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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Buhse, Howard E."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Konior, Katarzyna. Tale of Two Proteins Sfi1p-like and Centrin: Modeling of Contraction and Relaxation in V. convallaria.

Degree: 2013, University of Illinois – Chicago

Vorticella convallaria, a polymorphic ciliated protozoan tethered to the substrate by an elongated stalk, exhibits a unique contractile system that does not require ATP hydrolysis. The contractile organelles, myonemes and the spasmoneme, are mainly composed of calcium-binding proteins (centrins and spasmins) and are believed to form the 2-5 nm filaments. This calcium-mediated centrin-based cytoskeletal network induces coordinated contraction of the myonemes in the cell body with a concomitant coiling of the spasmoneme of the stalk. A similar fiber network has been described in Paramecium, where the contractile behavior of the infraciliary lattice (a structure equivalent to Vorticella myonemes and spasmoneme) is regulated by the interaction of the two major components: calcium and centrin/centrin-binding (Sfi1-like) protein complex. A centrin-binding (Sfi1-like) protein, a large protein with tightly bound tandemly arranged centrin molecules, constitutes a flexible backbone of the contractile network. In the presence of calcium, the calcium-sensing centrin proteins undergo a conformational change inducing shortening of the filaments and, therefore, supercoiling of the centrin/ centrin-binding (Sfi1-like) protein complex. Immuno-localization studies using anti-human Sfi1 and anti-centrin antibodies in Vorticella, showed that they localize to the myonemes and the spasmoneme. Additionally, the anti-human Sfi1 antibody recognized several oral structures within the cell body including haplo- and polykineties, infundibulum, ciliary wreath, and the cell body-stalk transition zone. Functional studies revealed that microgram quantities of anti-human Sfi1 and anti centrin/spasmin antibodies were sufficient to significantly reduce contraction in glycerol extracted stalk models. We applied a far western technique to search for centrin binding partners. We demonstrated that centrin bound several lower molecular proteins in the range of 20 kDa, suggesting centrin-centerin interactions. Moreover, two higher molecular proteins (over 200 kDa) were detected, result consistent with our hypothesis of the presence of the potential centrin-binding (Sfi1-like) proteins in Vorticella. In modeling the movement mechanism of Vorticella we proposed that this centrin-based cellular motility depends on at least two molecular components, centrins/spasmins and centrin-binding (Sfi1-like) proteins. Advisors/Committee Members: Orenic, Terasa (advisor), Buhse, Howard E. (committee member), McCutcheon, Suzanne M. (committee member), Schmidt, Jennifer (committee member), Okkema, Peter (committee member), Clamp, John (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: calcium; centrin; centrin-binding protein; contraction/relaxation; myoneme; spasmoneme; Vorticella

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Konior, K. (2013). Tale of Two Proteins Sfi1p-like and Centrin: Modeling of Contraction and Relaxation in V. convallaria. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9778

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Konior, Katarzyna. “Tale of Two Proteins Sfi1p-like and Centrin: Modeling of Contraction and Relaxation in V. convallaria.” 2013. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9778.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Konior, Katarzyna. “Tale of Two Proteins Sfi1p-like and Centrin: Modeling of Contraction and Relaxation in V. convallaria.” 2013. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Konior K. Tale of Two Proteins Sfi1p-like and Centrin: Modeling of Contraction and Relaxation in V. convallaria. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9778.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Konior K. Tale of Two Proteins Sfi1p-like and Centrin: Modeling of Contraction and Relaxation in V. convallaria. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9778

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Orlando, Paul A. The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer.

Degree: 2012, University of Illinois – Chicago

I use consumer resource theory and evolutionary game theory in developing theory with regards to physiology, protists, and viruses. I use differential equation consumer resource systems to provide an ecological basis for theoretical exploration. And I use game theory to model natural selection within an ecological context. I investigate the effects of stoichiometric constraints on consumers in a graphical framework. I found that when stoichiometry is integrated into consumer resource models, ecological communities take on a more complex array of possible states. When resource equilibrium abundances are low, ecological communities are nearly identical to those used to characterize animal communities based on substitutable resources. However, when resource equilibrium abundances are high, ecological communities are similar to those used to characterize plant communities based on essential resources. I investigate the effects of species that can switch trophic levels by a morphologic transformation on ecological communities. I found that these species often stabilize population dynamics, which favors each morph as a separate species. I conclude that switching species likely evolve in environments with stochastic resource fluctuations or extrinsic drivers of resource levels. I also found that although switching species can fill diverse ecological niches in a community, they do not necessarily restrict diversity. I investigate the role of digestive physiology coupled with the digestive properties of resources in structuring ecological communities. I found that bulky resources select for large guts with long throughput times, and high energy/volume resources select for small guts and short throughput times. Most resource pairs lead to the evolution of a specialist on the richer resource followed by the invasion and evolution of a generalist. I also applied theory to HPV induced cancers. I hypothesized that HPV faces a life history tradeoff, where HR HPV is persistent but not very infectious, and vice versa for low-risk HPV. We found that different sexual subcultures within the human population could explain the origin and maintenance of these distinct HPV types. Furthermore, I made a PDE model of HPV infection within mucosal tissue to discover the links between cell population dynamics and HPV protein expression. And how somatic evolution of cells produces tissue level changes. I found that HPV’s proteins likely increase the density of tissue at which cells can divide and possibly also slow the migration rate of cells to the skin surface. I also found that somatic evolution is an alternative explanation for tissue level changes observed during high-risk HPV infection. Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, Joel S. (advisor), Mitchell, William A. (committee member), Grande, Terry (committee member), Buhse, Howard E. (committee member), Whelan, Christopher J. (committee member), Nyberg, Dennis W. (committee member), Gatenby, Robert A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Evolutionary game theory; Consumer-reosurce model; Community structure; Ecological stoichiometry; Polymorphic species; Human Papillomavirus; Oncogenic Virus

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Orlando, P. A. (2012). The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9573

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Orlando, Paul A. “The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer.” 2012. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9573.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Orlando, Paul A. “The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer.” 2012. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Orlando PA. The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9573.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Orlando PA. The Evolutionary ecology of physiological constraints in ecological communities and HPV-induced cancer. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9573

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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