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You searched for +publisher:"University of Ghana" +contributor:("Ahiadeke, C"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Ghana

1. Adamba, C. Socioeconomic Inequalities and Maternal Health Outcomes in Ghana .

Degree: 2013, University of Ghana

Maternal health outcomes are among the most diverse human indicators of development as well as critical global indicators of socioeconomic standing of a country. While many studies have over the years identified risk factors associated with the occurrence of adverse maternal health outcomes, such studies have tended to be relatively proximal and individually-based. Using the Ghana Maternal Health Survey data in a multilevel modelling design, this study examined the relationship between the socioeconomic status of the area within which women live and the occurrence of maternal mortality, stillbirth, miscarriage and abortion as prime indicators of maternal health. The aim is to understand how, independent of individual level factors, maternal health is affected by the characteristics of the areas within which women live and work. The study used the 2000 Population and Housing Census data to construct a composite index of multiple deprivation to reflect the socioeconomic structure of women’s immediate environment. The quantitative analysis was triangulated with qualitative interviews to contextualise the discussions. The results showed that women living in deprived areas have higher odds of maternal death compared to women living in less deprived areas. The level of deprivation further suppresses the expected positive effect of educational attainment measured at the individual level, indicating that individual level educational qualification is not protective of maternal mortality in a deprived area. The effect of the deprivation status however reduces in areas where the aggregate proportion of females educated up to Senior High School level or higher s high. This means that policies that will provide and ensure educational attainment up to the Senior High School level for women will be crucial in reducing the risk of maternal mortality. The incidence rate of maternal mortality is also lower in neighbourhoods where coverage of supervised deliveries is higher. Women who live in less deprived neighbourhoods however have a higher likelihood of seeking abortion compared with women in deprived neighbourhoods. Less deprived neighbourhoods are also associated with high odds of suffering miscarriage but lower odds of stillbirth. Controlling for a variety of individual characteristics the results further showed that it is women of middle or wealthy households living in less deprived neighbourhoods who are mostly likely to seek abortion, whilst women of poor households living in less deprived neighbourhood have higher probabilities of reporting miscarriages. These results setup two important agendas that concern development policy and research. The resulting policy recommendation from the work is that, an expansion of educational opportunities that enable more women to obtain school education up to the Senior High School level and higher will be significant in reducing maternal mortality in Ghana. In terms of research agenda, the findings strengthen the need to broaden the scope of maternal health… Advisors/Committee Members: Osei-Akoto, I (advisor), Owusu, A.Y (advisor), Ahiadeke, C (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Maternal Health; Socioeconomic; Mortality; Inequalities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Adamba, C. (2013). Socioeconomic Inequalities and Maternal Health Outcomes in Ghana . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Ghana. Retrieved from http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/5178

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Adamba, C. “Socioeconomic Inequalities and Maternal Health Outcomes in Ghana .” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Ghana. Accessed March 02, 2021. http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/5178.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Adamba, C. “Socioeconomic Inequalities and Maternal Health Outcomes in Ghana .” 2013. Web. 02 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Adamba C. Socioeconomic Inequalities and Maternal Health Outcomes in Ghana . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Ghana; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 02]. Available from: http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/5178.

Council of Science Editors:

Adamba C. Socioeconomic Inequalities and Maternal Health Outcomes in Ghana . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Ghana; 2013. Available from: http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/5178


University of Ghana

2. Asamoah, J. Causes of Teenage Pregnancy in Senya Bereku Community of Awutu- Efutu- Senya District .

Degree: 2005, University of Ghana

The main objective of the study was to investigate intofactors contributing to teenage pregnancy in the Senya- Bereku community of the Awutu-Effutu-Senya District, which has a high dropout rate of girls in the educational facilities make recommendations to the District Health Management Team and District Assembly of Awutu-Effutu-Senya District. The dissertation is based on data collected from the field between June 2004 and June 2005. Data on 200 adolescents of which 82 was male, 10 teenage mothers, 5 mothers of adolescent mothers and ten opinion leaders. Distribution of respondents was presented in tables, pie charts, bar charts and cross tabulations. The chi-square test was used to establish the association between independent variables stated in the hypothesis and teenage pregnancy. The finding of the study showed that coercion, career aspirations, parental control, knowledge and usage of contraceptives and involvement in extracurricular activities were significantly related to adolescent sexuality. The median age of sexual debut was 16 years for males and females, and there was poor usage of conventional family planning methods despite education on teenage pregnancy and HIV/AIDS. Programmes to help reduce the incidence of teenage pregnancy will need the combined efforts of all stakeholders. Health services and counselling centres should be established for the youth with emphasis on reproductive behaviour and sexuality. Early onset of education on teenage pregnancy and contraceptives are recommended for the youth in the early teenage years prior to the median age of sexual debut. Channeling of sexual energy into asexual activity such as athletics and clubs will be helpful for the youth. Teenage mothers can be helped and supported by the community to continue their education. Advisors/Committee Members: Ahiadeke, C (advisor), Asante, F (advisor).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Asamoah, J. (2005). Causes of Teenage Pregnancy in Senya Bereku Community of Awutu- Efutu- Senya District . (Masters Thesis). University of Ghana. Retrieved from http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/6345

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Asamoah, J. “Causes of Teenage Pregnancy in Senya Bereku Community of Awutu- Efutu- Senya District .” 2005. Masters Thesis, University of Ghana. Accessed March 02, 2021. http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/6345.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Asamoah, J. “Causes of Teenage Pregnancy in Senya Bereku Community of Awutu- Efutu- Senya District .” 2005. Web. 02 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Asamoah J. Causes of Teenage Pregnancy in Senya Bereku Community of Awutu- Efutu- Senya District . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Ghana; 2005. [cited 2021 Mar 02]. Available from: http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/6345.

Council of Science Editors:

Asamoah J. Causes of Teenage Pregnancy in Senya Bereku Community of Awutu- Efutu- Senya District . [Masters Thesis]. University of Ghana; 2005. Available from: http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/6345


University of Ghana

3. Ghartey, E. Community Perceptions on Induced Abortions and Contraceptives in the Manhyia and Asawase Sub Metros of Kumasi .

Degree: 2008, University of Ghana

Improving maternal health is a key concern of the international community due to the unacceptably high maternal mortality rate. Invariably several studies have identified induced unsafe abortions as a major contributory factor to these maternal deaths. Contraceptive use, a cheap and effective preventive method of unplanned pregnancies is rather low. Ghana and for that matter Kumasi is no exception to the rule of high incidence of induced abortions and its attendant public health problems. This cross-sectional study combines both qualitative and quantitative methods to explore the community’s perceptions of induced abortions and contraceptives in the Manhyia and Asawase sub metros of Kumasi. The members of the reproductive age group for women and men 15 to 49 and 15 to 59 respectively were, identified as the main respondents. Methods of data collection included interviews with semi-structured questionnaires, focus group discussion, and in-depth interview of opinion leaders and health workers in the community. The results indicate a widespread knowledge of the complications associated with induced abortions in the communities. For e.g., 261 (65.5%) of respondents stated rightly three conditions that may arise from terminating a pregnancy. Recourse to induced abortions was nonetheless widespread and cuts across social and religious classes. There is high level of male involvement and participation in abortion related-decision making There was a high level of knowledge of both the traditional and modern methods of contraceptives among both sexes. Three hundred and eighty nine respondents representing 97.25% of the total respondents knew at least one method of contraceptive. This knowledge however, has been overshadowed by a general, perceived fear of health effects associated with contraceptive use and a belief of ―not being at risk of pregnancy‖. In view of these, practice of contraception especially the modern methods among the communities is poor resulting in a relatively high unmet need for family planning Interventions must be prompt and in collaboration with the media, must focus on these three: The physical and socio-economic complications of induced abortions Disabuse the minds of the community of the beliefs and misconceptions about contraceptives through vigorous mass education Make contraceptives attractive by highlighting its enormous contraceptive and other non contraceptive benefits. It is believed that the views from different members of the community have provided insight into the context of unwanted pregnancies, induced abortions and knowledge of contraceptive. It again expected that the information gathered will serve as a guideline in the formulation of effective, practical, preventive policies and programmes for reducing induced abortions and its effects in the Kumasi metropolis as well as the nation. Advisors/Committee Members: Ahiadeke, C (advisor), Asante, R.O (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Community; Induced Abortions; Manhyia; Kumasi

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ghartey, E. (2008). Community Perceptions on Induced Abortions and Contraceptives in the Manhyia and Asawase Sub Metros of Kumasi . (Masters Thesis). University of Ghana. Retrieved from http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/8776

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ghartey, E. “Community Perceptions on Induced Abortions and Contraceptives in the Manhyia and Asawase Sub Metros of Kumasi .” 2008. Masters Thesis, University of Ghana. Accessed March 02, 2021. http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/8776.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ghartey, E. “Community Perceptions on Induced Abortions and Contraceptives in the Manhyia and Asawase Sub Metros of Kumasi .” 2008. Web. 02 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ghartey E. Community Perceptions on Induced Abortions and Contraceptives in the Manhyia and Asawase Sub Metros of Kumasi . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Ghana; 2008. [cited 2021 Mar 02]. Available from: http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/8776.

Council of Science Editors:

Ghartey E. Community Perceptions on Induced Abortions and Contraceptives in the Manhyia and Asawase Sub Metros of Kumasi . [Masters Thesis]. University of Ghana; 2008. Available from: http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/8776

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