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University of Houston

1. -3768-1463. Behavioral, Cognitive, and Biochemical Consequences of Early Life Stress in Later Life: Insights from an Animal Model.

Degree: Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of, 2017, University of Houston

Adverse experiences during early life contribute to the development of psychiatric conditions in later life. In fact, young children who directly experience or witness traumatic event(s) during early life, a sensitive developmental period, are considered highly vulnerable to psychiatric disorders during adult life. Interestingly, not all children who experience traumatic events are equally at risk of developing later life psychiatric disorders. Some are resilient despite being exposed to the same risk factors, while others are susceptible. The relationship between early life trauma exposure and development of later life psychiatric symptoms is not fully understood, and the mechanistic basis for resilience is also not clear. Clinical and preclinical studies have suggested that defects in stress-adaptive mechanisms potentially contribute to etiology of later life psychiatric conditions. Preclinical data from our laboratory has indicated poor oxidative/antioxidative balance as a critical component of maladaptive stress responsiveness in rodents. Our published work has demonstrated that induction of psychological stress leads to behavioral and cognitive deficits in rats. These impairments correlate with an increase in oxidative stress markers in the periphery as well as in selected regions of the brain including the hippocampus, amygdala, and the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, heightened oxidative stress was associated with decreased levels of key antioxidant enzymes. It seems like that early life stress causes behavioral and cognitive deficits via an oxidative stress-mediated weakening of neuronal connections. The central hypothesis of this Dissertation is that the ability to acquire susceptibility or resistance to stress-induced behavioral and cognitive deficits resides in oxidative-antioxidative balance within the CNS. This balance is maintained by transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore, our long-term goal is to investigate a) the role of early life stress on behavior and cognition across different ages in rats, b) reveal resilience and susceptible phenotypes and c) to identify the role of oxidative mechanisms in the regulation of behavioral and cognitive function and resilience. We propose to utilize a comprehensive approach to address our goals. In Aim 1, the effect of induction of early life trauma was examined using a rat model of early-life stress on later life behaviors. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to single prolonged stress (SPS) at postnatal day (PND) 25. Behavior tests to assess anxiety-like behavior, depression-like behavior, and learning and memory function were performed at different stages of development during PND 32, 60 and 90. Resilience and susceptibility phenotypes also were examined. In Aim 2 we examined the effect of early life stress on oxidative stress mechanisms as well as transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of specific genes that presumably control antioxidative capacity. We focused explicitly on Keap1-Nrf2 and NF-κB pathway. SD rats were exposed to SPS at… Advisors/Committee Members: Salim, Samina (advisor), Eikenburg, Douglas (committee member), Hurd, Yasmin (committee member), Eriksen, Jason (committee member), Bawa-Khalfe, Tasneem (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: early life stress; oxidative stress; susceptibility; resilient

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APA (6th Edition):

-3768-1463. (2017). Behavioral, Cognitive, and Biochemical Consequences of Early Life Stress in Later Life: Insights from an Animal Model. (Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3641

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-3768-1463. “Behavioral, Cognitive, and Biochemical Consequences of Early Life Stress in Later Life: Insights from an Animal Model.” 2017. Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3641.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-3768-1463. “Behavioral, Cognitive, and Biochemical Consequences of Early Life Stress in Later Life: Insights from an Animal Model.” 2017. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-3768-1463. Behavioral, Cognitive, and Biochemical Consequences of Early Life Stress in Later Life: Insights from an Animal Model. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2017. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3641.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

-3768-1463. Behavioral, Cognitive, and Biochemical Consequences of Early Life Stress in Later Life: Insights from an Animal Model. [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3641

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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