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You searched for +publisher:"University of Georgia" +contributor:("Jay Aronson"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Wang, Hui. Enhancing knowledge transfer through nurturing cognitive flexibility.

Degree: PhD, Business Administration, 2007, University of Georgia

The ability to leverage knowledge has become a core competence of organizations to compete in the contemporary economy. Knowledge management systems using knowledge repositories capture valuable knowledge assets for future reuse. How knowledge can be presented in these systems to support effective knowledge reuse becomes a critical challenge. Knowledge transfer is an essential knowledge reuse process which involves adopting knowledge from its original problem-solving context to a different context, and adapting the knowledge to solve new problems. Adaptation is vital, yet challenging. This problem was explored from the individual knowledge worker’s perspective. Integrating the research from the educational psychology and learning literatures, this study posits that a knowledge worker’s flexible understanding of the knowledge has a positive impact on the transfer (as in the sense of application) of that knowledge; and that a knowledge worker’s flexible understanding of specific knowledge content can be improved through knowledge presentations that emphasize cognitive flexibility. Further, it was purported that in an effective, successful knowledge management system, knowledge should be presented to enhance flexible understanding, and consequently, improve knowledge transfer. The principles of knowledge presentation that promote flexible understandings were explored and used in an experiment. The empirical findings partially confirmed the effect of knowledge presentation on developing flexible understandings. It was found that the effect of knowledge presentation depends on individuals’ cognitive traits. This interaction effect and the implications to research and practice are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Jay Aronson.

Subjects/Keywords: Knowledge management

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wang, H. (2007). Enhancing knowledge transfer through nurturing cognitive flexibility. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wang_hui_200708_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Hui. “Enhancing knowledge transfer through nurturing cognitive flexibility.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed May 22, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wang_hui_200708_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Hui. “Enhancing knowledge transfer through nurturing cognitive flexibility.” 2007. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Wang H. Enhancing knowledge transfer through nurturing cognitive flexibility. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2007. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wang_hui_200708_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Wang H. Enhancing knowledge transfer through nurturing cognitive flexibility. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2007. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wang_hui_200708_phd


University of Georgia

2. Higgins, Guy Moore. "If you build it, will they come?": a study of the effect of system structure on the institutionalization of knowledge management within organizations.

Degree: PhD, Business Administration, 2001, University of Georgia

The importance of knowledge in any venture has long been recognized. Long ago, Sir Francis Bacon (1597) wrote, "knowledge is power." More recently, however, management theorists and corporate leaders have become almost strident in their espousal of both the importance of knowledge and the need to carefully manage it in the business process. Lew Platt, chief executive of Hewlett- Packard, may have best expressed this when he said, "If HP knew what HP knows, we would be three times as profitable" (Stewart, 1997a).|To address the need to manage their "knowledge," many organizations have adopted a variety of technologies under the general aegis of "knowledge management systems." Some see these systems as simply a subset of information management and "…suspect that nothing more substantial than 'terminological inflation' is taking place…" (Davenport, 1999), while others see them as the natural evolution of the earlier information management systems, but an evolution that is reaching a higher plane and that is more or less clearly delineated from their information management systems forebears.|Orlikowski and Robey (1991) have proposed Giddens' (1979; 1982; 1984; 1993) Theory of Structuration as a framework for investigating the interaction between organizations and information technology. This dissertation studied the effect of knowledge management system structure on the institutionalization of the process of knowledge management in three global professional services companies. A number of critical success factors for the development and implementation of knowledge management systems were uncovered and support was found for using Giddens' (1979; 1982; 1984; 1993) Theory of Structuration as a surrogate for a measure of a successful knowledge management system. The findings suggest that knowledge management systems do represent an evolution in information management and that significant future study is needed. Advisors/Committee Members: Jay Aronson.

Subjects/Keywords: Knowledge Management

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Higgins, G. M. (2001). "If you build it, will they come?": a study of the effect of system structure on the institutionalization of knowledge management within organizations. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/higgins_guy_m_200112_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Higgins, Guy Moore. “"If you build it, will they come?": a study of the effect of system structure on the institutionalization of knowledge management within organizations.” 2001. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed May 22, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/higgins_guy_m_200112_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Higgins, Guy Moore. “"If you build it, will they come?": a study of the effect of system structure on the institutionalization of knowledge management within organizations.” 2001. Web. 22 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Higgins GM. "If you build it, will they come?": a study of the effect of system structure on the institutionalization of knowledge management within organizations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2001. [cited 2019 May 22]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/higgins_guy_m_200112_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Higgins GM. "If you build it, will they come?": a study of the effect of system structure on the institutionalization of knowledge management within organizations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2001. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/higgins_guy_m_200112_phd

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