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You searched for +publisher:"University of Houston" +contributor:("Monserud, Maria A."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Houston

1. -4806-0494. Likelihood of Using Mental Health Services among Asians and Latinos in the U.S.: An Acculturative Approach.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2020, University of Houston

Prior research indicates that because of acculturation, racial minorities’ use of mental health services increases with each subsequent generation. Yet little is known about how refining generational categories to include the 1.5 and 2.5 generations affects the association between acculturation and the perceived need for mental health resources. Using the National Latino and Asian American Study, the present study examined the interplay between generation status, acculturation, socioeconomic status (SES), and perceived need to seek mental health services among Asians (N = 2,095) and Latinos (N = 2,554) in the United States. The findings indicate that the interrelationships between these factors may be different for Asians and Latinos and that it is crucial to use more refined generational categories in intergenerational health mobility research. Specifically, the 1.5, 2.5 and third generations are associated with an increase in perception of needing to seek mental health resources among Asians. Furthermore, the findings highlight the importance of taking into consideration the implications of several acculturation measures on the association between generation status and the perception of mental health services. In particular, English proficiency accounts for the impact of generation status partially among Asians and completely among Latinos. Lastly, this study demonstrates that not only various acculturation measures, but also some SES factors (i.e., education and employment) might make a difference in the effect of generation status on access to mental health services. Advisors/Committee Members: Monserud, Maria A. (advisor), Anderson, Kathryn F. (committee member), Narendorf, Sarah C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Mental health; service use; acculturation; 1.5 generation; 2.5 generation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-4806-0494. (2020). Likelihood of Using Mental Health Services among Asians and Latinos in the U.S.: An Acculturative Approach. (Masters Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/6643

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Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-4806-0494. “Likelihood of Using Mental Health Services among Asians and Latinos in the U.S.: An Acculturative Approach.” 2020. Masters Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/6643.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-4806-0494. “Likelihood of Using Mental Health Services among Asians and Latinos in the U.S.: An Acculturative Approach.” 2020. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-4806-0494. Likelihood of Using Mental Health Services among Asians and Latinos in the U.S.: An Acculturative Approach. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Houston; 2020. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/6643.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-4806-0494. Likelihood of Using Mental Health Services among Asians and Latinos in the U.S.: An Acculturative Approach. [Masters Thesis]. University of Houston; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/6643

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


University of Houston

2. -1230-2765. Race Self-Labeling Choices of Multiracial Individuals.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2019, University of Houston

In 2000, the U.S. Census allowed multiracial people to select more than one race on the official U.S. Census survey for the first time in U.S. history. This resulted in a multiracial population of approximately seven million people that increased to approximately 9 million people on the 2010 U. S. Census survey (Humes et al. 2001; Jones and Symens Smith 2001; Mackun and Wilson 2011). The 32 percent increase in the multiracial population was significant in comparison to the overall U.S. population increase of only 9.7 percent in the same time frame. The growing prominence of the multiracial population in the United States is prompting new questions about the importance of social identities on race self-labeling decisions. Race is a subjective social construct with real social, political, and economic consequences (Albuja et al. 2017; Saperstein and Penner 2012; Shih and Sanchez 2009). Multiracial individuals have race labeling options available to them that single race individuals do not. I review and expand on a growing body of research on this population that focuses on identifying and describing non-racial categories important to shaping racial identities. Specifically, I utilized a national survey of U.S. adults administered by the Pew Research Center in order to investigate how social identities defined by non-racial categories such as gender, social class, and political party affiliation influence the race self-labels chosen by multiracial individuals in the United States. In addition, I take into account factors of discrimination, socialization, and racial identity importance and their potential influence on race self-labeling decisions. The findings indicate that gender, social class, and political party affiliation are potential predictors of the race self-labeling choices of multiracial individuals. After adding the factors of discrimination, socialization, and racial identity, social class and political party affiliation, but not gender, remained as significant predictors of racial self-labeling. In addition, the results for social class and political party affiliation reinforce the actuality that a pervasive racial hierarchy and social stratification system is embedded within the U.S. social class system. Assessing the labeling decisions of multiracial individuals provides insight on how non-racial categories inform the contextual nature of race and reinforce the existing social construction of race in the United States. Advisors/Committee Members: Monserud, Maria A. (advisor), Savage, Scott V. (committee member), Reilly, Colleen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Race Self-Labeling; Multiracial

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-1230-2765. (2019). Race Self-Labeling Choices of Multiracial Individuals. (Masters Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/4683

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-1230-2765. “Race Self-Labeling Choices of Multiracial Individuals.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/4683.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-1230-2765. “Race Self-Labeling Choices of Multiracial Individuals.” 2019. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-1230-2765. Race Self-Labeling Choices of Multiracial Individuals. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Houston; 2019. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/4683.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-1230-2765. Race Self-Labeling Choices of Multiracial Individuals. [Masters Thesis]. University of Houston; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/4683

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


University of Houston

3. Farago, Fanni. Shaping Student Outcomes: The Relevance of Perceived Discrimination for 2nd Generation Minority Adolescents.

Degree: MA, Sociology, University of Houston

This study investigated the relationship between different sources of discrimination (i.e., societal, institutional, and peer) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic performance, aspirations, and attitude for achievement) among second-generation immigrant high school students (N = 3,115) of several racial/ethnic groups (non-Hispanic Whites, Blacks, Latinos, Asians, and Other (e.g., Cuban, West-Indian, and Islander identities). Specifically, the impact of race/ethnicity, school climate, and family cohesion on perceived discrimination and academic outcomes was examined. Results indicated that different sources of discrimination had varying effects on academic outcomes. Unexpectedly, perceptions of peer discrimination predicted improved academic performance and greater academic aspirations. As expected, stronger perceived institutional discrimination predicted lower academic performance. Additionally, distinct racial/ethnic self-labels and aspects of school climate, along with family cohesion, uniquely interacted with academic outcomes and sources of discrimination. Notably, a Black self-label moderated the impact of societal discrimination on students’ attitude for academic achievement, while family cohesion moderated its impact on aspirations and attitude for achievement. The findings on the beneficial implications of perceived peer discrimination for academic outcomes contradict prior research. Theoretical models by Bronfenbenner and Garcia Coll and colleagues help contextualize findings for minority adolescents. Advisors/Committee Members: Monserud, Maria A. (advisor), Dworkin, Anthony Gary (committee member), Williams Jennings, Sheara (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Perceived discrimination; 2nd generation immigrants; Minorities; Adolescents; Student outcomes; Academic achievement

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Farago, F. (n.d.). Shaping Student Outcomes: The Relevance of Perceived Discrimination for 2nd Generation Minority Adolescents. (Masters Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/4073

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farago, Fanni. “Shaping Student Outcomes: The Relevance of Perceived Discrimination for 2nd Generation Minority Adolescents.” Masters Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/4073.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farago, Fanni. “Shaping Student Outcomes: The Relevance of Perceived Discrimination for 2nd Generation Minority Adolescents.” Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Farago F. Shaping Student Outcomes: The Relevance of Perceived Discrimination for 2nd Generation Minority Adolescents. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Houston; [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/4073.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Farago F. Shaping Student Outcomes: The Relevance of Perceived Discrimination for 2nd Generation Minority Adolescents. [Masters Thesis]. University of Houston; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/4073

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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