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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("William Kerr"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Corey, Mark. Developing functional food products through novel processing, ingredient, and shelf stability evaluation.

Degree: PhD, Food Science, 2009, University of Georgia

The purposes of this dissertation research were: 1) to develop new functional food products for consumers, 2) to evaluate processing or storage stability, antioxidant activity, and health properties of polyphenolic compounds in functional products, and 3) to determine the effects of processing from emerging technologies on properties of functional products. Novel functional food products were developed, which included a beverage made from fruit juice and high-procyanidin sorghum bran for the metabolic syndrome or diabetic markets, and model green tea (GT)-fortified apple products designated for low- and intermediate-moisture food systems. The stability of phytochemicals and antioxidant activity was evaluated in GT-fortified apple product over storage in low- and intermediate-moisture systems. Phytochemical degradation was modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetic model (ln C = A∙e-kt). GT catechins including catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), and epicatechin gallate (ECG) showed varying levels of stability with k = 0 to 0.070, indicating degradation over storage. Analysis of water mobility by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) supported analytical determinations that increasing moisture content related to increases in magnitude of k. The onset glass transition temperature (Tgo) of GT-fortified apple products decreased from 13°C to -34°C from aw 0.11-0.56, respectively. Low-field 1H NMR analysis of GT-fortified apple products conducted by free induction decay (FID) showed increasing relaxation times from 60 to 1,000 µs from aw 0.11-0.75, respectively. Antioxidant activity determinations including total polyphenolic content by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)hydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging activity, and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay conducted on extracts from high-procyandin sorghum beverage and GT-fortified apple products demonstrated value-added potential of functional ingredient incorporation to products. As an in vitro marker for diabetic systems, extracts from high-procyanidin sorghum beverage and GT-fortified apple products showed efficacy in inhibiting glycation of bovine serum albumin. High-pressure throttling was investigated as an emerging technology used for the processing of functional beverages. Apple juice inoculated with Zygosaccharomyces bailii, common spoilage yeast in fruit juices, processed by high-pressure throttling was found to have 7-log reductions in vegetative cells from processing of juice. Advisors/Committee Members: William Kerr.

Subjects/Keywords: Functional foods; High pressure processing; Zygosaccharomyces bailii; Glycation; Sorghum; Procyanidin; High-procyanidin sorghum bran; Green tea; Apple; Polyphenolic compounds; Low moisture foods; Intermediate moisture foods; NMR; DSC; Water activity

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APA (6th Edition):

Corey, M. (2009). Developing functional food products through novel processing, ingredient, and shelf stability evaluation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/corey_mark_e_200908_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Corey, Mark. “Developing functional food products through novel processing, ingredient, and shelf stability evaluation.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/corey_mark_e_200908_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Corey, Mark. “Developing functional food products through novel processing, ingredient, and shelf stability evaluation.” 2009. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Corey M. Developing functional food products through novel processing, ingredient, and shelf stability evaluation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/corey_mark_e_200908_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Corey M. Developing functional food products through novel processing, ingredient, and shelf stability evaluation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2009. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/corey_mark_e_200908_phd


University of Georgia

2. Chi, Po-An. Development of broccoli powder using vacuum belt drying.

Degree: MS, Food Science, 2018, University of Georgia

The study determined if high quality broccoli powder could be produced by vacuum drying. The effect of temperature, maltodextrin and pretreatment on drying kinetics, physical characteristics of the powder and nutritional quality were studied. The Wang and Singh model best fit drying rate data. Powders exhibited a Type III isotherm and were best fit by the GAB model. With 10% maltodextrin, drying efficiency was 200% higher and hygroscopicity was lower than samples without maltodextrin. Blanching with 0.1% (w/v) NaHCO3 and 0.1% (w/v) MgO resulted in greener samples with more vitamin C. Vitamin C content was two-fold greater in powders produced by vacuum drying and freeze drying than in hot-air drying. Steam blanching preserved 12.5% more of the endogenous antioxidants than that by boiling with NaHCO3 and MgO. Hot-air drying reduced the total antioxidant content by 31.5% in comparison with vacuum drying. Freeze drying resulted in the lowest sulforaphane content. Advisors/Committee Members: William Kerr.

Subjects/Keywords: Broccoli; Vacuum belt drying; Drying model; Vitamin C; Sulforaphane

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chi, P. (2018). Development of broccoli powder using vacuum belt drying. (Masters Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38136

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chi, Po-An. “Development of broccoli powder using vacuum belt drying.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38136.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chi, Po-An. “Development of broccoli powder using vacuum belt drying.” 2018. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Chi P. Development of broccoli powder using vacuum belt drying. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Georgia; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38136.

Council of Science Editors:

Chi P. Development of broccoli powder using vacuum belt drying. [Masters Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38136


University of Georgia

3. Rincon, Angela Maria. Effect of prefreezing treatments on quality of mango (Manguifera indica L.) during frozen storage.

Degree: MS, Food Science, 2004, University of Georgia

At the moment there is a high demand for high-quality fruit ingredients to be used in many food formulations such as pastry and confectionery products, ice cream, frozen desserts and sweets, fruit salads, cheese and yoghurt. The overall objective was to improve quality of frozen mango using two types of food cryoprotection: one was the reduction of water content of the fruit (osmotic dehydration) and the other was the formulation of mango pulp with carbohydrates of different molecular weight to increase frozen stability. Osmotic dehydration was able to modify quality parameters of slices before and after frozen storage. Values for some **parameters such as vitamin C, lightness (L), chroma (C), and firmness for non osmotically dehydrated slices were significantly higher than osmotically dehydrated slices. However, treatments carried out with osmotic solutions (especially those with high concentrations of sucrose) improved significantly the quality of mango slices after frozen storage. Higher moisture losses and solid gain values were reported for slices from the highest osmotic solution oconcentration. Thus, slices dipped in 30Brix were better protected against freezing damage. Effects of sucrose concentration on the slices and ripening stage on frozen-thawed mango flavor perception were determined. Six flavor descriptors (color, flavor, sweetness, sourness, firmness and juiciness) were evaluated by a sensory trained panel. All descriptors were affected by sugar content and ripening stage. To study the effect of mango fruit composition on frozen stability, five pulp samples were prepared and evaluated in terms of glass transition temperature modification and its influence on ascorbic acid retention. State diagrams and sorption isotherms were determined in order to predict freezing storage conditions for the pulps. Glass transition temperature was found to be a function on the composition of the mixture of carbohydrates present on the pulps. As the molecular weight of carbohydrates used for the pulps formulation increased, so did T’g. Maltodextrin M150, which had the highest T’g value, had the highest protective effect on ascorbic acid degradation. However, knowledge of T’g alone was not sufficient to know whether a cryoprotectant is a good cryostabilizer or not. Sensory and textural analysis were recommended in addition to evaluate cryoprotectan effects during frozen storage. Advisors/Committee Members: William Kerr.

Subjects/Keywords: Osmotic Dehydration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rincon, A. M. (2004). Effect of prefreezing treatments on quality of mango (Manguifera indica L.) during frozen storage. (Masters Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rincon_angela_m_200412_ms

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rincon, Angela Maria. “Effect of prefreezing treatments on quality of mango (Manguifera indica L.) during frozen storage.” 2004. Masters Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rincon_angela_m_200412_ms.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rincon, Angela Maria. “Effect of prefreezing treatments on quality of mango (Manguifera indica L.) during frozen storage.” 2004. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Rincon AM. Effect of prefreezing treatments on quality of mango (Manguifera indica L.) during frozen storage. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Georgia; 2004. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rincon_angela_m_200412_ms.

Council of Science Editors:

Rincon AM. Effect of prefreezing treatments on quality of mango (Manguifera indica L.) during frozen storage. [Masters Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2004. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rincon_angela_m_200412_ms

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