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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Sophia Anong"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Chalise, Lekhnath. Extensive and intensive margins of health insurance demand.

Degree: PhD, Consumer Economics, 2016, University of Georgia

This study examined the associations between health, healthcare utilization, financial worry, and behavioral risk factors, and the extensive and the intensive margins of health insurance demand within the framework of Andersen’s behavioral model of healthcare utilization and Prospect Theory. The extensive margin refers to the decision to enroll in health insurance, the intensive margin is the perceived quality of health insurance coverage, and healthcare utilization is the number of visits to a physician annually. The study used the 2013 National Health Interview Survey data and generalized path analysis. There was no direct association between current health status and the extensive margin, and none found between health changes from the previous year and the extensive margin. Healthcare utilization, financial worry, and behavioral risk factors directly and indirectly influenced the extensive margin. Those who visited physicians more often were more likely to have health insurance, while those less worried about finances were more likely to have insurance. Those who smoked more were also less likely to have health insurance. The indirect influence of the number of physician visits, financial worry, smoking, drinking, and physical activity on health insurance was mediated through health status and health status change. There was no direct association between health status and healthcare utilization with the intensive margin. However, a direct association between the margin with health status change and with financial worry was established; those who were in better health than in the previous year had a higher probability of having better health insurance coverage compare to a year ago. Those who were more worried about their finances had a lower probability of having better health insurance coverage than in the previous year. Demographic controls included age, education, gender, race, marital status, and income, as well as functional limitations and the Biomass Index. Advisors/Committee Members: Sophia Anong.

Subjects/Keywords: Advantageous selection

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chalise, L. (2016). Extensive and intensive margins of health insurance demand. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/chalise_lekhnath_201608_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chalise, Lekhnath. “Extensive and intensive margins of health insurance demand.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/chalise_lekhnath_201608_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chalise, Lekhnath. “Extensive and intensive margins of health insurance demand.” 2016. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Chalise L. Extensive and intensive margins of health insurance demand. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/chalise_lekhnath_201608_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Chalise L. Extensive and intensive margins of health insurance demand. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2016. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/chalise_lekhnath_201608_phd


University of Georgia

2. Zhao, Haidong. The effect of financial incentives on NFC mobile payment adoption.

Degree: PhD, Housing and Consumer Economics, 2017, University of Georgia

The objective of this research was to provide a better understanding of the effects of financial incentives in adopting NFC mobile payment within the framework of the Diffusion of Innovation Theory. More specifically, this study examines 1) whether the availability, type, amount, and promotion period of financial incentives increase consumers’ trust in adopting NFC mobile payment; 2) whether the availability, type, amount, and promotion period of financial incentives decrease consumers’ perceived risk in adopting NFC mobile payment; 3) whether the availability, type, amount, and promotion period of financial incentives increase consumers’ intention to adopt NFC mobile payment; and 4) whether different financial incentives influence consumers’ continuance intention to use NFC mobile payment when incentives have expired. Four general hypotheses and 11 specific hypotheses were tested in structural equation models using experimental survey data collected from 463 U.S. adults aged between 18 and 35. The findings showed that the availability of financial incentives had a significant impact on NFC mobile payment adoption. Specifically, consumers with financial incentives had a higher level of trust and intention, and a lower level of perceived risk in adopting NFC mobile payment compared to consumers who were not offered financial incentives. However, no significant differences were found between cash back and discount rewards, 5% versus 10% rewards, and 1-month and 3-month reward periods. The results of this study provide service providers and researchers a better understanding of the impact of financial incentives on NFC mobile payment adoption and also give insight to providers in the mobile payment systems channel as well as retailers offering this payment option. Advisors/Committee Members: Sophia Anong.

Subjects/Keywords: Financial incentives; NFC mobile payment; Trust; Perceived risk; Intention; Continuance intention; Diffusion of Innovation Theory

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhao, H. (2017). The effect of financial incentives on NFC mobile payment adoption. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38250

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhao, Haidong. “The effect of financial incentives on NFC mobile payment adoption.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38250.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhao, Haidong. “The effect of financial incentives on NFC mobile payment adoption.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Zhao H. The effect of financial incentives on NFC mobile payment adoption. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38250.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhao H. The effect of financial incentives on NFC mobile payment adoption. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38250

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