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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Caskey, Rachel N"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Estrella, Mayra L. Place Attachment, Civic Engagement, and Collective Well-Being among Chicago’s Puerto Rican Youth.

Degree: 2015, University of Illinois – Chicago

The purpose of this qualitative case study was to address critical gaps in the literature about the meanings of place attachment and its role in promoting civic behaviors that contribute to collective well-being among civically engaged Puerto Rican youth. To further knowledge in this area, I utilized community-based participatory approaches and employed qualitative methods, including group discussions, photography, and written narratives in a methodology known as Photovoice. In collaboration with a community-based organization located in Chicago, Illinois, a purposive sample of twelve civically engaged Puerto Rican youth (ages 16–20) participated in ten Photovoice sessions as co-researchers. They took photos of places in the community setting that evoked feelings of place attachment and reflected on why these places have special meanings. Study findings informed the development of a refined conceptual model to help better understand the relationship between place attachment, civic engagement, and collective well-being. To my knowledge, this is the first study focused on examining both the context of developing attachment to place and the behavioral consequences of attachment among civically engaged Puerto Rican youth. Results showed that a sense of attachment was critical in shaping the ways in which youth participate in community-based health promotion efforts. The attachment to the community prepared youth to be critically involved in civic engagement activities of the community based organization. The youth co-researchers’ involvement in the community was a positive coping mechanism for overcoming obstacles as they framed personal problems within a collective narrative. Finally, for the participants, civic engagement was an expression of active resistance and a way of overcoming the traumatic experiences of racism and inequality. The findings from this study demonstrated that youth can be positive agents of change in their communities and can contribute to improve collective well-being. Further, these findings could inform public health programs that engage Latino and other minority youth in community-based health promotion efforts. Advisors/Committee Members: Kelley, Michele A. (advisor), Altfeld, Susan (committee member), Peacock, Nadine (committee member), Flores-Gonzalez, Nilda (committee member), Caskey, Rachel N. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Adolescent health; Puerto Rican youth; Photovoice; CBPR; Place attachment; Sociopolitical development; Collective well-being; Wellness; Civic engagement; Health promotion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Estrella, M. L. (2015). Place Attachment, Civic Engagement, and Collective Well-Being among Chicago’s Puerto Rican Youth. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19390

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Estrella, Mayra L. “Place Attachment, Civic Engagement, and Collective Well-Being among Chicago’s Puerto Rican Youth.” 2015. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19390.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Estrella, Mayra L. “Place Attachment, Civic Engagement, and Collective Well-Being among Chicago’s Puerto Rican Youth.” 2015. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Estrella ML. Place Attachment, Civic Engagement, and Collective Well-Being among Chicago’s Puerto Rican Youth. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19390.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Estrella ML. Place Attachment, Civic Engagement, and Collective Well-Being among Chicago’s Puerto Rican Youth. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19390

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

2. Harrington, Rachel L. Multimorbidity and Condition Clustering in Children & Adolescents: Resource Use, Expenditures & Quality.

Degree: 2019, University of Illinois – Chicago

The goal of this dissertation was to describe the patterns of multimorbidity among children in the United States, and to examine the role multimorbidity plays in pediatric healthcare resource utilization and quality of care. This work was conceptualized and executed as four separate studies, two in the general pediatric population, and two among early survivors of pediatric cancer (children under 18 who were a minimum of 2 years out from end of active therapy). All studies were conducted in a national, commercially-insured, cohort of children identified in the Truven Marketscan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database (2009-2014). The first study examined healthcare resource utilization associated with multimorbidity among children with chronic illness. Latent class analysis was used to identify eight comorbidity groups. The “Attention Deficit” group was the largest (22.1%), while the highest resource utilization was observed among children belonging to the “Developmental Disorder” group (mean annual expenditures of 24,606). The second study examined differences in quality of care in the same population. Only 55% of children achieved quality benchmarks (scores ≥75%). Compared to children with one chronic condition, the lowest quality was experienced by the “Mood Disorders” group (Odds Ratio [OR]: 0.6, Confidence Interval [CI]: 0.5-0.6), while highest was the “Chronic Otitis Media” group (OR: 1.9, CI: 1.9-2.0). The third study focused on early survivors of pediatric cancer, the number of chronic conditions they experienced, and associated resource utilization. Over 20% of survivors had at least one chronic condition, and 36.3% had multiple. Compared to survivors without chronic conditions, the presence of multimorbidity significantly increased the odds of an emergency department visit (OR: 1.7, CI: 1.4-2.1), and of a hospitalization (OR: 3.8, CI: 2.5-5.5). The fourth study built on this work by identifying five comorbidity groups among the early survivor population to further explore differences in utilization. Compared to survivors without chronic conditions, membership in the “Central Nervous System” (CNS) group was significantly associated with the highest expenditures (25,370), while membership in “CNS with Endocrine” had the highest odds of hospitalization (OR: 5.0, CI: 2.3-10.7). Overall, this dissertation provides a new way of conceptualizing and evaluating the burden of chronic conditions in the pediatric population. By linking epidemiologic, resource utilization and quality evidence in this population, results of this work highlight the existence of subgroups of children for whom additional clinical care and policy interventions may be warranted in the current environment of value-based healthcare. Advisors/Committee Members: Lee, Todd A (advisor), Schumock, Glen T (committee member), Qato, Dima M (committee member), Antoon, James W (committee member), Caskey, Rachel N (committee member), Lee, Todd A (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: multimorbidity; children; pediatric; cancer survivorship; quality of care; healthcare utilization

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harrington, R. L. (2019). Multimorbidity and Condition Clustering in Children & Adolescents: Resource Use, Expenditures & Quality. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/23689

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harrington, Rachel L. “Multimorbidity and Condition Clustering in Children & Adolescents: Resource Use, Expenditures & Quality.” 2019. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/23689.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harrington, Rachel L. “Multimorbidity and Condition Clustering in Children & Adolescents: Resource Use, Expenditures & Quality.” 2019. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Harrington RL. Multimorbidity and Condition Clustering in Children & Adolescents: Resource Use, Expenditures & Quality. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2019. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/23689.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harrington RL. Multimorbidity and Condition Clustering in Children & Adolescents: Resource Use, Expenditures & Quality. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/23689

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Redman, Sarah. Media Influence on Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Decision-Making Behavior.

Degree: 2013, University of Illinois – Chicago

Approximately 79 million people are currently infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV), making it the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the United States. Unlike other STIs, HPV typically goes away on its own within two years of infection. However, some persistent cases can lead to genital warts or various types of cancers. While there is no cure for HPV, two vaccines have been approved to prevent some of the most common strains of the infection. Both vaccines protect against HPV 16 and 18, the two strains that cause the majority of HPV-related cancer. In addition, one vaccine also prevents strains 6 and 11, the two types responsible for 90% of genital warts. After vaccine licensure, each company launched advertising campaigns to promote their product as cervical cancer prevention. In the last few years, advertising has become a significant source of information for key vaccine decision-makers (males and females ages 18-26 and parents of youth ages 11-17). However, little research has been conducted to examine how direct-to-consumer ads frame the HPV vaccine, what audiences learn from them, or how they target underlying beliefs about getting the vaccine. This research sought to contribute to this gap in the literature. Relying on a mixed methods approach, this study examines how direct-to-consumer ads influence parental and adolescent beliefs about HPV and the HPV vaccine through discourse analysis and focus groups. First, discourse analysis was used to examine how eight direct-to-consumer ads frame HPV and the HPV vaccine and in turn how this framing reflects and shapes social norms on this topic. Next, the same ads were shown to focus groups of vaccine decision-makers to measure short-term knowledge change about HPV and the HPV vaccine based on the ads. Focus groups also captured broader reactions to ads. The findings from this research are presented in a series of three manuscripts: the first presents findings from the discourse analysis of the ads; the second examines vaccine decision-maker knowledge change as a result of watching the ads; and the third maps underlying belief constructs to the themes in the discourse analysis and the focus groups. Advisors/Committee Members: Fagen, Michael C. (advisor), Caskey, Rachel N. (committee member), Peacock, Nadine (committee member), Mehta, Supriya (committee member), Papacharissi, Zizi (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Human papillomavirus; vaccine; sexually transmitted infection; media; message framing; focus groups; discourse analysis; advertising

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Redman, S. (2013). Media Influence on Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Decision-Making Behavior. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/10246

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Redman, Sarah. “Media Influence on Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Decision-Making Behavior.” 2013. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed February 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/10246.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Redman, Sarah. “Media Influence on Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Decision-Making Behavior.” 2013. Web. 25 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Redman S. Media Influence on Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Decision-Making Behavior. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2013. [cited 2021 Feb 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/10246.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Redman S. Media Influence on Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Decision-Making Behavior. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/10246

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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