Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Illinois – Chicago" +contributor:("Bielby, William"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Illinois – Chicago

1. Giffort, Danielle M. The Rip Van Winkle Science: Credibility Struggles in the "Psychedelic Renaissance".

Degree: 2015, University of Illinois – Chicago

My dissertation traces the historical trajectory of science and psychedelics. I explain (1) why clinical research with psychedelic drugs was relegated to the status of forbidden knowledge, and (2) how contemporary scientists are working to restore the legitimacy of this scientific field. I draw on science studies literatures on credibility, boundary work, and nonknowledge as a starting point to answer these questions. My analysis is informed by semi-structured interviews, field observations, and historical and archival documents. The analysis that I present in this dissertation can be summarized as follows: The shifting boundaries of psychedelic science, from legitimate knowledge to forbidden knowledge and potentially back to legitimate knowledge again, have been shaped by struggles over the purity and pollution of science—struggles embedded in cultural, legal, and political systems of power. The main contribution of this dissertation is the concept of the impure scientist. While previous literature has considered how nonscientist “outsiders” threaten the purity of science, my research examines how scientist “insiders” contaminate these borders. I call this menacing figure the impure scientist—a historically and culturally contingent and institutionally embedded figure, a “performative image that can be inhabited,” who continually threatens the symbolic boundaries of science. My research demonstrates how the impure scientist is symbolically deployed in credibility contests over the production of legitimate knowledge. By introducing the concept of the impure scientist, this dissertation offers new insights about what knowledge gets produced, embedded in what systems of power, and with what consequences. Advisors/Committee Members: Bielby, William (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Credibility; Boundary Work; Forbidden Knowledge; Non-knowledge; Psychedelic Drugs; Psychedelic Science

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Giffort, D. M. (2015). The Rip Van Winkle Science: Credibility Struggles in the "Psychedelic Renaissance". (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19782

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Giffort, Danielle M. “The Rip Van Winkle Science: Credibility Struggles in the "Psychedelic Renaissance".” 2015. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19782.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Giffort, Danielle M. “The Rip Van Winkle Science: Credibility Struggles in the "Psychedelic Renaissance".” 2015. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Giffort DM. The Rip Van Winkle Science: Credibility Struggles in the "Psychedelic Renaissance". [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19782.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Giffort DM. The Rip Van Winkle Science: Credibility Struggles in the "Psychedelic Renaissance". [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19782

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

2. Carter, Courtney M. The Institutionalization of Diversity at an HBCU and Its Implications for Racialized School Mission.

Degree: 2015, University of Illinois – Chicago

In this dissertation I explore the process of institutionalizing diversity within a public Historically Black College/University (HBCU). Drawing from qualitative interviews, field observations, and archived materials I focus on the introduction of diversity policies, practices and discourses within a space structured by racial meanings, a black institutional space. As a black institutional space, the school developed its own racial logic that informed organizational values and norms. I found that university decision-makers used the organizational logic to craft a diversity agenda meant to reinforce their commitment to their traditional constituents. However, while not resulting in significant demographic changes, the university’s diversity project involved messages about race and citizenship that were at odds with the school’s traditional racial discourse. I concluded that institutionalizing diversity was an effort to gain legitimacy by demonstrating that the school was disseminating those ideas about racial difference that are normative in the field of higher education. This research contributes to the scholarship on race in organizations, demonstrating the ways in which organizations are ordered by race, an insight that has significant implications for our understanding of the reproduction of racial inequality in organizational life. Advisors/Committee Members: Bielby, William (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Diversity; HBCUs; Racialized Space; Isomorphsim

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carter, C. M. (2015). The Institutionalization of Diversity at an HBCU and Its Implications for Racialized School Mission. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19845

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carter, Courtney M. “The Institutionalization of Diversity at an HBCU and Its Implications for Racialized School Mission.” 2015. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19845.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carter, Courtney M. “The Institutionalization of Diversity at an HBCU and Its Implications for Racialized School Mission.” 2015. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Carter CM. The Institutionalization of Diversity at an HBCU and Its Implications for Racialized School Mission. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19845.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Carter CM. The Institutionalization of Diversity at an HBCU and Its Implications for Racialized School Mission. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19845

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

3. Schaffner, Caleb H. Paths Out of Religion: A Cartography of Atheism.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

This project examines sources of variation among the wide array of individuals who describe themselves as ‘atheist.’ Broadly speaking, I hypothesize the continuing influence of factors such as childhood religiosity, time-period, and organizational affiliation explain a portion of the variation between atheists. A mixed-method analysis drew a sample of atheists raised in religion, utilizing recruitment flyers throughout Chicagoland and neighboring states. 201 online surveys and fifty semi-structured interviews polled respondents about their religious upbringings, experiences questioning and leaving religion, and current stances and definitions surrounding atheism. Analysis finds religious intensity in respondents’ upbringings exerts influence over the misgivings they experienced with their childhood religion, eventually culminating in exit from theism. Childhood religious intensity also exerts direct and indirect influence on present-day beliefs: specific mentions of residual, dogmatism, and one’s symbolic boundaries around atheism. Respondents’ decision to affiliate with an atheist group stemmed from zealotry and earlier social networks, though precise motivations differ widely between atheists, and may change over one’s lifetime. Finally, there is a cohort effect in how atheists wish to engage religion: early cohorts stress a battle centered around rights, while later cohorts focus on stewardship and human progress. Overall, these findings yield support for residual effects from one’s childhood religion, as well as influence from the broader social and political climate outside one’s household and previous community of worship. The study also lays the groundwork for future research, cataloguing a spectrum of variation in definitions of atheism and epistemological stances concerning the (non)existence of god. Advisors/Committee Members: Bielby, William (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: atheism; religion

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schaffner, C. H. (2017). Paths Out of Religion: A Cartography of Atheism. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22033

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schaffner, Caleb H. “Paths Out of Religion: A Cartography of Atheism.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22033.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schaffner, Caleb H. “Paths Out of Religion: A Cartography of Atheism.” 2017. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Schaffner CH. Paths Out of Religion: A Cartography of Atheism. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22033.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Schaffner CH. Paths Out of Religion: A Cartography of Atheism. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/22033

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.