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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Jepkorir Rose Chepyator-Thomson"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Xu, Furong. Physical activity opportunity in Georgia middle schools: a cross-sectional survey of frequency and correlates.

Degree: PhD, Physical Education and Sport Studies, 2007, University of Georgia

School-based interventions are important to help children improve their activity levels, and to gain health benefits. School physical and social environments are expected to have impact on student physical activity involvement. The purpose of this study was to determine the status of physical activity opportunities afforded to public middle school students, to discover factors that are associated with physical activity opportunities that are made available to the students, and to examine the interactions between those factors and physical activity opportunities in middle schools setting. This study measures physical education teachers’ perceived physical activity opportunities, existing factors, and the relationship between them. The study involved distributing a 96-item questionnaire to 421 public middle school physical education teachers in Georgia. Participants in the study were required to fill out an online survey, which took about 25 minutes. To conduct the research, a questionnaire based on the work of other researchers was modified (Barnett et al., 2006). The majority of the questions were rated on one Likert scales ranging from 1 = strongly disagree to 2 = somewhat disagree, 3 = somewhat agree, to 4 = strongly agree. Items not rated on a Likert scale included questions about the percentage of motor activity involvement, the number of special events, the number of hours engaged in extracurricular physical activity and the time spent on physical education per week. Two hundred and ninety two physical education teachers responded to the survey with two hundred forty three effective responses from 181 public middle schools in Georgia, and a 37% response rate was reached. It was found that physical education was available to students more than once a week in 94.2% of schools (n =160). The average length of the physical education class was 186 minutes per week (range 0-450); the median length of the extracurricular physical activity time was 5.78 hours per week (range 0 to 20 hours); the median number of special events was seven times per year per school; and the median time for organized physical opportunity was 39 minutes daily (range 0-90 minutes). When the association between environment factors and students’ physical activity opportunity has examined, three key findings were identified: (1) there was a statistically significant association between social climate indicators and students’ physical activity opportunities, (2) there was a statistically significant association between physical environment indicators (facilities) and students’ physical activity opportunities, and (3) there was statistically significant differences in school location on students’ physical activity opportunities. The results indicate that school environment influences student physical activity opportunities and student interest influences their level of activity involvement. KEY WORDS: Middle school grades, Physical activity opportunities, Physical activity levels Advisors/Committee Members: Jepkorir Rose Chepyator-Thomson.

Subjects/Keywords: Middle school grades

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Xu, F. (2007). Physical activity opportunity in Georgia middle schools: a cross-sectional survey of frequency and correlates. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/xu_furong_200705_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Xu, Furong. “Physical activity opportunity in Georgia middle schools: a cross-sectional survey of frequency and correlates.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed April 25, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/xu_furong_200705_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Xu, Furong. “Physical activity opportunity in Georgia middle schools: a cross-sectional survey of frequency and correlates.” 2007. Web. 25 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Xu F. Physical activity opportunity in Georgia middle schools: a cross-sectional survey of frequency and correlates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2007. [cited 2019 Apr 25]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/xu_furong_200705_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Xu F. Physical activity opportunity in Georgia middle schools: a cross-sectional survey of frequency and correlates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2007. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/xu_furong_200705_phd


University of Georgia

2. Culp, Brian O'Neal. Teaching methods and life experiences of urban elementary physical education teachers.

Degree: EdD, Physical Education, 2005, University of Georgia

Demographic changes that are occurring across the country have created a need to examine curriculum outcomes and teaching of diverse learners in urban school environments. Students in physical education programs in particular reflect these cultural and racial changes. Physical education is an appropriate subject for teachers to introduce culturally responsive pedagogy into the learning environment. The purpose of this study was to examine methods of instruction that African American and Caucasian American elementary physical education teachers use in urban schools. A second goal was to add to existing literature regarding the instruction of students from diverse backgrounds in physical education. In this qualitative study, I.M.P.A.C.T. survey instrument (Culp & Chepyator-Thomson, 2004) was used as a guide to gauge urban physical education teachers’ methods of instruction. The sample of teachers who participated in the study came from 52 elementary schools in a large southeastern urban city in the United States. Grounded theory served as the method that guided the examination of themes from the survey. Constant comparison analysis (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) was used to determine themes that emerged from the data. The major findings from the study include the following themes: (a) role modeling, (b) intrinsic and extrinsic satisfaction, (c) promotion of lifelong activities to students, (d) enthusiasm and (e) life experiences. Strategies for teaching centered on the adherence to rules and guidelines, teacher and student modeling and inclusion of students in activities. Teachers reported little multicultural training in their teacher preparation. Lesson and curriculum outcomes did not significantly represent exposure to multicultural concepts. Methods of communication teachers used related primarily to language, not non-verbal or verbal communication. Recommendations for improvement included 1) reconfiguring current multicultural training in schools 2) utilizing physical education teachers’ input in curriculum construction, 3) instituting more multicultural concepts and experiences in PETE programs and 4) creating a more inclusive academic atmosphere for students of racial, cultural and social backgrounds. Research of this nature can be tailored to specific school systems in order to evaluate existing programs and determine if they are worthy of reform. Advisors/Committee Members: Jepkorir Rose Chepyator-Thomson.

Subjects/Keywords: Multicultural Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Culp, B. O. (2005). Teaching methods and life experiences of urban elementary physical education teachers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/culp_brian_o_200508_edd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Culp, Brian O'Neal. “Teaching methods and life experiences of urban elementary physical education teachers.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed April 25, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/culp_brian_o_200508_edd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Culp, Brian O'Neal. “Teaching methods and life experiences of urban elementary physical education teachers.” 2005. Web. 25 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Culp BO. Teaching methods and life experiences of urban elementary physical education teachers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2005. [cited 2019 Apr 25]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/culp_brian_o_200508_edd.

Council of Science Editors:

Culp BO. Teaching methods and life experiences of urban elementary physical education teachers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2005. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/culp_brian_o_200508_edd


University of Georgia

3. Hsu, Shan-Hui. Imagination in physical education: a ccomparative study of youth identity and body-schema in elementary school students.

Degree: PhD, Physical Education, 2005, University of Georgia

Home-education, school-education and recent technology revolution are intertwined in shaping children’s identity in the context of body movement and body-schema. Moreover, the notion of imagination in physical education emphasizes one’s “body image” and “body schema,” and is represented in a nature of object (i.e. body movement) and fantasized as the corporeal postural model of the body in one’s Utopian visions instead of reality action. As Sepper (1996) points out, “[i]magination by its nature has as object that is not really ‘there,’ and in dreams and hallucinations, it takes appearances for reality” (p. 1). The imaginational context of body movement, as a social phenomenon, varies from culture to culture, from traditional to modern/postmodern society, from a local village to a global world, and from actual to virtual reality. The purpose of study was to investigate how young children, specifically in third/fourth grade children, from different ethnic groups and cultural environments construct and present their body-schema in contemporary physical education classroom. Four major ethnic populations were focused upon: Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic-American, and Asian-American. Twenty-two third and fourth graders (8 males and 14 females) from Yaya Elementary School, Georgia, the United States and Cathay Elementary School, Taipei, Taiwan participated in the study. The methods of data collection included: 1) informal and formal interviews; 2) non-participated observation; and 3) document analysis. Data were analyzed by constant comparative method to achieve a better understanding of children’s body-schema construction according to their various family and cultural backgrounds so as to increase school teacher’s awareness of their different body movements and to help develop culturally responsive educational curriculum in elementary physical education. Four major themes were revealed in the study: a) father-image/mother-image and sibling-image/PE teacher-image; b) gender and sports; c) technology, body-image and the imaginary; and d) mapping cultural images. Results indicated children’s imagination in body-schema/body-image was found to be largely governed by both cultural and social elements. Consequently, youth identity formation has been transformed in a multicultural/global environment where social and cultural conditions had been drastically changed. Advisors/Committee Members: Jepkorir Rose Chepyator-Thomson.

Subjects/Keywords: imagination

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hsu, S. (2005). Imagination in physical education: a ccomparative study of youth identity and body-schema in elementary school students. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hsu_shan-hui_200508_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hsu, Shan-Hui. “Imagination in physical education: a ccomparative study of youth identity and body-schema in elementary school students.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed April 25, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hsu_shan-hui_200508_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hsu, Shan-Hui. “Imagination in physical education: a ccomparative study of youth identity and body-schema in elementary school students.” 2005. Web. 25 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Hsu S. Imagination in physical education: a ccomparative study of youth identity and body-schema in elementary school students. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2005. [cited 2019 Apr 25]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hsu_shan-hui_200508_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Hsu S. Imagination in physical education: a ccomparative study of youth identity and body-schema in elementary school students. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2005. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hsu_shan-hui_200508_phd

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