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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Joseph R. Dominick"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Cotton, Clarence Joseph. Mass media channel repertoire : motive, residential location, type of medium and resident type as predictors of media activity.

Degree: PhD, Mass Communication, 2002, University of Georgia

Is a respondent’s residential location a significant variable in explaining the formation of a channel repertoire from among the mass media available in distinct geographic regions? Four hundred eighteen college students completed surveys between the spring of 1997 and the fall of 2000. Respondents identified which interpersonal and mass media activities they were most likely to use to satisfy nine Uses and Gratification motives. A Chi-Square and t-test were used to determine the likelihood that a medium would be used to satisfy a particular motive and the number of media included in a respondent’s channel repertoire, respectively. Results indicate that for certain motives urban respondents were more likely to use interpersonal and mass media activities than rural respondents. Further, urban respondents have a larger number of mass media activities in their repertoire than rural respondents. Most notably, the control variables (race, gender and income level) were better predictors of media activity than residential location, type of medium or resident type. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph R. Dominick.

Subjects/Keywords: Uses and Gratifications

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cotton, C. J. (2002). Mass media channel repertoire : motive, residential location, type of medium and resident type as predictors of media activity. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/cotton_clarence_j_200208_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cotton, Clarence Joseph. “Mass media channel repertoire : motive, residential location, type of medium and resident type as predictors of media activity.” 2002. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed June 16, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/cotton_clarence_j_200208_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cotton, Clarence Joseph. “Mass media channel repertoire : motive, residential location, type of medium and resident type as predictors of media activity.” 2002. Web. 16 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Cotton CJ. Mass media channel repertoire : motive, residential location, type of medium and resident type as predictors of media activity. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2002. [cited 2019 Jun 16]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/cotton_clarence_j_200208_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Cotton CJ. Mass media channel repertoire : motive, residential location, type of medium and resident type as predictors of media activity. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2002. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/cotton_clarence_j_200208_phd


University of Georgia

2. Kim, Yeora. The impact of the Internet on children's daily lives : physical, social and psychological well-being.

Degree: PhD, Mass Communication, 2003, University of Georgia

This study investigated the children’s Internet use behavior and how the Internet usage changes children’s daily lives. 297 children in 4th through 9th grades participated in survey. Particularly, this study examined how children allocated their time to different media and daily activities and the relationship between children’s Internet use and level of physical activities, social involvement and relationship, and loneliness. This study found no displacement effect of the Internet on children’s daily activities. Rather, it was found that children who spend more time on the Internet were more likely to spend more time with other media, more time on some kind of physical activities, and were more socially involved. The Internet provided a place for communication and social relationships for children. Net-generation children surrounded by media were not necessarily giving up other activities that were also important for their intellectual, physical, social and psychological development. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph R. Dominick.

Subjects/Keywords: Children

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kim, Y. (2003). The impact of the Internet on children's daily lives : physical, social and psychological well-being. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kim_yeora_200305_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Yeora. “The impact of the Internet on children's daily lives : physical, social and psychological well-being.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed June 16, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kim_yeora_200305_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Yeora. “The impact of the Internet on children's daily lives : physical, social and psychological well-being.” 2003. Web. 16 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Kim Y. The impact of the Internet on children's daily lives : physical, social and psychological well-being. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2003. [cited 2019 Jun 16]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kim_yeora_200305_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Kim Y. The impact of the Internet on children's daily lives : physical, social and psychological well-being. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2003. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kim_yeora_200305_phd


University of Georgia

3. Woo, Hyung-Jin. The hacker mentality : exploring the relationship between psychological variables and hacking activities.

Degree: PhD, Mass Communication, 2003, University of Georgia

This study investigated hackers’ psychological variables and how these variables affect their hacking activities in cyberspace. 1,385 hackers from 30 different countries participated in an on-line survey. Specifically, this research examined 1) how hackers’ personality affects their angry temperament, reaction, and behavior, 2) what motivations prompt hackers to be involved in hacking activities, 3) why they keep breaking into others’ computer systems, and 4) how they respond when they face a threat to their own cultural worldviews. The results indicated that hackers with high narcissism reported more aggressiveness scores than hackers with low level of narcissism. Intrinsic motivation as well as extrinsic motivation in a hacker was partially associated with hackers’ aggressiveness. Hackers with high level of flow tended to get more involved into hacking activities than hackers with low level of flow. Hackers who strongly endorsed nationalism showed higher aggressiveness scores than hackers with lower levels of nationalism when they felt threatened. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph R. Dominick.

Subjects/Keywords: Hackers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Woo, H. (2003). The hacker mentality : exploring the relationship between psychological variables and hacking activities. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/woo_hyung-jin_200305_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Woo, Hyung-Jin. “The hacker mentality : exploring the relationship between psychological variables and hacking activities.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed June 16, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/woo_hyung-jin_200305_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Woo, Hyung-Jin. “The hacker mentality : exploring the relationship between psychological variables and hacking activities.” 2003. Web. 16 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Woo H. The hacker mentality : exploring the relationship between psychological variables and hacking activities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2003. [cited 2019 Jun 16]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/woo_hyung-jin_200305_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Woo H. The hacker mentality : exploring the relationship between psychological variables and hacking activities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2003. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/woo_hyung-jin_200305_phd

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