Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Lynn A. Bryan"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Georgia

1. Kang, Nam-Hwa. Preservice secondary science teachers' habitus and beliefs about teaching and student motivation.

Degree: PhD, Elementary Education, 2002, University of Georgia

The purpose of the study is to examine preservice science teachers’ beliefs about teaching and student motivation and their development of teaching habitus throughout their student teaching programs. The research questions are concerned (a) preservice teachers’ teaching goals and their meanings of student motivation, (b) their beliefs about the relationship between student motivation and their roles as teachers, (c) the development of participants' habitus in motivating students during their teaching practices, and (d) their habitus in learning to teach. I employed a naturalistic inquiry method with three preservice teachers' student teaching cases. Based on the data from interviews, classroom observation, and documents, the study explicates the differences among the three participants' beliefs and habitus. The findings indicate that the participants initially had transmissionist beliefs about teaching and learning; their meanings of student motivation included student goals, caring relationships, and paying attention. Although participants demonstrated some dispositions of habitus that could have helped them change their traditional beliefs, their lack of curriculum knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and their uncritical nature of habitus in learning to teach hindered them from reflecting on their teaching practices and developing pedagogically sound beliefs about teaching and student motivation. As a result, participants' student teaching experiences reinforced their naive beliefs and developed a habitus that was reproductive of the current culture of science teaching. The implications of the findings include that teacher education programs should (a) provide opportunities to obtain curriculum knowledge with critical views, (b) provide opportunities to obtain pedagogical content knowledge that connects the teacher role with student motivation, (c) provide opportunities to critically reflect on their existing habitus and beliefs in relation to the culture of schooling and the society, and (d) make the reflection process salient during student teaching and provide an iterative process of reflection and practice. The areas for further research include the long-term development of habitus, sources of consistency and changes in beliefs and habitus during student teaching, the development of preservice teachers from different backgrounds with different habitus, and the identification of the variety of habitus that preservice teachers bring into their experience of learning to teach. Advisors/Committee Members: Lynn A. Bryan.

Subjects/Keywords: Preservice teachers

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kang, N. (2002). Preservice secondary science teachers' habitus and beliefs about teaching and student motivation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kang_nam_h_200208_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kang, Nam-Hwa. “Preservice secondary science teachers' habitus and beliefs about teaching and student motivation.” 2002. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kang_nam_h_200208_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kang, Nam-Hwa. “Preservice secondary science teachers' habitus and beliefs about teaching and student motivation.” 2002. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kang N. Preservice secondary science teachers' habitus and beliefs about teaching and student motivation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2002. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kang_nam_h_200208_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Kang N. Preservice secondary science teachers' habitus and beliefs about teaching and student motivation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2002. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kang_nam_h_200208_phd


University of Georgia

2. Foster, Rachel Elizabeth. First-year secondary science teachers’ beliefs about labs: investigating connections between espoused beliefs and classroom actions.

Degree: PhD, Science Education, 2004, University of Georgia

This study examines three first-year secondary science teachers’ espoused beliefs about laboratories and their classroom actions. From a cognitive constructivist perspective, I conducted case studies to examine the beliefs that Caroline, Jake, and Lane held about laboratory teaching and the tensions that emerged when their espoused beliefs and classroom actions were in conflict. From an analysis of interview, observation, and archival data, I constructed a profile of each first-year teacher’s beliefs about science laboratories. Caroline, Jake, and Lane each held beliefs about the purpose and the structure of laboratories. Caroline’s most salient belief concerned the purpose of laboratories as motivators. Caroline encountered tensions in thinking about laboratory teaching as a result of inconsistencies between her desire for students to have fun and their apathy toward engaging in laboratories. Jake’s most salient belief involved his need to control student behavior and laboratory procedures. Jake’s tensions in thinking about laboratory teaching emerged due to inconsistencies between his desire for student-centered learning and his need to maintain control of student behavior. Additionally, a tension emerged between Jake’s espoused student-centered beliefs and his perception of his students’ lack of confidence. Lane’s most salient belief focused on laboratories as useful tools for verifying lectured course material. Lane encountered tensions in thinking about laboratory teaching as a result of inconsistencies between her espoused student-centered beliefs and her desire to meet the expectations of her mentor teacher. The findings contribute to an understanding of the inconsistencies between the espoused beliefs and classroom actions of first-year teachers. Their struggles to bring their beliefs about laboratories into concert with the realities of their classrooms and the unique challenges of beginning science teachers are highlighted. Furthermore, the findings underscore the significance of identifying and challenging preservice teachers’ beliefs early in teacher education programs in an effort to align them with reform efforts toward more student-centered teaching. Implications for science teacher education programs are discussed and suggestions are made for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Lynn A. Bryan.

Subjects/Keywords: Teacher Beliefs

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Foster, R. E. (2004). First-year secondary science teachers’ beliefs about labs: investigating connections between espoused beliefs and classroom actions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/foster_rachel_e_200412_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Foster, Rachel Elizabeth. “First-year secondary science teachers’ beliefs about labs: investigating connections between espoused beliefs and classroom actions.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/foster_rachel_e_200412_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Foster, Rachel Elizabeth. “First-year secondary science teachers’ beliefs about labs: investigating connections between espoused beliefs and classroom actions.” 2004. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Foster RE. First-year secondary science teachers’ beliefs about labs: investigating connections between espoused beliefs and classroom actions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2004. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/foster_rachel_e_200412_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Foster RE. First-year secondary science teachers’ beliefs about labs: investigating connections between espoused beliefs and classroom actions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2004. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/foster_rachel_e_200412_phd


University of Georgia

3. Wang, Ping. Chinese science teachers' beliefs about and practices of assessment.

Degree: PhD, Science Education, 2004, University of Georgia

The purpose of this study is to examine Chinese science teachers’ beliefs and practice about assessment as well as the factors that affect their assessment beliefs and practice. I employed a qualitative research approach with three Chinese science teachers who taught chemistry, physics and biology, respectively. The data gathering procedures included classroom observations, interviews and document collection. The findings indicate that the teachers use assessment mainly for evaluating student performance, guiding instruction, and giving grade/score; teacher beliefs and practice about assessment are shaped by the goals for school science; the National College Entrance Examination greatly affects teacher beliefs and practice about assessment; school culture, such as administration involvement, colleagues’ attitudes, class size, and the length of class period affect teacher beliefs and practice. The significance, implications and limitations of the study are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Lynn A. Bryan.

Subjects/Keywords: Chinese Science Teachers

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wang, P. (2004). Chinese science teachers' beliefs about and practices of assessment. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wang_ping_200412_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Ping. “Chinese science teachers' beliefs about and practices of assessment.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wang_ping_200412_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Ping. “Chinese science teachers' beliefs about and practices of assessment.” 2004. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Wang P. Chinese science teachers' beliefs about and practices of assessment. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2004. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wang_ping_200412_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Wang P. Chinese science teachers' beliefs about and practices of assessment. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2004. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wang_ping_200412_phd

.