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You searched for +publisher:"University of Houston" +contributor:("Reitz, Anne"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Houston

1. Twardowski, James Weston. MAKING AUSTRIAN: CULTURAL MEMORY, NATIONALISM, AND PERFORMING IDENTITY POLITICS IN LATE IMPERIAL VIENNA.

Degree: Theatre Program, 2016, University of Houston

Since Carl Schorske’s seminal Fin-de-Siècle Vienna, an explosion of scholarship has focused on the capital city’s years leading to the Austro-Hungarian Empire’s collapse. While the veritable Petrie dish of nationalism in the city has been commonly addressed in scholarship, the interplay between performances of cultural memory, indeed often a fabrication of shared memory, and the theatrical contributions to nationalist aims, has been largely overlooked. This thesis aims to examine the evolution of two interrelated performances: First, the development of anti-Semitism as key to shared cultural memory in the rhetoric and political rallies of opposing but predominant political leaders Karl Lueger and Georg Schönerer, and second, how this development gave rise to an increased awareness and discussion of nationalism and Zionism. It examines these veiled themes in Viennese theatrical writings and stage productions leading to the conclusion of the First World War, with special attention to the works of the two leading, and largely divergent, authors, Karl Kraus and Arthur Schnitzler. Advisors/Committee Members: Kirk, Keith B. (advisor), Reitz, Anne (committee member), Shimko, Robert B. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Austria; Vienna; Cultural Memory; Politics; Theatre; Performance; Drama; Schorske; Franz Joseph; Karl Kraus; Arthur Schnitzler; Professor Bernhardi; Karl Lueger; Georg Schonerer; Hermann Bahr; Theodor Herzl; Judaism; Anti-Semitism; Religion; Catholicism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Twardowski, J. W. (2016). MAKING AUSTRIAN: CULTURAL MEMORY, NATIONALISM, AND PERFORMING IDENTITY POLITICS IN LATE IMPERIAL VIENNA. (Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1513

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Twardowski, James Weston. “MAKING AUSTRIAN: CULTURAL MEMORY, NATIONALISM, AND PERFORMING IDENTITY POLITICS IN LATE IMPERIAL VIENNA.” 2016. Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1513.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Twardowski, James Weston. “MAKING AUSTRIAN: CULTURAL MEMORY, NATIONALISM, AND PERFORMING IDENTITY POLITICS IN LATE IMPERIAL VIENNA.” 2016. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Twardowski JW. MAKING AUSTRIAN: CULTURAL MEMORY, NATIONALISM, AND PERFORMING IDENTITY POLITICS IN LATE IMPERIAL VIENNA. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1513.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Twardowski JW. MAKING AUSTRIAN: CULTURAL MEMORY, NATIONALISM, AND PERFORMING IDENTITY POLITICS IN LATE IMPERIAL VIENNA. [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1513

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Woolbert, Elizabeth Tyrrell. The Strange and the Familiar: Shakespeare as a Point of Anglo-Germanic Cultural Exchange.

Degree: Theatre Program, 2015, University of Houston

One way of approaching an argumentative, academic essay is to conceive of two parts: a site, or subject of examination, and a lens, the context or paradigm in which the scholar examines that subject. This thesis illustrates the process by which the works of William Shakespeare have functioned as both, specifically in England and Germany over a period of two hundred years, from the late eighteenth century to the late twentieth. After a difficult initiation into the German-speaking world and heavy resistance from proponents of French Neoclassicism, Shakespeare became an indispensable part of the German literary and theatrical worlds. This was due in part to German writers’ construction of Shakespeare in terms more palatable to their countrymen, terms that grew to represent not just an aesthetic sensibility but part of the German character itself. A century later, Shakespeare was an unshakable pillar of the German canon and a favored resource for the experimental producer-director Max Reinhardt. Reinhardt’s personification of German Modernism found its fullest expression when put to use animating Shakespeare’s plays. Very shortly thereafter, agents and cooperatives of the Nazi government pressed Shakespeare into its service. The Nazis borrowed the familiarity and cultural currency of Shakespeare to legitimize their own bigotry, thus transforming Shakespeare from a site to a lens. A similar approach, though for a much less destructive purpose, is evident in the work of director Peter Brook. His career in post-WWII England, especially at the Royal Shakespeare Company, picks up on the same use of Shakespeare as a lens that is observable during the Third Reich. In Brook’s case, Shakespeare represents a familiar element that helped make palatable a strange element, Brechtian techniques, for English tastes. Overall, this thesis demonstrates how processes of familiarization and estrangement have contributed to the works of William Shakespeare’s becoming vehicles for cultural exchange between England and Germany. Advisors/Committee Members: Shimko, Robert B. (advisor), Kirk, Keith B. (committee member), Reitz, Anne (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: William Shakespeare; Bertolt Brecht; Peter Brook; Verfremdung; Estrangement; A Midsummer Night's Dream; The Royal Shakespeare Company; Theatre

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Woolbert, E. T. (2015). The Strange and the Familiar: Shakespeare as a Point of Anglo-Germanic Cultural Exchange. (Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1146

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Woolbert, Elizabeth Tyrrell. “The Strange and the Familiar: Shakespeare as a Point of Anglo-Germanic Cultural Exchange.” 2015. Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1146.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Woolbert, Elizabeth Tyrrell. “The Strange and the Familiar: Shakespeare as a Point of Anglo-Germanic Cultural Exchange.” 2015. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Woolbert ET. The Strange and the Familiar: Shakespeare as a Point of Anglo-Germanic Cultural Exchange. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2015. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1146.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Woolbert ET. The Strange and the Familiar: Shakespeare as a Point of Anglo-Germanic Cultural Exchange. [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1146

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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