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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("King, Meggan"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Jones, Shan Mei. Development of Microcrystal Tests for Butylone, Ethylone, and Methylone Detection.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

Microcrystal tests are a microchemistry technique developed in the 1800’s. Recently, they have been used more frequently in forensic science to help identify drugs of abuse, such as amphetamine and cocaine. Microcrystal tests are advantageous due to relatively short analysis time, small sample quantity used during test, and little to no sample preparation. Since microcrystal tests have only recently started to be used in forensic science again, validated methods are required, before they can be used. While microcrystal tests have been developed for many common drugs of abuse, newer drugs of abuse do not have validated tests, among which are the synthetic cathinones. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis was to develop microcrystal tests that could detect butylone, ethylone, and methylone, through optical characteristics of precipitated crystals. Synthetic cathinones, street name “Bath Salts”, are newer drugs of abuse that are man-made compounds similar to cathinone. They have become more prominent on the illegal drug market since 2010. Cathinone is a naturally occurring compound found in khat (Catha edulis) leaves. Since cathinone, and subsequently synthetic cathinones, is a stimulant, increased euphoria, alertness, sexual arousal, sociability, concentration, and motivation can occur upon administration. Since 2010, synthetic cathinones have become more prominent on the illegal drug market; signifying, validated microcrystal tests could be beneficial. Microcrystal tests were successfully developed to detect butylone, ethylone, and methylone individually and in the presence of adulterants. Each test utilized either pricrolonic or picric acid as the reagent. All three drugs were identified by precipitation of rosettes. Methylone formed rosettes with both reagents. All four crystals are distinguishable either by reagent used or optical properties. Also, attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy was performed on each drug and butylone and methylone crystals precipitated from picrolonic acid, for reference purposes. These tests are unique since no other drug is known to produce the same crystals and optical characteristics with these reagents; thus, they are good options for use in forensic science. Advisors/Committee Members: Larsen, Karl (advisor), Hall, Ashley (committee member), Schlemmer, Francis (committee member), King, Meggan (committee member), Larsen, Karl (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Microcrystal; Microcrystal Test; Butylone; Ethylone; Methylone; Cathinone; Synthetic Cathinone; Bath Salts; Picrolonic Acid; Picric Acid; Microscopy; PLM; ATR

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jones, S. M. (2017). Development of Microcrystal Tests for Butylone, Ethylone, and Methylone Detection. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22068

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, Shan Mei. “Development of Microcrystal Tests for Butylone, Ethylone, and Methylone Detection.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed August 06, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22068.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, Shan Mei. “Development of Microcrystal Tests for Butylone, Ethylone, and Methylone Detection.” 2017. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Jones SM. Development of Microcrystal Tests for Butylone, Ethylone, and Methylone Detection. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22068.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jones SM. Development of Microcrystal Tests for Butylone, Ethylone, and Methylone Detection. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22068

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

2. Turney, Casey. Creating an Aqueous Precipitation and Crystal Table for Microcrystal Tests of Common Illicit Drugs.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

When it comes to preliminary testing in forensic science laboratories, a method that is simple, fast, reliable, inexpensive, and non-destructive is desirable. Most methods only fulfill a few of these requests or require complex instrumentation. Microcrystal tests not only meet these requirements, but they also only need a polarized light microscope (which most forensic science laboratories already own). It provides an easy way to test for commonly abused drugs that are found in many different forms. To help make microcrystal test methods more accessible, McCrone Research Institute published “A Modern Compendium of Microcrystal Tests” which provides thirty-four different methods to test for twenty-one drugs. The methods in this compendium had never been cross checked with every drug so it was not known if the crystals were truly unique. This led to a need to test every method with every drug in the compendium. After the completion of testing, the data generated was used to create an aqueous precipitation and crystal table. At first glance this table showed that not every crystal cited in the compendium was unique to a specific drug. By observing all the optical properties that can be obtained by using a polarized light microscope however, the crystals formed by different drugs were still distinguishable from one another for most of the methods. The methods using picric acid to test for methylphenidate and dilituric acid to test for pseudoephedrine were shown to produce indistinguishable crystals for multiple drugs when using fast and reliable methods. More complex testing allows for an identification, but this would go against the point of using a microcrystal test as a preliminary means of identification. Looking at the aqueous precipitation and crystal table, thirty-two of the thirty-four methods produced unique crystals and some combination of these methods still allows for an identification of all twenty-one drugs. The aqueous precipitation and crystal table also proves to be a great identification tool for use in testing. Advisors/Committee Members: Larsen, Albert K (advisor), Hall, Ashley (committee member), King, Meggan (committee member), Schlemmer , Raymond F (committee member), Larsen, Albert K (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Microcrystal Tests; Illicit Drugs; McCrone Research Institute

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Turney, C. (2017). Creating an Aqueous Precipitation and Crystal Table for Microcrystal Tests of Common Illicit Drugs. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22178

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Turney, Casey. “Creating an Aqueous Precipitation and Crystal Table for Microcrystal Tests of Common Illicit Drugs.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed August 06, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22178.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Turney, Casey. “Creating an Aqueous Precipitation and Crystal Table for Microcrystal Tests of Common Illicit Drugs.” 2017. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Turney C. Creating an Aqueous Precipitation and Crystal Table for Microcrystal Tests of Common Illicit Drugs. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22178.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Turney C. Creating an Aqueous Precipitation and Crystal Table for Microcrystal Tests of Common Illicit Drugs. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22178

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.