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You searched for +publisher:"University of Florida" +contributor:("Yezierski, Robert P."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Florida

1. Marcinkiewcz, Catherine. A role for the organic cation transporter-3 in stress-induced psychopathology.

Degree: PhD, Medical Sciences - Neuroscience (IDP), 2010, University of Florida

The molecular genetic basis of individual susceptibility to stress-related psychiatric disorders is a subject of intense interest in the neuroscience community. For example, studies have shown that genetic polymorphisms in the 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5HTT) gene are associated with an increased likelihood of developing Major Depression, and it is likely that multiple other important signaling mechanisms may be disrupted in these knockouts. Genetic expression of organic cation transporter-3 (OCT3), a corticosterone-sensitive monoamine transporter, is upregulated in the hippocampus of 5HTT-deficient mice, suggesting that the OCT3 may play an important role in the regulation of cellular function relevant to major depression. In the present study, we characterized basal and stress-induced expression of the (OCT3) in the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and striatum of Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and Long-Evans (LE) rats by real-time PCR and Western blot. The WKY strain exhibits depressive-like behavior, heightened sensitivity to stress and a muted response to conventional antidepressants of the SSRI class, whereas the LE strain has been described as stress-resilient, exhibiting more active coping responses to stress. In our study, 5HTT gene expression was significantly downregulated in the hippocampus of WKY relative to LE rats with a corresponding basal elevation of the OCT3 in both the hippocampus and mPFC. These results indicate that the OCT3, which serves as a back-up transporter when the 5HTT is saturated or in low abundance, may be a critical modulator of 5HT clearance in the WKY rat. Rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: 1) control 2) acute restraint stress and 3) repeated social defeat + acute restraint stress. OCT3 gene expression was upregulated in the WKY rats exposed to acute restraint stress after a history of social defeat, but not in WKY rats exposed to acute restraint stress alone. By contrast, acute stress induced a robust increase in OCT3 gene expression in the hippocampus of LE rats, and this effect was not seen in the LE rats that had a history of social defeat. These results also suggest that the WKY rats exhibit a delayed genomic adaptation to stress. The pattern of stress-induced hippocampal gene expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was similar to the pattern of expression of the OCT3 gene within both strains, but the within-groups differences did not reach statistical significance. However, there was a significant correlation between OCT3 and GR gene expression in the hippocampus within each strain, suggesting that glucocorticoid signaling may regulate both GR and OCT3 gene expression. OCT3 gene expression was not significantly altered by stress in the mPFC or the striatum of WKY rats or LE rats, which is consistent with previous studies in 5HTT-knockout mice in which upregulation of the OCT3 was restricted to the hippocampus. Tissues for western blot analysis of OCT3 protein expression were collected 3 hours after the onset of the acute stressor (or equivalent… Advisors/Committee Members: Devine, Darragh P. (committee chair), Foster, Tom (committee member), Yezierski, Robert P. (committee member), Reep, Roger L. (committee member), Rowland, Neil E. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Animal models; Antidepressants; Cell membranes; Corticosterone; Gene expression; Hippocampus; Protein synthesis; Rats; Stress tests; Traumatic stress disorders; depression, organic, stress

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APA (6th Edition):

Marcinkiewcz, C. (2010). A role for the organic cation transporter-3 in stress-induced psychopathology. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042538

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marcinkiewcz, Catherine. “A role for the organic cation transporter-3 in stress-induced psychopathology.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042538.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marcinkiewcz, Catherine. “A role for the organic cation transporter-3 in stress-induced psychopathology.” 2010. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Marcinkiewcz C. A role for the organic cation transporter-3 in stress-induced psychopathology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042538.

Council of Science Editors:

Marcinkiewcz C. A role for the organic cation transporter-3 in stress-induced psychopathology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2010. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042538


University of Florida

2. Patel, Shreena. Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain.

Degree: MS, Dental Sciences - Dentistry, 2008, University of Florida

Pain with orthodontic appliances plays a role in treatment acceptance and compliance. The literature, however, is inconclusive as to the preferred analgesic drug for management of orthodontic pain. Although most conclude that ibuprofen is an effective analgesic for mild to moderate pain associated with orthodontics, there is evidence in support of naproxen sodium and acetaminophen. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of three different analgesics (ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, and acetaminophen) administered prior to and after placement of separators, in reducing the incidence and severity of post-separator placement pain. The study also assessed the effectiveness of placebo administration, as well as the contribution of psychological factors and gender to the pain experience. Twenty-four non-orthodontic patients, 13 male and 11 female, participated in the study. Each subject randomly received one of four treatments: ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, acetaminophen or placebo. The dosing times were 1 hour prior to separator placement and 3 and 7 hours after separator placement. Prior to separator placement, subjects completed a State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule, a Masticatory Efficiency Test, and a Visual Analog Scale for expected pain and pain experienced with the Masticatory Efficiency Test. A pain dairy was kept for 24 hours. Subjects returned to the clinic after one week for separator removal. This protocol was followed twice more, at monthly intervals. By the end of the three months, each subject received three of the four treatments. The order of treatment drugs administered was randomized. Based on mixed model analyses (p < 0.05), pain following separators was significantly related to the treatment drug and the time following separator placement. Administering ibuprofen pre- and post- separator placement significantly reduced pain compared with placebo. The analgesic effects diminished by day 2, resulting in peak pain levels and decreased chewing efficiency at this time. The expected pain also played a role in experienced pain; subjects who expected more pain also reported more pain. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Wheeler, Timothy T. (committee chair), Yezierski, Robert P. (committee member), Fillingim, Roger B. (committee member), McGorray, Susan P. (committee member), Logan, Henrietta N. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Analgesics; Dosage; Mastication; Orthodontics; Orthods; Pain; Placebos; Rectal administration; Separators; Sodium; analgesics, drugs, ibuprofen, nsaids, orthodontics, pain, placement, post, pre, separators

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Patel, S. (2008). Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022167

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Patel, Shreena. “Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain.” 2008. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022167.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Patel, Shreena. “Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain.” 2008. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Patel S. Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2008. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022167.

Council of Science Editors:

Patel S. Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2008. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022167

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