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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Katharina Wilson"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Hannon, Timothy. The transforming self and otherworldly wisdom: sources of poetic inspiration in medieval northwest Europe.

Degree: MA, Comparative Literature, 2010, University of Georgia

Certain tales of the medieval Norse, Anglo-Saxons, Irish and Welsh explain the source of poetic inspiration as existing in a world apart, whether that be in the realm of the gods, in the Celtic Otherworld, or with the Christian God. Generally, each culture follows a similar pattern in explaining the process of inspiration, beginning with a binding or a containment in the physical world, followed by danger-tinged contemplation, and eventually leading to communication with the source of poetry. The tales of these four cultures are discussed in terms of this schemata and compared with one another, eventually leading towards an understanding of wisdom that poetic composition may bring to a poet. Advisors/Committee Members: Katharina Wilson.

Subjects/Keywords: Medieval; Poetic inspiration; Inspiration; Poetry; Myth; Legend; Norse; Óðinn; Odin; Anglo-Saxon; Irish; Welsh; Medieval England; Medieval Ireland; Medieval Wales; Medieval Iceland; Medieval Scandinavia; Medieval poetry; Medieval Christianity; Taliesin

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hannon, T. (2010). The transforming self and otherworldly wisdom: sources of poetic inspiration in medieval northwest Europe. (Masters Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hannon_timothy_201005_ma

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hannon, Timothy. “The transforming self and otherworldly wisdom: sources of poetic inspiration in medieval northwest Europe.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hannon_timothy_201005_ma.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hannon, Timothy. “The transforming self and otherworldly wisdom: sources of poetic inspiration in medieval northwest Europe.” 2010. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hannon T. The transforming self and otherworldly wisdom: sources of poetic inspiration in medieval northwest Europe. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Georgia; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hannon_timothy_201005_ma.

Council of Science Editors:

Hannon T. The transforming self and otherworldly wisdom: sources of poetic inspiration in medieval northwest Europe. [Masters Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2010. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hannon_timothy_201005_ma


University of Georgia

2. Roney, Kristen Simmons. The devil himself: an examination of redemption in the Faust legends.

Degree: PhD, Comparative Literature, 2006, University of Georgia

Careful readers can see Faust everywhere; he continues to appear in film, in politics, and in various forms of popular culture. From Hrotsvit, to Spies, to Marlowe, Goethe, Mann, Mofolo and even Levin’s Rosemary’s Baby, Faust is a fascinating subject because he is so human; the devil (in whatever form he takes—from poodle to bald androgyne) is representative of our desires—many of which we are fearful of expressing. He fascinates because he acts on the very desires we wish to repress and reveals the cultural milieu of desire in his damnation or redemption. It is from this angle that I propose to examine the Faust legends: redemption. Though this dissertation is, ideally, part of a much larger study on the redemption topoi in literature, Faust exemplifies the problems and definitions. Studied most often as a single text subject, say Goethe’s Faust or Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper,” redemption lacks significant research on its own grounds, despite it prevalence in literature, except where it is encoded within the discussion of the function of literature itself. I propose, instead, that Redemption has a four related, but separate, uses in literature and literary interpretation involving sacred, secular, political, and aesthetic redemptions. In order to elucidate the matter, I will use the Faust legends and the appearance of redemption within them. Advisors/Committee Members: Katharina Wilson.

Subjects/Keywords: Redemption

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Roney, K. S. (2006). The devil himself: an examination of redemption in the Faust legends. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/roney_kristen_s_200605_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Roney, Kristen Simmons. “The devil himself: an examination of redemption in the Faust legends.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/roney_kristen_s_200605_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Roney, Kristen Simmons. “The devil himself: an examination of redemption in the Faust legends.” 2006. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Roney KS. The devil himself: an examination of redemption in the Faust legends. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2006. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/roney_kristen_s_200605_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Roney KS. The devil himself: an examination of redemption in the Faust legends. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2006. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/roney_kristen_s_200605_phd

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