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You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Bishop, Jeffrey R."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Drozda, Katarzyna. Warfarin Pharmacogenomic Implementation: Implications for Minorities and Opportunities for Education.

Degree: 2014, University of Illinois – Chicago

Recent clinical trial results cast doubt on the utility of genotype-guided warfarin dosing, specifically showing worse dosing with a pharmacogenetic versus clinical dosing algorithm in African Americans. However, trials did not include many genotypes important in African Americans. We aimed to determine if omission of the CYP2C9*5, *6, *8, *11 and rs12777823G>A genotypes affects performance of pharmacogenetic dosing algorithms in African Americans. In a cohort of 274 warfarin-treated African Americans, we examined the association between CYP2C9*5, *6, *8, *11 and rs12777823G>A genotypes and warfarin dose prediction error with pharmacogenetic algorithms used in clinical trials. The warfarindosing.org algorithm over-estimated doses by a median (IQR) of 1.2 (0.02 to 2.6) mg/day in rs12777823 heterozygotes (p<0.001 for predicted versus observed doses), by 2.0 (0.6 to 2.8) mg/day with the rs12777823 A homozygotes (p=0.004), and by 2.2 (0.5 to 2.9) mg/day in carriers of a CYP2C9 variant (p<0.001). The International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC) algorithm under-dosed warfarin by 0.8 (-2.3 to 0.4) mg/day for patients with the rs12777823 GG genotype (p<0.001) and over-dosed warfarin by 0.7 (-0.4 to 1.9) mg/day in carriers of a variant CYP2C9 allele (p=0.04). Modifying the warfarindosing.org algorithm to adjust for variants important in African Americans led to better dose prediction than either the original warfarindosing.org (p<0.01) or IWPC (p<0.01) algorithms. These data suggest that, when providing genotype-guided warfarin dosing, it is important to account for variants prevalent in African Americans to avoid significant dosing error in this population. Advisors/Committee Members: Zwanziger, Jack (advisor), Bishop, Jeffrey R. (committee member), Cavallari, Larisa H. (committee member), Nutescu, Edith A. (committee member), Schumock, Glen T. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Pharmacogenomics; warfarin; genotype; CYP2C9; rs12777823

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Drozda, K. (2014). Warfarin Pharmacogenomic Implementation: Implications for Minorities and Opportunities for Education. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19063

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Drozda, Katarzyna. “Warfarin Pharmacogenomic Implementation: Implications for Minorities and Opportunities for Education.” 2014. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19063.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Drozda, Katarzyna. “Warfarin Pharmacogenomic Implementation: Implications for Minorities and Opportunities for Education.” 2014. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Drozda K. Warfarin Pharmacogenomic Implementation: Implications for Minorities and Opportunities for Education. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19063.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Drozda K. Warfarin Pharmacogenomic Implementation: Implications for Minorities and Opportunities for Education. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19063

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

2. Sundermann, Erin E. Genetic Predictors of Cognition and Prefrontal Function in Women with HIV.

Degree: 2012, University of Illinois – Chicago

The HIV virus enters the central nervous system (CNS) leading to neurological and cognitive complications. Mild neurocognitive impairment persists in approximately 45% of HIV-infected individuals particularly in the domains of executive function, learning and memory. The Val158Met (rs4680) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) impacts executive function and prefrontal function through its effect on dopamine metabolism. Both HIV and the Val allele of the Val158Met SNP have been associated with compromised executive function and inefficient brain processing. Therefore, this study involved both behavioral and imaging substudies to determine the independent and interactive effects of HIV serostatus and COMT genotype on working memory in women and the neural systems underlying this effect. For the behavioral study, participants included 54 HIV-infected women (33 Met allele carriers, 21 Val/Val) and 33 HIV-uninfected women (12 Met allele carriers, 21 Val/Val). Participants completed the 0-, 1- and 2-back conditions of the N-back, a working memory test. Results showed that HIV-infected women demonstrated significantly worse N-back performance compared to HIV-uninfected women (p < 0.05). A significant serostatus by genotype interaction (p < 0.01) revealed that, among Val/Val, but not Met allele carriers, HIV-infected women performed significantly worse than HIV-uninfected controls across N-back conditions (p < 0.01). For the imaging study, 33 women (20 HIV-infected, 13 HIV-uninfected women) underwent fMRI assessments while completing the N-back task. Similar to behavioral findings, the imaging analysis showed that serostatus and genotype interacted to impact brain activation (p < 0.01). HIV-infected, Val/Val carriers showed significantly greater brain activation in the anterior cingulate and prefrontal regions compared to HIV-uninfected, Val/Val carriers. Conversely, HIV-uninfected, Met allele carriers demonstrated significantly greater brain activation in the anterior cingulate and a prefrontal region compared to HIV-infected, Met allele carriers. Perhaps the association between HIV infection and working memory deficits and inefficient brain processing is driven by individuals with suboptimal, prefrontal dopamine levels (Val/Val). Findings highlight dopamine dysfunction as a neural mechanism underlying HIV-neurocognitive disorders and suggest that the decrease in dopamine signaling that results from the combination of HIV and the Val/Val genotype contributes to a vulnerability to working memory impairment. Advisors/Committee Members: Maki, Pauline M. (advisor), Ragozzino, Michael (committee member), Roitman, Mitchell (committee member), Martin, Eileen (committee member), Bishop, Jeffrey R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Human Immunodefeciency Virus; catechol-o-methltransferase; working memory; COMT; neuroimaging; prefrontal function

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sundermann, E. E. (2012). Genetic Predictors of Cognition and Prefrontal Function in Women with HIV. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9287

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sundermann, Erin E. “Genetic Predictors of Cognition and Prefrontal Function in Women with HIV.” 2012. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9287.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sundermann, Erin E. “Genetic Predictors of Cognition and Prefrontal Function in Women with HIV.” 2012. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Sundermann EE. Genetic Predictors of Cognition and Prefrontal Function in Women with HIV. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9287.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sundermann EE. Genetic Predictors of Cognition and Prefrontal Function in Women with HIV. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/9287

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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