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You searched for +publisher:"University of Fort Hare" +contributor:("Dianne Shober"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Kirton, Teneille. Racial exploitation and double oppression in selected Bessie Head and Doris Lessing texts.

Degree: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, 2010, University of Fort Hare

During the era of discrimination and disparity in Southern Africa, racial inequality silenced many black writers. It was the white authors that dominated the literary environment presenting their biased views on social and political concerns; the black authors standpoints were seen as unimportant and they were deemed inferior to the white authors. Consequently, it was particularly difficult for black writers to voice their experiences of living in a society riddled with oppression, prejudice and unequal opportunities. The purpose of this study is to critically compare selected texts by African authors Doris Lessing and Bessie Head, which depict the political and social struggles within Southern African society during the era of unequal opportunities. Lessing and Head’s works present incidents of life experiences in Southern Africa from two contrasting viewpoints. The selected texts explored are: The Grass is Singing and “The Old Chief Mshlanga” by Doris Lessing, a white author, in contrast and comparison to the texts: A Question of Power and “The Collector of Treasures” by Bessie Head, a coloured author. The research for this thesis is conducted from an ethnic literary perspective with careful consideration to critical race theory and cultural studies. From this perspective, the focus of the study is on the struggles that affected both the victim and perpetrator during the apartheid era as well as on the idea that those in power determined what was deemed acceptable and unacceptable, behaviourally and ideologically. Specifically, the plight experienced by the female characters living in a patriarchal society, and the segregation and racial inequality faced by the characters of colour is explored by analysing these characters’ influences, pressures and societal manipulations and constraints in the texts. Thus, this study will provide a more in-depth understanding of Southern African society during the apartheid era and the strategic use of literature to spotlight the subjugation and disparity. Advisors/Committee Members: Dianne Shober.

Subjects/Keywords: Authors, South African – 20th century Biography; Apartheid in literature; Exploitation; Women authors, South African – 20th century Biography; Racism in literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Kirton, T. (2010). Racial exploitation and double oppression in selected Bessie Head and Doris Lessing texts. (Thesis). University of Fort Hare. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10353/232

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kirton, Teneille. “Racial exploitation and double oppression in selected Bessie Head and Doris Lessing texts.” 2010. Thesis, University of Fort Hare. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10353/232.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kirton, Teneille. “Racial exploitation and double oppression in selected Bessie Head and Doris Lessing texts.” 2010. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Kirton T. Racial exploitation and double oppression in selected Bessie Head and Doris Lessing texts. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Fort Hare; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10353/232.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kirton T. Racial exploitation and double oppression in selected Bessie Head and Doris Lessing texts. [Thesis]. University of Fort Hare; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10353/232

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Makati, Pamela. A critical study of Charles Dickens' representation of the socially disadvantage.

Degree: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, 2008, University of Fort Hare

This research is an examination of Charles Dickens’ representation of the underprivileged in the Victorian society. The socially disadvantaged members that will be under discussion are the poor, women and children, who are of major concern in Dickens’ selected texts namely Bleak House, Great Expectations, Hard Times and Oliver Twist. It is evident that Dickens noted the impact of industrialisation on the Victorian society as it created a massive urban development, leading to a higher class division. Initially, the English society consisted of the aristocracy, the landed gentry and the servants who belonged to the lower class. The influx of industrialisation created a further division of these classes in which there emerged the capitalists or bourgeoisie, who were the industrialists like Mr. Bounderby in Hard Times, and the working class, who were the industrial workers. Although the Industrial Revolution fostered urban growth, it is unfortunate that the number of the poor also increased. Many of them lived under squalid conditions with poor sanitation leading to fatal diseases and even death. Being a socially conscious writer, Dickens depicts the world in which he lives, as a strategy to raise awareness in his readers of what was really happening, and hopefully, to bring social reforms. Apart from the poor, Dickens also portrays the brutal treatment of children at the workhouses. This research will show that Dickens was an obstinate critique of the Poor Law and its administration. Furthermore, it will be proven that Dickens also abhorred child labour because of his own childhood experience. Moreover, his repugnance is also noted in the way he creates child characters like Oliver Twist who are mistreated and exploited as child workers. Dickens representation of women is largely influenced by the Victorian ideology surrounding the role of women in society. It is evident that the English society was very patriarchal and strongly confined women to domesticity. Women were also expected to uphold virtue and purity and if they lost both, they were despised and not tolerated at all by society. Although Dickens creates both the Victorian stereotypical woman who is the “angel in the house,” and the antitypical women who comprise of the prostitutes, those who bear children out of wedlock and the larger than life characters like Mrs. Joe Gargery and Molly in Great Expectations, he is revealing the different types of women one can find in society. Moreover, the juxtaposition of the stereotype and the antitype is also a suggestion of the latter’s struggle to fight against patriarchy by assuming the unexpected. Therefore, this research will prove that Dickens is not a patriarchal writer but he actually sympathizes with the plight of women. A realist and naturalist reading of Dickens’ selected texts will provide literary theory for this research. Writing during the time that both theories were grounded, it is evident that Dickens adopted both elemental forms of writing. A feminist approach to Dickens’ female characters will also… Advisors/Committee Members: Dianne Shober.

Subjects/Keywords: People with disabilities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Makati, P. (2008). A critical study of Charles Dickens' representation of the socially disadvantage. (Thesis). University of Fort Hare. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10353/173

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Makati, Pamela. “A critical study of Charles Dickens' representation of the socially disadvantage.” 2008. Thesis, University of Fort Hare. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10353/173.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Makati, Pamela. “A critical study of Charles Dickens' representation of the socially disadvantage.” 2008. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Makati P. A critical study of Charles Dickens' representation of the socially disadvantage. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Fort Hare; 2008. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10353/173.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Makati P. A critical study of Charles Dickens' representation of the socially disadvantage. [Thesis]. University of Fort Hare; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10353/173

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Bonnie Becker. A feminist analysis of Lyman Frank Baum’s the wonderful wizard of oz, Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of green gables and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s the secret garden.

Degree: M.Soc. Sc, Arts, 2013, University of Fort Hare

The primary aim of this project is to provide a close contextual and textual analysis of the selected children’s classics: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Anne of Green Gables and The Secret Garden using the feminist literary theory. From this perspective I have shown how the selected works of Lyman Frank Baum, Lucy Maud Montgomery and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s writing have contributed to women’s stereotypical roles within society and perpetuated their subjugated position. I have also conducted an examination of the extent to which the female protagonists attempt to emancipate themselves from gender oppression. A comparative study of the selected children’s texts has not yet been conducted and therefore this project serves as a significant contribution to this field of study. An exploration of the historical background of the authors and children’s literature is conducted to provide an overview into the inner workings of the writers’ lives and the historical significance of children’s literature as a genre. The theoretical framework of feminist literary theory is used in the analysis of the selected texts. The connection between feminist literary theory and children’s literature is highlighted and provides further understanding of the purpose of this study. The history of feminism as both a movement and a contemporary literary criticism is explored. Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex is used when analysing the texts’ characters and how they are based on society’s stereotypical gender roles. Luce Irigaray’s Speculum of the Other Woman and This Sex Which is Not One is examined to aid in an exploration of psychological female oppression through feminine and masculine discourse evident in the creation of the novels’ female and male characters. Hélène Cixous’ “The Laugh of the Medusa” and The Newly Born Woman is interrogated according to the stereotypical ideology surrounding the terms masculinity and femininity and how these terms are interpreted in the selected works. Judith Butler’s Gender Trouble and Undoing Gender are additionally explored to assist in the understanding of the concept of gender performativity and through the lens of Butler’s interpolation of gender the move towards the emancipation of women is seen in the selected children’s texts. The close textual feminist analysis focuses on the female protagonists: Dorothy, Anne and Mary as well as the secondary female characters: the wicked witches, Aunt Em, the Queen of the Field-Mice, the princess made from china, Glinda’s female soldiers from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; Marilla Cuthbert, Rachel Lynde and Diana Barry from Anne of Green Gables and Martha, Mrs Sowerby and Mrs Craven from The Secret Garden. The portrayal of the secondary male characters are additionally explored according to feminist literary theory: The Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, the Lion and the wizard Oz from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; Matthew Cuthbert and Gilbert Blythe from Anne of the Green Gables’ and Mr Craven, Colin Craven and Dickon Sowerby from The Secret Garden. The comparison of these… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Dianne Shober.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Becker, B. (2013). A feminist analysis of Lyman Frank Baum’s the wonderful wizard of oz, Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of green gables and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s the secret garden. (Masters Thesis). University of Fort Hare. Retrieved from http://contentpro.seals.ac.za/iii/cpro/DigitalItemViewPage.external?sp=1018605

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Becker, Bonnie. “A feminist analysis of Lyman Frank Baum’s the wonderful wizard of oz, Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of green gables and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s the secret garden.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Fort Hare. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://contentpro.seals.ac.za/iii/cpro/DigitalItemViewPage.external?sp=1018605.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Becker, Bonnie. “A feminist analysis of Lyman Frank Baum’s the wonderful wizard of oz, Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of green gables and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s the secret garden.” 2013. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Becker B. A feminist analysis of Lyman Frank Baum’s the wonderful wizard of oz, Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of green gables and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s the secret garden. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Fort Hare; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://contentpro.seals.ac.za/iii/cpro/DigitalItemViewPage.external?sp=1018605.

Council of Science Editors:

Becker B. A feminist analysis of Lyman Frank Baum’s the wonderful wizard of oz, Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of green gables and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s the secret garden. [Masters Thesis]. University of Fort Hare; 2013. Available from: http://contentpro.seals.ac.za/iii/cpro/DigitalItemViewPage.external?sp=1018605

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