary game theory in developing theory with regards to physiology, protists, and viruses. I use differential equation consumer resource systems to provide an ecological basis for theoretical exploration. And I use game theory to model natural selection within an ecological context. I investigate the effects of stoichiometric constraints on consumers in a graphical framework. I found that when stoichiometry is integrated into consumer resource models, ecological communities take on a more complex array of possible states. When resource equilibrium abundances are low, ecological communities are nearly identical to those used to characterize animal communities based on substitutable resources. However, when resource equilibrium abundances are high, ecological communities are similar to those used to characterize plant communities based on essential resources. I investigate the effects of species that can switch trophic levels by a morphologic transformation on ecological communities. I found that these species often stabilize population dynamics, which favors each morph as a separate species. I conclude that switching species likely evolve in environments with stochastic resource fluctuations or extrinsic drivers of resource levels. I also found that although switching species can fill diverse ecological niches in a community, they do not necessarily restrict diversity. I investigate the role of digestive physiology coupled with the digestive properties of resources in structuring ecological communities. I found that bulky resources select for large guts with long throughput times, and high energy/volume resources select for small guts and short throughput times. Most resource pairs lead to the evolution of a specialist on the richer resource followed by the invasion and evolution of a generalist. I also applied theory to HPV induced cancers. I hypothesized that HPV faces a life history tradeoff, where HR HPV is persistent but not very infectious, and vice versa for low-risk HPV. We found that different sexual subcultures within the human population could explain the origin and maintenance of these distinct HPV types. Furthermore, I made a PDE model of HPV infection within mucosal tissue to discover the links between cell population dynamics and HPV protein expression. And how somatic evolution of cells produces tissue level changes. I found that HPV’s proteins likely increase the density of tissue at which cells can divide and possibly also slow the migration rate of cells to the skin surface. I also found that somatic evolution is an alternative explanation for tissue level changes observed during high-risk HPV infection. Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, Joel S. (advisor), Mitchell, William A. (committee member), Grande, Terry (committee member), Buhse, Howard E. (committee member), Whelan, Christopher J. (committee member), Nyberg, Dennis W. (committee member), Gatenby, Robert A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Evolutionary game theory; Consumer-reosurce model; Community structure; Ecological stoichiometry; Polymorphic species; Human Papillomavirus; Oncogenic Virus

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Orlando, P. A. (2012). The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9573

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Orlando, Paul A. “The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer.” 2012. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9573.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Orlando, Paul A. “The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer.” 2012. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Orlando PA. The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9573.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Orlando PA. The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9573

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.