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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Richard L. Vining"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Rivkin, Daniel. Distilling judicial ideology.

Degree: MA, Political Science, 2011, University of Georgia

A judge's ideology is her set of ideas and principles and her view of how society should work, how power should be allocated, and to what ends it should be used. One way to measure judicial ideology is to find an indicator of a jurist’s preferences and isolate it from as many constraining factors as possible. Supreme Court justices are the least constrained of all jurists, particularly when writing non-majority opinions, and the citations they include in them provide a convenient unit of measurement. By determining the ideological polarity of each citation in a non-majority opinion in a concrete set of cases, I produce ideology scores for their authors within the legal fields to which those cases relate. I then compare these estimates with the justices’ Segal-Cover scores and median Martin-Quinn scores for that same period to determine their relative accuracy and usefulness in forecasting. Advisors/Committee Members: Richard L. Vining.

Subjects/Keywords: Supreme Court Justices; Non-majority opinions; Ideology; Citation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rivkin, D. (2011). Distilling judicial ideology. (Masters Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rivkin_daniel_201108_ma

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rivkin, Daniel. “Distilling judicial ideology.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed July 07, 2020. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rivkin_daniel_201108_ma.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rivkin, Daniel. “Distilling judicial ideology.” 2011. Web. 07 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Rivkin D. Distilling judicial ideology. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Georgia; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 07]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rivkin_daniel_201108_ma.

Council of Science Editors:

Rivkin D. Distilling judicial ideology. [Masters Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2011. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rivkin_daniel_201108_ma

2. Hughes, David Alan. An information-based theory of judicial accountability and social welfare.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2016, University of Georgia

While public law considers the utility of judicial elections, theoretical scholarship has lacked a rigorous positive theoretical assessment of judicial elections on voter welfare. I specify a game-theoretic model of social welfare amidst judicial review and assess voters’ well-being with and without judicial elections. I propose that reduced transparency in the political environment might alleviate many problems associated with judicial elections, particularly pandering behavior, while affording citizens the opportunity of civic engagement. The theoretical results suggest voters can be made best off under non-transparent elected institutions for large classes of political environments. Analyzing voters and judges’ decision-making in all 50 states from 2001–2010, I find that the “real world” players in my game behave as anticipated in response to a fluid environment of information Advisors/Committee Members: Richard L. Vining.

Subjects/Keywords: Law and Courts

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hughes, D. A. (2016). An information-based theory of judicial accountability and social welfare. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hughes_david_a_201605_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hughes, David Alan. “An information-based theory of judicial accountability and social welfare.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed July 07, 2020. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hughes_david_a_201605_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hughes, David Alan. “An information-based theory of judicial accountability and social welfare.” 2016. Web. 07 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Hughes DA. An information-based theory of judicial accountability and social welfare. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2016. [cited 2020 Jul 07]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hughes_david_a_201605_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Hughes DA. An information-based theory of judicial accountability and social welfare. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2016. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hughes_david_a_201605_phd

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