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You searched for +publisher:"University of Houston" +contributor:("Thiessen, Amber"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Houston

1. Richardson, Casey K. EFFECTIVENESS OF GIST REASONING TRAINING IN IMPROVING DISCOURSE, VERBAL REASONING, AND GENERAL COGNITIVE PROCESSES IN AN ADULT WITH RIGHT-HEMISPHERE DAMAGE.

Degree: MA, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 2016, University of Houston

There is limited research investigating treatments targeted at remediating cognitive-communicative deficits associated with right hemisphere damage. This single case study investigated the efficacy of using a gist-based approach with an adult in the chronic stage of recovery from right-hemisphere damage. After treatment, the participant made gains in some aspects of verbal reasoning, sustained attention, and perceived communicative ability. However, results indicated no global improvement in cognition. Gains in verbal reasoning and sustaining attention were maintained up to six weeks after treatment ended. The results suggest that this gist-based treatment approach is feasible for improving verbal reasoning individuals with RHD. Remediation of deficits in this area is of importance to the individuals with RHD as well as their families and friends because understanding each other’s stories and ideas is an important aspect of our communication. Advisors/Committee Members: Blake, Margaret Lehman (advisor), Thiessen, Amber (committee member), Ott, Summer D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Right hemisphere damage (RHD); Verbal reasoning; Discourse; Pragmatics; Cognition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Richardson, C. K. (2016). EFFECTIVENESS OF GIST REASONING TRAINING IN IMPROVING DISCOURSE, VERBAL REASONING, AND GENERAL COGNITIVE PROCESSES IN AN ADULT WITH RIGHT-HEMISPHERE DAMAGE. (Masters Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1478

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Richardson, Casey K. “EFFECTIVENESS OF GIST REASONING TRAINING IN IMPROVING DISCOURSE, VERBAL REASONING, AND GENERAL COGNITIVE PROCESSES IN AN ADULT WITH RIGHT-HEMISPHERE DAMAGE.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed January 21, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1478.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Richardson, Casey K. “EFFECTIVENESS OF GIST REASONING TRAINING IN IMPROVING DISCOURSE, VERBAL REASONING, AND GENERAL COGNITIVE PROCESSES IN AN ADULT WITH RIGHT-HEMISPHERE DAMAGE.” 2016. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Richardson CK. EFFECTIVENESS OF GIST REASONING TRAINING IN IMPROVING DISCOURSE, VERBAL REASONING, AND GENERAL COGNITIVE PROCESSES IN AN ADULT WITH RIGHT-HEMISPHERE DAMAGE. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Houston; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1478.

Council of Science Editors:

Richardson CK. EFFECTIVENESS OF GIST REASONING TRAINING IN IMPROVING DISCOURSE, VERBAL REASONING, AND GENERAL COGNITIVE PROCESSES IN AN ADULT WITH RIGHT-HEMISPHERE DAMAGE. [Masters Thesis]. University of Houston; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1478


University of Houston

2. Clark, Amanda. Changes in Discourse Production Following Left Hemisphere Stroke.

Degree: MA, Communication Disorders, 2018, University of Houston

Discourse is any unit of connected speech longer than a sentence, organized sequentially and logically, to effectively communicate a group of ideas to a listener (Kong, 2016). Discourse can become impaired following injury to the brain, resulting in either acute impairments that get better over time, or residual chronic communication impairments (e.g., aphasia). This study used a modified multi-level analysis developed by Marini and colleagues (2011, 2012, 2014, 2015) comprised of microlinguistic and macrolinguistic variables to examine whether acute left hemisphere stroke patients experience deficits in discourse and how those deficits change over time as reorganization and recovery takes place. A picture naming task and a narrative retell task were administered to 16 patients at bedside acutely (2-7 days post stroke), then again sub-acutely (1-3 months post stroke), and the results of the discourse measures were compared with the data of 14 control subjects. Results indicated that 69% of our population had some type of discourse deficit acutely, either microlinguistic or macrolinguistic, compared with the data from controls. For our population at the acute stage, 69% of subjects showed deficits on macrolinguistic aspects of discourse, whereas 50% of subjects showed deficits on microlinguistic aspects of discourse, indicating that macrolinguistic deficits were more prevalent for our cohort. A subset of subjects demonstrated significant macrolinguistic deficits without the presence of microlinguistic deficits. These results support previous aphasia research stating that aphasia batteries may not be sensitive enough to detect subtle discourse deficits in this population. Results also indicated a relationship between lexical retrieval (picture naming) and cohesion for the acute population, but correlations did not hold at the sub-acute time point due to subjects performing at ceiling on the naming measure. These data are supportive of the need for multilevel analysis to examine changes in discourse and show that discourse deficits may be missed using traditional aphasia batteries which detect primarily microlinguistic variables. Advisors/Committee Members: Maher, Lynn M. (advisor), Schnur, Tatiana T. (committee member), Thiessen, Amber (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Discourse; Stroke

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clark, A. (2018). Changes in Discourse Production Following Left Hemisphere Stroke. (Masters Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3140

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clark, Amanda. “Changes in Discourse Production Following Left Hemisphere Stroke.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed January 21, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3140.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clark, Amanda. “Changes in Discourse Production Following Left Hemisphere Stroke.” 2018. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Clark A. Changes in Discourse Production Following Left Hemisphere Stroke. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Houston; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3140.

Council of Science Editors:

Clark A. Changes in Discourse Production Following Left Hemisphere Stroke. [Masters Thesis]. University of Houston; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3140

3. -0442-6554. Current Practices of Speech-Language Pathologists for Those with Right Hemisphere Damage.

Degree: MA, Communication Disorders, University of Houston

This study was conducted to obtain a snapshot of current clinical practices of practicing Speech-Language Pathologists that work with people who have developed deficits associated with right hemisphere brain damage after a stroke. Currently licensed SLPs were recruited via online resources and were directed to a link containing a survey that targeted their most common tools for assessment, most common treatment approaches, the rationale behind their choices, their opinion on the adequacy of their available tools, and their confidence levels in correctly diagnosing deficits. A total of 143 SLPs responded, a response rate of approximately 11%. Results indicated that observation was the most common tool to diagnose specific deficits areas, the Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT) was the most commonly used test battery for assessment, and the most widely selected rationale behind test selection was administration time. Common treatment approaches for selected deficit areas were also obtained. The majority of SLPs indicated that they did not feel their tools for assessment were adequate but were highly confident that they were correct in their diagnoses. Small, but significant correlations existed between confidence levels and adequacy of tools as well as the type of college courses taken for RHD and the years since graduation. Advisors/Committee Members: Blake, Margaret Lehman (advisor), Thiessen, Amber (committee member), Ramos, Miguel A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Speech-language pathologists; Right hemisphere damage (RHD)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-0442-6554. (n.d.). Current Practices of Speech-Language Pathologists for Those with Right Hemisphere Damage. (Masters Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3630

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-0442-6554. “Current Practices of Speech-Language Pathologists for Those with Right Hemisphere Damage.” Masters Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed January 21, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3630.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-0442-6554. “Current Practices of Speech-Language Pathologists for Those with Right Hemisphere Damage.” Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

-0442-6554. Current Practices of Speech-Language Pathologists for Those with Right Hemisphere Damage. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Houston; [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3630.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

-0442-6554. Current Practices of Speech-Language Pathologists for Those with Right Hemisphere Damage. [Masters Thesis]. University of Houston; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3630

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
No year of publication.

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