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You searched for +publisher:"University of Hong Kong" +contributor:("Abernethy, AB"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Hong Kong

1. 黃偉龍.; Wong, Wai-lung. The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adultsin Hong Kong.

Degree: PhD, 2012, University of Hong Kong

In six experiments, the relationships between history of falls, reinvestment, fear of falling, perception, balance ability and walking ability of community-dwelling older adults was investigated. In addition, the Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale (MSRS) (Masters, Polman, & Hammond, 1993; Masters, Eves, & Maxwell, 2005) was further validated, using a Chinese version (MSRS-C). In the first experiment (Chapter 2), it was shown that elder fallers scored significantly higher than non-fallers on both the movement self-consciousness and the conscious motor processing components of the MSRS-C. The conscious motor processing component of the MSRS-C was found to discriminate previous faller from non-faller status. In the second experiment (Chapter 3), findings demonstrated that internal focus of attention was greater in elder repeat fallers and increased as task demands increased. However, external focus of attention increased in both elder repeat fallers and elder non-fallers as task demands increased. Elder repeat fallers scored significantly higher than elder non-fallers on the MSRS-C. In the third and fourth experiments (Chapter 4), it was revealed that elder fallers demonstrated greater fear of falling and a higher propensity for movement specific reinvestment than non-fallers. Elderly people perceived stairs as steeper than they were and judged stairs as steeper when making visual-matching and verbal-report estimates that required conscious involvement compared to haptic estimates that are thought to require little conscious involvement. Overestimations when making explicit, conscious judgments were reduced by carrying out a concurrent secondary task during estimation, but there was little effect of the secondary task on implicit, non-conscious judgments of steepness. In Chapter 5, focus group work was conducted to investigate whether (1) elderly people respond differently when asked to complete the MSRS-C in respect of contexts that are not directly related to balance or locomotion and (2) elderly people are better able to differentiate a 4-point Likert response format when completing the MSRS-C than the original 6-point format. Experiment five (Chapter 6) further validated the MSRS-C based on the findings from Chapter 5. Results revealed that both the MSRS-C (general) and MSRS-C (walking) can be used with a six-point or a four-point response format to differentiate elderly Chinese fallers from non-fallers. The overall findings were discussed in the context of theories of motor learning and reinvestment. Implications for rehabilitation training were elucidated.

published_or_final_version

Human Performance

Doctoral

Doctor of Philosophy

Advisors/Committee Members: Masters, RSW, Abernethy, AB.

Subjects/Keywords: Falls (Accidents) in old age - China - Hong Kong - Prevention.; Older people with disabilities - Rehabilitation - China - Hong Kong.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

黃偉龍.; Wong, W. (2012). The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adultsin Hong Kong. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Hong Kong. Retrieved from Wong, W. [黃偉龍]. (2012). The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adults in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852176 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852176 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/179985

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

黃偉龍.; Wong, Wai-lung. “The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adultsin Hong Kong.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Hong Kong. Accessed December 08, 2019. Wong, W. [黃偉龍]. (2012). The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adults in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852176 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852176 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/179985.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

黃偉龍.; Wong, Wai-lung. “The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adultsin Hong Kong.” 2012. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

黃偉龍.; Wong W. The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adultsin Hong Kong. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Hong Kong; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: Wong, W. [黃偉龍]. (2012). The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adults in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852176 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852176 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/179985.

Council of Science Editors:

黃偉龍.; Wong W. The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adultsin Hong Kong. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Hong Kong; 2012. Available from: Wong, W. [黃偉龍]. (2012). The role of movement specific reinvestment, fall efficacy and perception in walking and falling in community-dwelling older adults in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852176 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852176 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/179985


University of Hong Kong

2. Capio, Catherine Mamaid. The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy.

Degree: PhD, 2012, University of Hong Kong

Previous research has shown that fundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency influences physical activity (PA) in children, such that those who are more proficient tend to be more active. Sufficient PA engagement in childhood has been associated with positive health outcomes, but little is known about PA levels in children with disabilities. Children with cerebral palsy (CP) represent the largest diagnostic group in pediatric rehabilitation. In one systematic review and six studies, FMS proficiency and PA levels among children with CP were measured, analyzed, and compared with typically developing children. The lack of a valid objective PA measurement method for children with CP was determined in the systematic review, and the first study (Chapter 2) validated the Actigraph accelerometer as a valid objective PA measurement instrument in this population group. FMS measurement in children with CP was addressed in the second study (Chapter 3), which showed that process-and product-oriented measurement are both important in characterizing FMS proficiency in a holistic manner. With the said measurement techniques validated, the third study (Chapter 4) utilized a cross- sectional study design to examine FMS proficiency and PA in children with and without CP. It was found that children were less active and more sedentary during weekends than weekdays. FMS proficiency was negatively associated with sedentary time and positively associated with time spent in moderate to vigorous PA in both groups of children. Process-oriented FMS measures were found to have a stronger influence on PA in children with CP than in typically developing children. With the intention to examine these relationships in a cause-effect study design, a theoretical model for FMS training programs was tested in children with and without disabilities in the fourth and fifth studies (Chapter 5). A movement training approach that minimized the amount of practice errors was found to facilitate improvements in FMS proficiency. This approach was then utilized in the sixth study (Chapter 6), wherein the relationship of FMS proficiency and PA were examined in a quasi-experimental design. It was found that by training FMS, weekend PA was heightened and weekend sedentary time was decreased among children with CP. In comparison, typically developing children manifested decreased weekend sedentary time after FMS training. The findings from these studies contribute to understanding the measurement of FMS and PA in children with CP, the implementation of FMS training in children in general, and the relationship between FMS and PA in children with and without disabilities.

published_or_final_version

Human Performance

Doctoral

Doctor of Philosophy

Advisors/Committee Members: Abernethy, AB, Sit, HP, Masters, RSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Motor ability in children.; Exercise for children.; Physical fitness for children.; Cerebral palsied children.

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Capio, C. M. (2012). The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Hong Kong. Retrieved from Capio, C. M.. (2012). The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4961761 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4961761 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/180941

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Capio, Catherine Mamaid. “The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Hong Kong. Accessed December 08, 2019. Capio, C. M.. (2012). The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4961761 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4961761 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/180941.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Capio, Catherine Mamaid. “The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy.” 2012. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Capio CM. The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Hong Kong; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: Capio, C. M.. (2012). The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4961761 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4961761 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/180941.

Council of Science Editors:

Capio CM. The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Hong Kong; 2012. Available from: Capio, C. M.. (2012). The relationship between fundamental movement skills and physical activity in children with and without cerebral palsy. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4961761 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4961761 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/180941

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