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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Laurence J. O\'Toole, Jr."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Kang, Seong Cheol. Alternative service delivery arrangements:: empirical essays on the coproduction of law enforcement.

Degree: PhD, Public Administration, 2018, University of Georgia

The use of volunteers constitutes a major service delivery alternative that local governments can utilize to generate benefits such as cost savings, increased service provision, and improvement of community relations. However, there is little information regarding why local governments adopt volunteer programs, what is the extent to which public agencies attain such benefits, and why citizens choose to volunteer in local government service delivery programs. This dissertation seeks to answer these questions by using two different law enforcement survey datasets to conduct three quasi-experimental analyses. More specifically, this study is composed of three empirical essays that investigate the following questions: first, the determinants of local law enforcement agencies’ adoption of volunteer officer programs; second, the impact of volunteer officers on organizational performance; and finally, the correlates of local residents’ participation in voluntary citizen patrols. Several key findings of this study include the following. In the first empirical chapter, the results show that a council-manager form of government, size of the agency budget, and community policing initiatives are positively associated with greater use of volunteer officers. Increased tax burden and union strength are negatively associated with greater use of volunteer officers. For the second empirical chapter, the findings demonstrate that an increase in the ratio of volunteer officers is negatively associated with police performance as measured by the clearance rate. Finally, the results for the third empirical chapter indicate that expressive motives such as greater community safety, the expectation that one’s efforts will lead to a decrease in community crimes, and the perception of the severity of crime problems are positively associated with more active participation in local voluntary citizen patrol. These findings provide useful information about why local governments use volunteers, the impact of volunteers on organizational performance, and the motivations behind why citizens participate in local government initiatives. Advisors/Committee Members: Laurence J. O'Toole, Jr..

Subjects/Keywords: Dissertation; Public Management; Public Administration; Volunteer; Local Government; Law Enforcement; Public Safety; Performance Measurement; Coproduction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kang, S. C. (2018). Alternative service delivery arrangements:: empirical essays on the coproduction of law enforcement. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38412

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kang, Seong Cheol. “Alternative service delivery arrangements:: empirical essays on the coproduction of law enforcement.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38412.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kang, Seong Cheol. “Alternative service delivery arrangements:: empirical essays on the coproduction of law enforcement.” 2018. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Kang SC. Alternative service delivery arrangements:: empirical essays on the coproduction of law enforcement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38412.

Council of Science Editors:

Kang SC. Alternative service delivery arrangements:: empirical essays on the coproduction of law enforcement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/38412


University of Georgia

2. Pitts, David Wayne. Diversity, representation, & performance: evidence about ethnicity in public organizations.

Degree: PhD, Public Administration, 2005, University of Georgia

In the past twenty years, growing percentages of ethnic minorities in the United States have led scholars to pay increased attention to the issue of diversity. While a number of convincing normative arguments for inclusion and integration have been advanced in the literature, very little research using public organizations as the unit of analysis has sought to understand the empirical impact of workforce diversity on work-related outcomes. Much of the public administration research on diversity stems from the normative view that any diversity leads to positive consequences, but theory from social psychology and organizational behavior research suggests that diversity can result in either positive or negative consequences, depending on the task at hand. This study contributes to the literature on diversity in public organizations by testing the impact of ethnic diversity and representation on a series of performance outcomes. I use data from the public education policy setting to test hypotheses linking ethnic diversity and representation among both public managers and street-level bureaucrats to organizational performance. The data consist of all Texas public school districts for each year between 1995 and 1999, and the models control for a number of environmental resources and constraints that tend to correspond to performance in public schools. The results of the study indicate that ethnic diversity among street-level bureaucrats corresponds to lower organizational performance, while ethnic representation among street-level bureaucrats corresponds to higher organizational performance. That is, the more ethnic variation among teachers, the lower the performance in the school district, but if that variation simply matches the variation of the students in the district, the schools perform better. Manager diversity and representation were unrelated to organizational outcomes across the board, leading to the conclusion that, when it comes to representational impacts, street-level bureaucrats are much more influential than managers. Advisors/Committee Members: Laurence J. O'Toole, Jr..

Subjects/Keywords: Diversity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pitts, D. W. (2005). Diversity, representation, & performance: evidence about ethnicity in public organizations. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/pitts_david_w_200508_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pitts, David Wayne. “Diversity, representation, & performance: evidence about ethnicity in public organizations.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/pitts_david_w_200508_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pitts, David Wayne. “Diversity, representation, & performance: evidence about ethnicity in public organizations.” 2005. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Pitts DW. Diversity, representation, & performance: evidence about ethnicity in public organizations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2005. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/pitts_david_w_200508_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Pitts DW. Diversity, representation, & performance: evidence about ethnicity in public organizations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2005. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/pitts_david_w_200508_phd

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