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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Karen Russell"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Wilcox, Donna Lenise. Understanding difference: public relations instructors' conceptualization of diversity and its use in the classroom.

Degree: MA, Journalism and Mass Communication, 2009, University of Georgia

There is currently little scholarly research on public relations education, less on diversity education in public relations and none that looks at how professors define diversity and how they pass the message to their students. In-depth interviews, via telephone, were used to understand how public relations instructors conceptualize diversity, specifically ethnic and racial diversity, and how they present the message to their students. Definitions of diversity proved just as diverse as the people providing them. However, the definitions were not all in line with Banks’ conceptualization of truly embracing difference. Some instructors saw the value in diversity, but their inclusion of diversity was not effective according to Critical Race Theorists standards. Identity played a major role both in the conceptualization and the practice of diversity. Advisors/Committee Members: Karen Russell.

Subjects/Keywords: Diversity

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APA (6th Edition):

Wilcox, D. L. (2009). Understanding difference: public relations instructors' conceptualization of diversity and its use in the classroom. (Masters Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wilcox_donna_l_200908_ma

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilcox, Donna Lenise. “Understanding difference: public relations instructors' conceptualization of diversity and its use in the classroom.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed September 22, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wilcox_donna_l_200908_ma.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilcox, Donna Lenise. “Understanding difference: public relations instructors' conceptualization of diversity and its use in the classroom.” 2009. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Wilcox DL. Understanding difference: public relations instructors' conceptualization of diversity and its use in the classroom. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Georgia; 2009. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wilcox_donna_l_200908_ma.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilcox DL. Understanding difference: public relations instructors' conceptualization of diversity and its use in the classroom. [Masters Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2009. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wilcox_donna_l_200908_ma


University of Georgia

2. Richardson, Kerry. How public relations practitioners at historically black colleges & universities define influence.

Degree: MA, Journalism, 2007, University of Georgia

This study is a replication and extension of the Influence Interviews conducted by Berger and Reber. Their study, conducted in 2004, interviewed 65 public relations professionals to examine how practitioners defined influence. The current study examined how public relations practitioners at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) define influence within the practice. Analysis of interviews with twenty-five practitioners, representing roughly one-fourth of all HBCUs today, found that practitioners at HBCUs define influence in many of the same ways as their counterparts in other areas of public relations. More often than not, practitioners deemed influence as having a seat at the decision-making table, which essentially represents an opportunity for one’s voice to be heard and recommendations to be taken into consideration. Other important factors mentioned, but the most consistent response was having direct access to the president and upper levels of administration. Advisors/Committee Members: Karen Russell.

Subjects/Keywords: Public relations

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APA (6th Edition):

Richardson, K. (2007). How public relations practitioners at historically black colleges & universities define influence. (Masters Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/richardson_kerry_200708_ma

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Richardson, Kerry. “How public relations practitioners at historically black colleges & universities define influence.” 2007. Masters Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed September 22, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/richardson_kerry_200708_ma.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Richardson, Kerry. “How public relations practitioners at historically black colleges & universities define influence.” 2007. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Richardson K. How public relations practitioners at historically black colleges & universities define influence. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Georgia; 2007. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/richardson_kerry_200708_ma.

Council of Science Editors:

Richardson K. How public relations practitioners at historically black colleges & universities define influence. [Masters Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2007. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/richardson_kerry_200708_ma

3. Myers, Marcus Cayce. Revising the narrative of early U.S. public relations history: an analysis of the depictions of PR practice and professionals in the popular press 1770-1918.

Degree: PhD, Mass Communication, 2014, University of Georgia

This dissertation challenges current historical narratives about early public relations practice in the United States from 1770 to 1918. Histories of U.S. PR typically argue that American public relations began with low-level press agentry and rose to a professional form in twentieth century corporate America. This narrative incorrectly portrays public relations history as corporate, evolutionary and rooted in the unprofessional practices of press agentry. This dissertation challenges this popular account of U.S. public relations history. More than 3,200 articles that described public relations in the American popular press from 1770 to 1918 were analyzed to create a revised narrative of PR history. Specific attention was paid to the meaning of the term public relations, propaganda, press agentry, publicity agent, and publicity bureau. Analysis shows that public relations practice was used in government, politics, at the grassroots, and in corporations. This dissertation argues that U.S. public relations was not a twentieth century creation, PR history is not an evolutionary process, and that non-corporate spheres influenced PR relations practice. From this analysis a new narrative of public relations history is presented. Advisors/Committee Members: Karen Russell.

Subjects/Keywords: Public Relations; PR; PR history; popular press; media history

…Meg Lamme and Karen Russell explain in their 2010 historiographical survey of PR history… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Myers, M. C. (2014). Revising the narrative of early U.S. public relations history: an analysis of the depictions of PR practice and professionals in the popular press 1770-1918. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/myers_marcus_c_201405_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Myers, Marcus Cayce. “Revising the narrative of early U.S. public relations history: an analysis of the depictions of PR practice and professionals in the popular press 1770-1918.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed September 22, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/myers_marcus_c_201405_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Myers, Marcus Cayce. “Revising the narrative of early U.S. public relations history: an analysis of the depictions of PR practice and professionals in the popular press 1770-1918.” 2014. Web. 22 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Myers MC. Revising the narrative of early U.S. public relations history: an analysis of the depictions of PR practice and professionals in the popular press 1770-1918. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2014. [cited 2019 Sep 22]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/myers_marcus_c_201405_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Myers MC. Revising the narrative of early U.S. public relations history: an analysis of the depictions of PR practice and professionals in the popular press 1770-1918. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2014. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/myers_marcus_c_201405_phd

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