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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Ronald Cervero"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Burnette, Diane Montgomery. Mission critical: the strategic role of continuing higher education in advancing the traditional mission of public historically black colleges and universities.

Degree: PhD, Adult Education, 2008, University of Georgia

The purpose of this study was to understand the strategic role of the continuing higher education initiative in advancing the traditional mission of public historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). The study was guided by the following research questions: (1) What are the social and political interests that influence continuing higher education in public HBCUs? and (2) How are the social and political interests negotiated by the continuing higher education organizational unit? This qualitative study was conducted during the spring and summer 2007 semesters at seven public HBCUs. There were a total of twelve participants in the study, three senior academic officials and nine continuing higher education program directors. Data collection methods included topical interviews, the analysis of primary and secondary documents, and field notes collected through observations. The definition of the underserved as related to the traditional mission of public HBCUs has been redefined beyond race to include students who are displaced due to time and place barriers. These students are typically working professionals, adults, and nontraditional students. The study found that within the context of a post-Brown school desegregation mission, continuing higher education becomes one strategy by which public HBCUs reach out to a new population of nontraditional, adult students. Continuing higher education also promotes a more racially diverse environment at public HBCUs by attracting non-minority students. Finally, the study found that continuing higher education supports statewide economic development initiatives and creates political gain for public HBCUs. Thus continuing higher education is central to promoting a new mission focused on the assimilation of public HBCUs into the higher education mainstream. However, the assimilationist strategies promoted by continuing higher education is perceived as a threat to the cultural and ideological identity of the public Black college. The conclusions of the study were: (1) continuing higher education facilitates the advancement of a post-Brown mission for public HBCUs; (2) continuing higher education is at the nexus of social and political conflicts affecting public HBCUs; and (3) continuing higher education leaders use strategies to negotiate the conflicts between the old and new mission that are consistent with their marginal status within the institution. KEYWORDS: Adult education, Adult students, Continuing higher education, Higher education, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Nontraditional student Advisors/Committee Members: Ronald Cervero.

Subjects/Keywords: Adult education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burnette, D. M. (2008). Mission critical: the strategic role of continuing higher education in advancing the traditional mission of public historically black colleges and universities. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/burnette_diane_m_200805_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burnette, Diane Montgomery. “Mission critical: the strategic role of continuing higher education in advancing the traditional mission of public historically black colleges and universities.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed April 24, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/burnette_diane_m_200805_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burnette, Diane Montgomery. “Mission critical: the strategic role of continuing higher education in advancing the traditional mission of public historically black colleges and universities.” 2008. Web. 24 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Burnette DM. Mission critical: the strategic role of continuing higher education in advancing the traditional mission of public historically black colleges and universities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2008. [cited 2019 Apr 24]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/burnette_diane_m_200805_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Burnette DM. Mission critical: the strategic role of continuing higher education in advancing the traditional mission of public historically black colleges and universities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2008. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/burnette_diane_m_200805_phd


University of Georgia

2. Robertson, Mary Kathryn. Building program theory for evaluation: the process through a political lens.

Degree: PhD, Adult Education, 2004, University of Georgia

HRD professionals have an ethical and pragmatic obligation to evaluate training programs (Russ-Eft & Preskill, 2001). However, outcome focused evaluation models have dominated the organizational literature. Theory-driven evaluation has been suggested as an alternative. Theory-driven evaluation uses a program theory to make “explicit the underlying assumptions about how programs are expected to work…and then using this theory to guide the evaluation” (Rodgers, Petrosino, Huebner, & Hacsi, 2000). However, the program theory building process has not been explored. The purpose of this research was to explore the ways that multiple stakeholders’ interests are represented in the program theory building process when conducting a theory-driven evaluation. Three research questions guided this study: 1) what are the program theories of stakeholders?, 2) what similarities exist among the stakeholders’ program theories?, and 3) what aspects of the program theories are unique to each stakeholder? A case study methodology was used, focusing on a new employee orientation program at a 196 bed hospital. Findings included a description of the orientation program and a program theory for each of the nine stakeholders interviewed. The program theories were compared for similarities and differences. This study had three major conclusions: 1) similarities exist between stakeholders program theories, 2) individual stakeholders also have differing, and conflicting, components of their program theories, with many of the differences accounted for by the role of the stakeholder within the organization, and 3) in developing a program theory for evaluation, a broad range of outcomes and processes were specified by program stakeholders. The major assumption in the theory-driven evaluation literature is that there is a single program theory underlying a program. This research confirmed that there is some agreement among stakeholders, but also showed that stakeholders have unique understandings about how and why programs function. Finally, the research showed many of the outcomes and processes identified as important by stakeholders would not be included in an outcome focused evaluation. Recommendations for practice included the need for evaluators to negotiate a single program theory from stakeholders’ multiple theories, the role of the evaluator, and when to use theory-driven evaluation. Advisors/Committee Members: Ronald Cervero.

Subjects/Keywords: evaluation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Robertson, M. K. (2004). Building program theory for evaluation: the process through a political lens. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/robertson_mary_k_200405_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Robertson, Mary Kathryn. “Building program theory for evaluation: the process through a political lens.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed April 24, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/robertson_mary_k_200405_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Robertson, Mary Kathryn. “Building program theory for evaluation: the process through a political lens.” 2004. Web. 24 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Robertson MK. Building program theory for evaluation: the process through a political lens. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2004. [cited 2019 Apr 24]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/robertson_mary_k_200405_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Robertson MK. Building program theory for evaluation: the process through a political lens. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2004. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/robertson_mary_k_200405_phd

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